GEST – Gothenburg English Studio Theatre

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 15th February 2016
  • Nordophile enjoys promoting the arts which come from all Nordic regions and bringing them to our English-speaking audience with a similar passion. So imagine our delight when we stumbled across a theatre group in Sweden which performs in English. This is certainly a must when heading over to Gothenburg for a cultural holiday! GEST – Gothenburg […]




    Nordophile enjoys promoting the arts which come from all Nordic regions and bringing them to our English-speaking audience with a similar passion. So imagine our delight when we stumbled across a theatre group in Sweden which performs in English. This is certainly a must when heading over to Gothenburg for a cultural holiday!

    GEST – Gothenburg English Studio Theatre is an award-winning English-speaking theatre located in Gothenburg, Sweden and is the only professional English-speaking theatre in western Sweden. We bring the very best of British contemporary drama in its original language to Sweden.

    GEST is run by Executive Artistic Director Kristina Brändén Whitaker and Co-Artistic Director Gary Whitaker. Actors are recruited in Britain before every production whilst a superb Swedish production team takes care of set and light design, music and administration.

     

    (Photo Lina Ikse taken from 2015 play YEN)

     

    It was founded in 2005 with the aim of providing quality, contemporary and award-winning theatre in the English language.

    GEST works with professional actors and directors from Britain and Sweden and aims to produce theatre of the highest standard, which is accessible to everyone. As well as performing in Sweden, GEST also performs internationally and are always keen to collaborate with theatres abroad. We also collaborate closely with schools, colleges and universities, offering specially reduced student prices, workshops and after-show discussions with the actors. (See Teachers’ page)

    Gothenburg has a large English-speaking population and is the home to a variety of nationalities where English is the second language. GEST also seeks to cater for these people, who may long for an enjoyable night at the theatre.

    At present nearly all the great English-speaking plays that are performed in Gothenburg are translated into Swedish. GEST are proud to be able to show the plays in the language that they were originally written.

     

    What’s on

     

    The Events

    Gothenburg English Studio Theatre presents the Swedish premiere of the award-winning and critically acclaimed play  The Events by David Greig. Music by John Browne. Directed by Gary Whitaker.

    8 April- 30 April at Gothenburg English Studio Theatre

    4 May – 14 May at Kulturhuset, Stadsteatern Stockholm

    (Photo: Lina Ikse)

     

    Featuring local choirs, The Events tells a story of obsession, grief and forgiveness

    Claire, a liberal church minister, runs a community choir in a small seaside town.
    “…a choir that brought together vulnerable people, old people, asylum seekers, immigrant men, young mums and so on – it was a – the idea was – you can imagine. ”

     Claire, a liberal church minister, runs a community choir in a small seaside town.
    ”…a choir that brought together vulnerable people, old people, asylum seekers, immigrant men, young mums and so on – it was a – the idea was – you can imagine.”

    One day a boy with a gun walks in during a choir rehearsal resulting in devastating consequences. Claire becomes obsessed with the boy and the reasons for his actions. She looks for answers among the politicians that the boy associates himself with, his father, old classmates and, in the end, the boy himself. It’s a journey that takes her to the edge of reason, science, politics and faith.

    The Events has a strong relevance to today’s development of far right extremism in Sweden and Europe whilst also exploring how far forgiveness can stretch in the face of brutality. Different local community choirs will join the cast on stage for each performance in this rare, daring and beautiful new play.

    To find out more about GEST and upcoming theatre productions head to GEST.se

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    Nordic Bakery celebrates Cinnamon Bun Day

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 23rd September 2015
  • One of the best ways to experience a country is through its cuisine and one of the best ways to gauge how important tradition is to a country, is through the esteem in which it holds it traditions. So when people are curious about why there is a Cinnamon Bun Day (Kanelbullens dag) in Sweden, […]




    One of the best ways to experience a country is through its cuisine and one of the best ways to gauge how important tradition is to a country, is through the esteem in which it holds it traditions. So when people are curious about why there is a Cinnamon Bun Day (Kanelbullens dag) in Sweden, what they should really be acknowledging is just how proud the Swedes are of their heritage, offerings and identity. A Cinnamon Bun sums this up perfectly! The smells and taste involved in the making and execution, many Swedes away from home say conjure up childhood memories of these delights being made. It is also a very symbolic social thing as the Cinnamon Bun is often hand in hand with the other time old tradition, the Fika, which is a moment in the day to take time out have a coffee and a bun and sit with friends and family to not let the day slip by.

     

     

    With Nordic Bakery serving not only its Nordic community in and around London but many Nordophiles for miles around who started out curious and are now hooked on some of the sweet delicacies from our favourite Nordic countries, Nordic Bakery will be proudly flying the flag for Cinnamon Bun Day (Kanelbullens dag). Come and enjoy a perfectly crafted bun or any one of their other bites and involve yourself in the festivities from the 28th Sept to 4th Oct.

    The Cinnamon Bun has been around since the 1920’s and has been celebrated since 1999 so this is still a relatively new festival, however it is embraced wholeheartedly and is definitely a fun way for any Nordophile to join in.

    Nordic Bakery have kindly sent us a recipe for the Cinnamon Bun from Miisa Mink ‘The Nordic bakery Cookbook’ by Ryland, Peters, Small and they tell us a little bit about what we can expect over the week long celebrations

     

    Created for Nordic Bakery Cinnamon bun week of celebrations – a caramel and pecan cinnamon bun which will be on sale next week only.

     

    Nordic Bakery, the Scandinavian style premium coffee shop chain, is giving Londoners a taste extravaganza of cinnamon buns with a week-long cinnamon bun celebration at all three London coffee shops (from 28 September – October 2014). Fans travel from all over London and abroad for Nordic Bakery’s iconic cinnamon buns (applauded by Time Out, Vogue and Evening Standard). Now they can have their favourite taste in a five different flavours (including cinnamon bun with blueberry and cinnamon bun with chocolate) with a different variety available during the Monday to Friday of Cinnamon Bun Week. The celebrations reach a peak at the weekend, when fans can choose from all the cinnamon bun flavours

    Dough

    570ml lukewarm milk

    150g caster sugar

    45g fresh yeast (or easy baked dried yeast according to manufacturer’s instructions)

    1 tsp cardamom seeds, crushed with a pestle and mortar

    180g unsalted butter, melted

    1 egg

    1 kg plain flour

    Filling

    100g unsalted butter, softened at room temperature

    200g dark brown soft sugar

    3 Tbsp ground cinnamon

    Glaze

    85g caster sugar

    1 Tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice

    2 baking trays, lined with non-stick baking paper

     

    Nordic Bakery cinnamon bun and cappuccino (1)

     

    To make the dough, put the milk, sugar, yeast, cardamom, melted butter and egg in a food processor or mixer with a dough hook.  With the motor running, gradually add the flour until it is all incorporated and the dough has come together.

     

    Transfer the dough to a bowl, cover with a clean tea towel and leave to prove in a warm place for 1 hour, or until it has doubled in size.

     

    After 1 hour, punch down the dough and transfer onto a lightly floured surface. Using a rolling pin, roll it out until it is about 30 x 80cm and 7mm thick.

     

    For the filling, spread the butter evenly over the dough and sprinkle the sugar and cinnamon all over the top.

    Roll the dough up from a long side. Cut into roughly 6-cm rolls, but cut them at an angle – so, make the first cut diagonally, then the second cut about 6cm along diagonally in the opposite direction. You should get a roll that looks like a trapezium (or a triangle with the tip chopped off). Carefully transfer the buns to the prepared baking trays, with the longest edge of the bun sitting on the tray, cover with tea towers again and leave to prove in a warm place for 30-60 mins, until almost doubled in size.

     

    Preheat oven to 200C or 400F or Gas 6. Bake the buns in the preheated oven for 20-25min or until golden brown.

     

    To make the glaze, put the sugar, lemon juice and 100ml water in a small saucepan and bring to the boil. Simmer for 10-15 min, until slightly thickened. The glaze will still be quite watery.

     

    Remove the buns from the oven, transfer onto a wire rack and brush the glaze generously over them. Leave to cool before serving.

    Head over to Nordicbakery to find out more

     

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    Swedish composer – B Tommy Andersson

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 28th August 2015
  • Swedish composer B Tommy Andersson is the Composer-in -Association for BBC NOW for the 2014/15 Season. His last big piece to be performed by them is a new commission from the BBC to be premiered at the BBC Proms on 3 September 2015. Pan is the piece to be performed: The music is inspired by the […]




    Swedish composer B Tommy Andersson is the Composer-in -Association for BBC NOW for the 2014/15 Season. His last big piece to be performed by them is a new commission from the BBC to be premiered at the BBC Proms on 3 September 2015.

    Pan is the piece to be performed:

    The music is inspired by the ancient Greek myths about the god Pan; the god of Nature, of the Wild, of Shepherds, and of Rustic Music. He is also known for his sexual powers and for playing the pan pipe. The large organ is used as an element in the orchestration. In a way, the organ becomes sort of a gigantic pan pipe, representing the god Pan.

     

    B Tommy Andersson 3 (72dpi)

     

    Nordophile wanted to know about this Swedish music master who composes and conducts throughout the world.

    B Tommy Andersson was composing music at the age of 11. At that point it was mostly small pieces for one or two violins, but he soon became interested in writing pieces on a larger scale. The first piece of Andersson’s music performed in public was the Prelude and Fugue in F major for organ, performed by Lars-Erik Bernvill in Sandhult Church, 20 May 1979.

     

    preludium-kopia2

     

    At fourteen years old, he started to study orchestration with a local conductor in Borås, Jan-Anders Eriksson, who generously gave his time and advice to his young student. He also studied harmony and counterpoint with an elderly military band leader, Arne Ask. In the spring of 1980, a larger orchestral piece, Trolle-Ljungby Horn och Pipa, was performed by the local youth symphony orchestra in Borås. This, of course, inspired Tommy to learn even more about composition. During the Borås years, the local music school continuously commissioned him to write musical arrangements and he had many opportunities to listen to what he had composed or arranged.

     

    julen-1981

     

     

    During his high school years in Borås, he also studied composition with composer Sven-Eric Johanson in Gothenburg (1981—83). Andersson was quite productive during these years (writing about 25 compositions), considering that he also went through high school and in addition, played several instruments. The studies with Johanson focused on counterpoint in Palestrina-style (according to Knud Jeppesens textbook), twelve-tone technique (according to Ernst Krenek’s principles) and Paul Hindemith’s Unterweisung im Tonsatz.

    In the course of his studies in the music teacher’s class in Stockholm, from the Autumn of 1983, he took composition lessons with Hans Eklund and Professor Sven-David Sandström. At first, he continued to compose regularly and received several commissions. During the years 1991—2001, B. Tommy Andersson was focusing on establishing his conducting career. That is the reason why so few pieces were composed during this period. Nevertheless, three larger works were created; the Horn Concerto, Apollo — the successful concerto for solo percussion and orchestra, written in 1995 for Markus Leoson, and Satyricon. Furthermore, quite a few arrangements, orchestrations, transcriptions for symphonic band and adaptations for chamber orchestra were made during these ten years.

     

     

    Since the turn of the century, his music has increasingly attracted more attention and several larger pieces have been commissioned and performed. Among these, we find an opera, orchestral pieces, and choral pieces. In April 2009, the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra in Stockholm gave a festival entirely dedicated to the music of B Tommy Andersson. During four days, 24 of his compositions were performed in Stockholm Concert Hall. It was a great success, just like the CD Satyricon, which was released in 2009 and received highest possible acclaim from the critics.

     

    Interview

    We are really interested in hearing how you first discovered your talent for composing and conducting? Do you feel the two go hand in hand with having such an understanding of music?

    When I was eight years old, I was given the opportunity to learn to play an instrument in the local music school in the city Borås (a city situated 60 km west of Gothenburg), where I grew up. Like everybody else, I had to start with the recorder, but then I switched to the violin. In those days, all children were offered this possibility for free, which tells a lot about the kind of society Sweden was in the 1970’s. Had this not been the case, it is not at all certain that I would have come into the world of classical music, since there was no tradition of music in my family.

    In the music school, I met several enthusiastic and inspiring people, who opened my eyes and ears to classical music. By coincidence, the municipal library happened to have a large collection of orchestral scores, a result of a donation, which I happened to notice. For me, the discovery of the connection between the music I listened to and the notation in the scores was exhilarating. I listened a lot to classical music on the radio, which gave me access to a wide repertory. The classical channel (P2) was a really fantastic thing for me, since in those days, prior to the easy access everybody has today through Internet, it was very expensive and difficult to get to hear the music you wanted to get to know. Before long I systematically borrowed the scores to the music that was broadcast, and I followed the music in the score as I was listening.

    For some reason, this inspired me to try to compose my own pieces. In the beginning, when I was around eleven years old, it was small pieces for one or two violins, which I played together with my violin teacher. But one thing led to another, and shortly I tried to compose bigger pieces. Through the music school I received wonderful help from enthusiastic teachers to learn the craft and I was also given lots of opportunities to hear my music played, which is, of course, the ultimate inspiration to continue composing.

    Before I left Borås, at age 19, for studies at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm, I had already been able to listen to many of my own pieces, also some orchestral works. By then, I had also conducted my own music on some occasions, and somehow it became clear that I had a talent for conducting.

    My original intention was to try to become a professional composer. But in the early 1980’s, the prevalent style of new music was much more modernistic than I was comfortable with, and I realized that it would become tough for me to become successful as a composer, so after a while I put more time and energy into trying to become a professional conductor instead.

    Times have changed, however, and since the mid 1990’s the scene for contemporary music is open to a wider spectrum of musical styles. Suddenly, my music has become increasingly appreciated and I have taken up composition again.

    For me, the combination of being conductor and composer is really successful, since the two roles are closely related. I learn new things about music and composition every time I conduct, particularly during the rehearsals, and the experience as a conductor gives insights in music-making that is invaluable for a composer.

     

    Coming from Sweden how have you seen the arts appreciated and encouraged there?

    Sweden is, like all the other Nordic countries, situated on the outskirts of Europe. Because of this, it took more time for cultural phenomena to reach us in the 18th and 19th centuries. As a result of this, it was not until the 20th century, particularly the second half of it, that a proper infrastructure for classical music was built up, in the form of several professional orchestras and opera houses.

    The state support for art, theatre, literature, and music has been strong since WWII. It’s not until the last decade that neoliberal ideas has become involved in the discussion about cultural financing. Despite severe cuts in the culture budgets in many countries around the world, the cultural institutions in Sweden have so far remained rather intact.

     

    Boras

     

    • Can you tell us a little bit about your new commission for the BBC, Pan, which is to be performed at the BBC Proms September 3rd?

    The piece is inspired by the ancient Greek myths about the god Pan; the god of Nature, of the Wild, of Shepherds and of Rustic Music. He is also known for his sexual powers and for playing the pan pipe. Pan is sometimes depicted as a rather small and not very attractive being, horned and goat-like. On the other hand, he could also be rendered as an imposing, beautiful, and seductive man, albeit with some characteristic features like horns and a tail. Regardless of his appearance, he is to be reckoned as a powerful force of nature. The word “panic” (Panikon) was used by the ancient Greeks to describe the feeling of fear that was incited to men and animals alike when they sensed that Pan was nearby.

    The organ is used as an element in the orchestration and it becomes a gigantic pan pipe, representing the god Pan. The loud organ is a manifestation of the immense power that the god possesses, and at the same time the panic that he stirs around himself.

    Despite rather illustrative musical characters, the music is by no means programme music in the sense that it tells a story. I have been influenced by several different representations of Pan, from old Graeco-Roman pictures and statues, paintings of Nicolas Poussin, and also more contemporary artwork, such as the images by the Italian painter Roberto Ferri.

     

    How did your relationship with the BBC come about?

    It is a direct result of that the Danish principal conductor of BBC National Orchestra of Wales, Thomas Søndergård, likes my music. He wanted me to be Composer-in-Association with his orchestra for one year, and there we are.

     

    What do you have coming up after this?

    In terms of composition, I’m working on a violin concerto right now. When it’s finished, it will be followed by a couple of choral works, and after that my second opera. Besides composing, I have several conducting engagements, and I am also Professor of Orchestral Conducting at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm.

     

    BBC_Proms_31

     

    Find out more about the BBC Proms, 3rd September BBC.co.uk/proms

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    Nordic Book Talk

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 24th August 2015
  • ScanHouseFront

    Nordic book talk at Scandinavia House – The Nordic Center in America. Some very special Nordic literary events in New York. We focus on two book lectures given by Nordic authors who we suggest you follow closely over the coming months, as there is going be a lot of talk about both.     The […]




    Nordic book talk at Scandinavia House – The Nordic Center in America. Some very special Nordic literary events in New York.

    We focus on two book lectures given by Nordic authors who we suggest you follow closely over the coming months, as there is going be a lot of talk about both.

     

    banner_lectures_literaryWEB

     

    The Girl in the Spider’s Web – Book talk with David Lagercrantz.

    Tuesday, September 15th, 6.30pm. Free

     

    girl-spider-banner

     

    Hear Swedish journalist and best-selling author David Lagercrantz discuss the highly-anticipated The Girl in the Spider’s Web (Knopf Doubleday, 2015) – book four in the worldwide bestselling Millennium series of novels, which launched in the U.S. in 2008  – with Stieg Larsson’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (Knopf Doubleday).

    In this adrenaline-charged thriller, genius hacker Lisbeth Salander and journalist Mikael Blomkvist face a dangerous new threat and must again join forces. Late one night, Blomkvist receives a phone call from a trusted source claiming to have information vital to the United States. The source has been in contact with a young female super hacker–a hacker resembling someone Blomkvist knows all too well. The implications are staggering.

    Blomkvist, in desperate need of a scoop for Millennium, turns to Lisbeth for help. She, as usual, has her own agenda. In The Girl in the Spider’s Web, the duo who thrilled 80 million readers in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played with Fire (Knopf Doubleday, 2009)and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest (Knopf Doubleday, 2010) meet again in an extraordinary and uniquely of-the-moment thriller.

    Following the discussion, copies of the book will be available for purchase and signing.

    About the author

    David Lagercrantz studied philosophy and religion at university and subsequently attended the School of Journalism in Göteborg. After graduating, he worked as a crime reporter for Expressen, a national daily paper. He is now head of news and current affairs on Swedish Public Radio.

    Lagercrantz made his debut as an author in 1997 with the publication of Ultimate High (Discovery Books, 1999), the story of Göran Kropp, the Swedish adventurer who climbed Mount Everest using his own physical means and without any outside assistance. He followed with The Angels of Åmsele (Albert Bonniers Förlag, 1998)about the triple murder he covered as a journalist a decade earlier. In 2000 Lagercrantz published A Swedish Genius (Albert Bonniers Förlag), a biography of inventor Håkan Lans and in 2005, he returned his attention to the Himalayas to write his first thriller, The Sky over Everest (Pirat).

    Lagercrantz is perhaps best known for working with Swedish football star Zlatan Ibrahimović on his critically acclaimed memoir, I Am Zlatan, which was published by Månpocket in 2011 and broke sales records in Sweden and throughout Europe. The book sold 500,000 hardcover copies in Sweden in less than two months and was later shortlisted for the William Hill Sports Book of the Year award and nominated for the August Prize in Sweden. To date, I Am Zlatan has been published in over 30 languages around the world and sold millions of copies.

    In 2009, Lagercrantz published The Fall of Man in Wilmslow (Forlaget Modtryk), a historical novel about the English mathematician and code-breaker Alan Turing. The book was well received in Sweden and rights were sold to publishers in 15 countries. Knopf will publish the book in the U.S. in fall 2016.

     

    Rock, Paper, Scissors – Book talk with Naja Marie Aidt.

    Thursday, September 10th, 6.30pm. Free

     

    rock-paper-scissors-banner

     

    Acclaimed Danish poet and writer Naja Marie Aidt discusses her long-awaited first novel Rock, Paper, Scissors (Open Letter Books, 2015) – a breathtaking page-turner and complex portrait of a man whose life slowly devolves into one of paranoia and jealousy – with ATLAS magazine editor Maria Marqvard Jensen.

    Rock, Paper, Scissors opens shortly after the death of Thomas and Jenny’s criminal father. While trying to fix a toaster that he left behind, Thomas discovers a secret, setting into motion a series of events leading to the dissolution of his life, and plunging him into a dark, shadowy underworld of violence and betrayal.

    A gripping story written with a poet’s sensibility and attention to language, Rock, Paper, Scissors showcases all of Aidt’s gifts and introduces a whole new audience to one of Denmark’s most decorated and beloved writers.

    Following the discussion, copies of the book will be available for purchase and signing.

    About the author

    Naja Marie Aidt was born in Greenland and raised in Copenhagen. She is the author of ten collections of poetry and three short story collections, including Baboon (Two Lines Press, 2006), which received the Nordic Council’s Literature Prize (2008) and the Danish Critics’ Prize for Literature (2007). Her books have been translated into nine languages. Rock, Paper, Scissors is her first novel.

    About the moderator

    Maria Marqvard Jensen holds a Masters in Language and Literature from Copenhagen University. She specializes in managing literary events in New York, most recently for the PEN World Voices Festival. She is the book editor for the Danish ATLAS magazine and her translation of Mark Twain’s The Diaries of Adam and Eve was published in Denmark in December 2014 by ATLAS.

     

    ScanHouseFront

     

    Nordic Book Club

    Read and discuss Scandinavian literature in translation as part of Nordic Book Club – ASF’s newest literary series. This season’s selections include Swedish crime thrillers, Danish contemporary fiction, and Finnish fantasy. Discussions typically take place the last Tuesday of the month in the Halldór Laxness Library at Scandinavia House and online at Scandinaviahouse.org 

    Tuesdays, 6 pm: September 29 & October 27, 2015
    Series continues fall 2015 & winter 2016
    Free | #nordicbookclub

    Head to Scandinaviahouse.org to find out about more Nordic events

    Text and photos courtesy of Scandinavia House.

     

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    Short film – Happy Thoughts

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 28th July 2015
  • 10842218_1594978707412800_1924650185458717261_o

    Nordophile heard about the short film – Happy Thoughts which was shot in Sala, Sweden. It has no spoken dialogue, only music and the actors ability to convey the story through motion.     We spoke with the American writer of Happy Thoughts, Kimberly Durley and she not only spoke with passion about her film but […]




    Nordophile heard about the short film – Happy Thoughts which was shot in Sala, Sweden. It has no spoken dialogue, only music and the actors ability to convey the story through motion.

     

    10842218_1594978707412800_1924650185458717261_o

     

    We spoke with the American writer of Happy Thoughts, Kimberly Durley and she not only spoke with passion about her film but also gave great praise for all of her Nordic team who have made this short film one to watch. From her Swedish Director of Photography Jonas Nyren, who is a 23 year old filmmaker/writer/director/actor from Vittninge, Sweden, to the gaffer and lighting tech Nataniel Matias from Gothenburg who is currently attending film school at Tarna Folkhogskola.

     

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    Happy Thoughts was filmed entirely at the train station in Sala, Sweden. You may have heard of Sala before if you have heard of the TV Nordic Supernatural drama “Jordskott”. Jordskott was also filmed in Sala and Kimberly worked on the show as part of the scenography team for most of last year.

     

    Sala_station_2010

     

     

    Music is extremely important to the film and adds to the telling of the story. Both music and sound were done by Daniel Johnsson, a Swedish troubadour and Gustaf Grefberg a Swedish sound engineer and musician. Kimberly explained  “The film has no dialogue, so the majority of its feel landed on these guys”. Gustaf was a pretty big part of the evolution of synth music in Sweden and he was one of the original members of Starbreeze Studios. He now works for Hazelight with Josef Fares making video games.  Daniel is the founder of Aardia, a music group from Sundsvall Sweden, and he’s a well sought-after troubadour as well.

     

     

    Group_Photo

     

    Synopsis:

    Stan has never felt so lonely or so hopeless. Life has landed him in the worst position he could ever imagine and now it is all he can do to keep himself from drowning in his bitterness at the world. That is, until Joy comes along and shines a little ray of sunlight into his dreary existence by giving him hot coffee on a cold morning, in a hand colored mug. This small act of kindness kindles a unique relationship between them which just might bring Stan to a greater understanding of how love, compassion and even joy can be found even in the most unexpected circumstances.

     

    Actors

     

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    Kristofer is a musician and filmmaker who goes by the name of Kristofer “Waxblend” Hedström is 31 and lives in the South of Sweden. He grew up in Sala where the short film “Happy Thoughts” was filmed. When he’s not acting/producing he makes hip-hop music under the Waxblend moniker. He is also studying business economy. He has  a passion for creating stuff, whether it’s music, film or just writing something.

    Magdalena Eriksson studied method acting at Folkuniversitetet, Stockholm. In 2007 she started working in the film industry as a makeup artist and did that for many years. Later on she wanted to try acting, got an education in method acting and loved it. So Magdalena quit doing makeup and started acting instead. The part as Joy in Happy thoughts was a real challenge though because there are no actual lines, the acting depends only on body language and facial expressions, hard but fun and educating. She enjoyed every minute of being Joy and being a part of bringing Kimberly’s beautiful story to life. Upcoming projects: A Web series, Timewars ll. Shooting starts in the autumn of 2015, and a feature, 1%- the voice within, shooting starts 2016.

     

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    Find out more  Facebook/Happythoughts/shortfilm &  whitebridges.se

     

     

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    Cooper & Wolf

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 23rd July 2015
  • In need of a Fika? Want to discover more about Sweden through its food? Or just want to see what all the buzz about Nordic eateries is which is?     Nordophile is very pleased to of found an authentic Swedish place who can answer all of your questions in one go! Cooper & Wolf first opened […]




    In need of a Fika? Want to discover more about Sweden through its food? Or just want to see what all the buzz about Nordic eateries is which is?

     

     

    Nordophile is very pleased to of found an authentic Swedish place who can answer all of your questions in one go!

    Cooper & Wolf first opened its doors in 2012 and it serves honest home cooked Swedish food and serves coffee

    They are a family run café/restaurant, offering breakfast and lunch seven days a week in the heart of Clapton, overlooking Millfields Park.

     

     

    They are proud to offer a menu of honest home cooked Swedish food inspired by head chef Paul and owner Sara’s family recipes, going back by generations. Dishes include Swedish meatballs, fresh fish and vegetarian options. Using quality seasonal produce, we pickle our own herring and make our gravlax (cured salmon) in-house.

    Every day they offer a “Dagens” daily special from the menu.

     

     

    They bake their own Swedish cinnamon buns (Kanelbullar) and a selection of cakes daily.

    They’re passionate about coffee using beans from Caravan’s Roastery in Kings Cross espresso based coffees from their beautiful Synesso machine and a changing weekly selection of single origin beans at the pour over bar all served by head barista James and co.

    They also offer a lovely selection of teas from their friends at ‘Make Tea not War

     

    cooper

    www.cooperandwolf.co.uk

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    Nordic Supernatural

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 13th July 2015
  • Saraochmats01_fotoMagnusLiamKarlsson

    Nordophile has noticed an engrossment in Nordic Supernatural recently and we wanted to look closer at the amalgamation of different genres within the Nordic category. Nordic Noir is a genre which has exploded into the homes of Nordophiles everywhere. Nordic murder and intrigue has gone global as a genre, but there has recently been an […]




    Nordophile has noticed an engrossment in Nordic Supernatural recently and we wanted to look closer at the amalgamation of different genres within the Nordic category.

    Nordic Noir is a genre which has exploded into the homes of Nordophiles everywhere. Nordic murder and intrigue has gone global as a genre, but there has recently been an interest for readers to find out what other genres Nordic authors are producing.

    With the rising obsession for dramas coming our way like Jordskott from Sweden which is both supernatural and mythical, we are now questioning which books can feed our Nordic passion if we don’t just want Noir.

     

     

    Nordophile is taken by two very talented writers, Sara B. Elfgren and Mats Strandberg from Sweden who have done just that. Teaming up they have co-wrote a supernatural, mythology trilogy from the depths of the Nordic heartland (Bergslagen, Sweden) to bring us not just your typical Nordic, dark, intense novel full of transgressions and subtle undertones of social malfunctions but this writing duo have expanded the subject and added the element of supernatural realism where this thread seems to run adjacent with everyday life. The writers have thought this through and not just taken the chance to just take a different path, because you get the feeling that this is a subject they believe in, one they want to filter through, making a natural impact. Nordic Supernatural looks like it’s slowly starting to work its way up with its counterparts and we expect much more of the coming months.

     

    Saraochmats01_fotoMagnusLiamKarlsson

     

    The Engelsfors Trilogy

    This trilogy contains the titles THE CIRCLE, FIRE and THE KEY. THE CIRCLE was published in April 2011 in Sweden, FIRE in April 2012 and the final part, THE KEY was published in Sweden autumn 2013.

     

    THE CIRCLE

    6 young girls who just started high school, and who have nothing in common, find out they are hunted by an ancient evil. Involuntarily they are all drawn to a meeting in the forest one late night when the moon is mysteriously red. They are told that they are witches. They are ‘The Chosen Ones’. From this day on, they must learn how to work together despite their differences and they have to master the forces that have awakened within them. Time is running out. Something is hunting them and if they don’t find it and defeat it, it will find them.

                                                  

    FIRE

    ‘The Chosen Ones’ ones are about to start their second year in senior high school. The whole summer break they have held their breaths waiting for the demons’ next move. But the threat shows up from another direction, somewhere they could never have foreseen. It becomes more and more obvious that something is very, very wrong in Engelsfors. The past is woven together with the present. The living meet the dead. The Chosen ones are tied even closer together and are once again reminded that magic cannot ease unhappy love or mend broken hearts.

                               

    THE KEY

    The final title in the trilogy is THE KEY.  The threads and paths are woven together, and the finale is fantastic as the girls and others involved manage to stop the apocalypse.

     

    The trilogy has gone global and the interest for The Circle has been huge from day one. The rights are now sold to 29 countries.

     

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    Genre

    The books are written as crossover titles and aims for young adults and teenagers. But the way they are written they can easily be read by adults as well which from readership seems to be true, it appeals to a wide range audience. One big difference from other books in this genre of paranormal titles is that it’s not the story about pretty girl meets dangerous boy/man (ie vampire). Instead, the main characters are six strong and brave young girls struggling to find themselves and to do good.

     

    Publisher                                                                                             

    As soon as Rabén & Sjögren, one of Sweden’s leading publisher of children’s  and YA books,  laid eyes on the script they wanted to publish the trilogy, and invested big in the whole trilogy from day one with a first print run of 12 000 copies, which is very high for Sweden. As of today, the first book in the trilogy has sold 140 000 copies in Sweden alone.

     

    Film 

    The film rights for THE ENGELSFORS TRILOGY were sold to the new film production company RMV Film, owned and run by former ABBA-member Benny Andersson and his son Ludvig Andersson.  Mats Strandberg and Sara B. Elfgren both took an active part in the project. Sara B. Elfgren wrote the script together with director Levan Akin. The film aired in Sweden in February 2015 and July 8th 2015 it was released on dvd and blueray in Sweden.

     

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    Find out more worldofengelsfors.com

    Photos Magnus Liam Karlsson & Niklas Alexandersson.

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    Bageriet – Swedish Bakery, London

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 8th July 2015
  • bageriet

    Nordophile has been watching the trend on all things Nordic spread throughout London and the one thing which best shows off the Nordic traditions, way of life and customs, is food. Nordic food normally has a story to tell in its ingredients and the process it goes through. So with more and more Nordic cafes/restaurants/bakeries […]




    Nordophile has been watching the trend on all things Nordic spread throughout London and the one thing which best shows off the Nordic traditions, way of life and customs, is food. Nordic food normally has a story to tell in its ingredients and the process it goes through. So with more and more Nordic cafes/restaurants/bakeries popping up in and around London, we wanted to go back to basics. To a method and tradition which encapsulates good old fashioned Nordic baking. This brought us to Bageriet! and we spoke with Daniel Karlsson to find out more.
    bageriet
    Bageriet is the Swedish word meaning The Bakery
    I started the bakery “Bageriet”in 2011 as an online bakery, stocking the the Swedish grocer on 32 Crawford street”totallyswedish” with a variety  of bagged biscuits and cinnamon buns.
    that went very well and I noticed a huge interest in Swedish bread tradition amongst the English customers so in 2013 I teamed up with my friend and super colleague from Sweden, Sven-gunnar and so we opened the shop on 24 rose street.
    We have enjoyed since then a very good two years and such a good response from the Londoners and we are very much enjoying being ambassadors for Swedish bread and cake traditions here in the UK.
    We bake everything at site in the basement bakery with very good ingredients,most of them shipped from Sweden.
    Most of our recipes are from our families and are very traditional. So when you come to us you can be sure of experiencing something genuine and Swedish.
    For our customers we also offer traditional soft drinks like sockerdricka, hallonsoda and päronsoda which probably even my grandparents were enjoying in their youth.
    Even the music we play in the shop is a selection of old and new from Swedish artists.
    So I think its fair to say we are good Swedish ambassadors

    bagerietphoto Daniel Karlsson/Sven-Gunnar Appelgren. Photo © Joe Sarah


    Daniel Karlsson Owner.

    The Pastry chef
    My career in pastry started when I was 20 years old and I began three years of excellent training at the HRS school in Gothenburg, Sweden, including a year of work experience in a professional bakery.

    As with many passionate chefs, a foodie mother or grandparent inspired them to choose their profession. In this case my mother and especially so my grandmother, Harriet Karlsson, lit the spark in me. She was an extraordinary good cook and sweet maker. I cherish what she taught me and still use some of her biscuit recipes.

    Being a baker or pastry chef is a wonderful profession if you are passionate. For me, it is a real joy to create sweets, cakes, bread, etc.

    I came to London and England because I was curious of the British culture, which in these of my first four years I’ve grown to love. Now, I want to realise my dream to share the passion of my craft and the wonderful Swedish cake tradition of which I am very proud.

    Bageriet_3

    Head over to Bageriet.co.uk

     

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    Crayfish Festival at Fika, London

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 19th June 2015
  • crayfish2

    The creative and quirky Fika, Swedish bar & kitchen is doing it again. Two years ago it was the Wes Anderson theme, last year it was Hidden Folk. This year it is transforming the tranquil roof terrace and ground floor into a buzzing and vibrant crayfish festival to last almost three weeks!       […]




    The creative and quirky Fika, Swedish bar & kitchen is doing it again.

    Two years ago it was the Wes Anderson theme, last year it was Hidden Folk. This year it is transforming the tranquil roof terrace and ground floor into a buzzing and vibrant crayfish festival to last almost three weeks!

     

    crayfish2

     

     

    Crayfish parties, or kräftskiva in Swedish, are a tradition not to be missed. Long sharing tables outdoor and indoor with an endless amount of crayfish, herring, gravadlax, chicken liver pate, bread and cheeses. Huge jars of crayfish filled and refilled to the top, Swedish beer bottles of snaps passing around for a traditional “skål!” with friends and family.

     

     

    crayfish3

     

    For those who dare go all the way, there will be the traditional party hats, the snaps songs and of course a large variety of snaps to choose from. All this and so much more will be happening at Fika between July 30th and August 16th. No need for a flight ticket, step in, into a Swedish summer! Fika will be serving fresh and tasty seafood accompanied with intriguing tinctures. It is a momentary journey, away from the hipsters of the East, all the way across the North Sea. If only for a few hours. For a set price of £35 each guest will enjoy all you can eat crayfish, bread & butter, herring and gravadlax. Drinks are not included. Special diets can be accommodated upon requests minimum 24h in advance.

     

     

    crayfish

     

    Both walk-ins and bookings will be available.

    Fika Bar & Kitchen – 161 Brick Lane, London, E1 6SB Tel: 02076132013 E: fika@fikalondon.com

     

     

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    Wallander – The Opera

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 18th June 2015
  • mariagatan-ystad

    Nordophile was very intrigued to hear that Wallander – The Opera, is being brought to the public. We spoke to Dr. Karl G. Rijkhoek from Universität Tübingen, who was only too happy to send us some information about this amazing collaboration of talents, combining together an author’s successful work, with operatic directors and composers. In summer […]




    Nordophile was very intrigued to hear that Wallander – The Opera, is being brought to the public. We spoke to Dr. Karl G. Rijkhoek from Universität Tübingen, who was only too happy to send us some information about this amazing collaboration of talents, combining together an author’s successful work, with operatic directors and composers.

    In summer 2016, the University of Tübingen will bring policeman Kurt Wallander from Henning Mankell’s Swedish crime novels to the opera stage for the first time. The opera “W – The Truth Beyond” will be composed by Fredrik Sixten from Sweden. The libretto is written in English by Swedish dramatist Klas Abrahamsson and the project is spearheaded by University Music Director, Philipp Amelung.

    “It was not difficult for me to say yes to this fascinating project”, says Composer Fredrik Sixten. “Opera Wallander has, through Klas Abrahamsson ingenious libretto, everything a composer can dream of. With many strong emotions, an exciting crime drama, a message for our time and thus many opportunities for my expressive music to present itself in its full width.”

     

    henning-mankell

     

    Under the creative direction of Philipp Amelung, Collegium Musicum, the University Music Society and students from Musikhochschule Stuttgart will perform the opera. Actor and television presenter Malte Arkona will direct the stage performance. Project cooperation partners and sponsors include the Institute of Musicology, the Departments of Media, German and Scandinavian Studies at the University of Tübingen, and the towns of Tübingen and Ystad, Wallander’s hometown. The premiere will be performed on 15 July 2016 in Tübingen and accompanied by Württembergische Philharmonie from Reutlingen. The Swedish premiere will be held on 13 August 2016 in Ystad theatre accompanied by the orchestra La Banda modern.

    “I became acquainted with Fredik Sixten’s compositions some time ago and I have always loved the Wallander novels – it seemed a natural idea to put the two together,” explains Amelung on his inspiration for the project. Henning Mankell met Amelung personally in 2013 and gave his sup- port for the project. Mankell, who is also a lover of music advised Amelung: “You need to find your own way to use the story that is appropriate to your medium.”

     

    mariagatan-ystad

     

    “The project is an incredible creative challenge,” says Amelung. Wallander’s character has many facets and the aging policeman struggles with alcohol abuse and loneliness. The opera follows on from “The Troubled Man” where Wallander is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. At Wallander’s retirement celebration, the policeman is approached by Tobias Jonsson. Jonsson, who Wallander convicted for the murder of his own father 15 years ago, assures Wallander of his innocence. This awakens Wallander’s curiosity and he agrees to reopen the case.

    “One insight I have gained during the work is how similar the crime novel and the world of opera is”, says librettist Klas Abrahamsson. “Both deal with the violent death, strong feelings and incredibly cruel scenes. From that point of view, it ́s almost surprising that – as far as I know – there are no more operas based on contemporary crime novels written yet!”

     

    krister-henriksson

     

    The Wallander novels have been filmed by Swedish television and the BBC over the last two decades. Between 2005 and 2014, the crime series “Mankells Wallander” was filmed as a German- Swedish co-production. However, this is the first Wallander opera.

    In the winter semester 2015/16, the University of Tübingen will offer an interdisciplinary seminar to accompany the opera which will examine the novels, films and music. A documentary is being filmed to record the progress of the production from the creative process to the performance.

     

    About the artists

    Composer: Fredrik Sixten is one of the leading church musicians in Scandinavia. He was an organist at Härnösand Cathedral in Sweden and Nidarasdom in Trondheim, Norway. In 2010 he was award- ed “Composer of the Year” by the Stockholm Music Association. Sixten, who is a free musician since mid-2014, has mainly composed oratorios, a requiem, a St. Mark passion and a Christmas oratorio.

     

    fredrik-sixten

     

    Librettist: Klas Abrahamsson regularly writes scripts for film and television. He also wrote the screenplay for the Wallander novel “The Midsummer murder”. In Germany, he is known for his play “Das Wunder von Schweden. Eine musikalische Möbelsaga”. In March 2015, he was awarded the Swedish Ibsen prize.

     

    klas-abrahamsson

     

    Creative director: Philipp Amelung has been University Music Director at the University of Tübingen since 2011. Previously, he was the acting choral director of the Munich Bach Choir and the director of Schola Cantorum, Lepizig.

     

    philipp-amelung

     

    Stage director: Malte Arkona has performed in several Munich operas such as Engelbert Humper- dincks “Hansel and Gretel” and was awarded the Echo Klassik in 2013 and 2014 as a narrator for orchestral audiobooks. Arkona, who is also a television presenter, has been studying at the Institute of Musicology at the University of Tübingen since 2010.

     

    malte-arkona

     

    The realisation of an opera about Henning Mankell’s fictional character Kurt Wallander represents a tremendous interdisciplinary opportunity at the Eberhard Karls University in Tübingen. As originally conceived by UMD Philipp Amelung, the project has inspired the department chairs of musicology, media science, Scandinavian language and German language and literature studies to pool their talents and resources in a unique artistic collaboration. The artists already at work on the project include, in addition to Mr. Amelung, the librettist Klas Abrahamsson and Swedish composer Fredrik Six- ten. Happily, the Swedish city of Ystad has joined as a significant partner in supporting the production of the Kurt Wallander opera, making possible the performance of the opera in the very city where Mankell’s Kurt Wallander novels take place. In January 2013, Philipp Amelung met with author Henning Mankell who expressed great joy in, as well as support for, the transformation of his literary creation onto the opera stage. The objective of this project is to conceive, develop, and bring to life a new type of artistic genre – the criminal opera. The Collegium Musicum, with its director Philipp Amelung, is determined to expand the opera audience base by reaching out to friends of opera, criminal novel devotees, film enthusiasts, and lovers of contemporary music.

    Information courtesy of uni-tuebingen.de

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