GEST – Gothenburg English Studio Theatre

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 15th February 2016
  • Nordophile enjoys promoting the arts which come from all Nordic regions and bringing them to our English-speaking audience with a similar passion. So imagine our delight when we stumbled across a theatre group in Sweden which performs in English. This is certainly a must when heading over to Gothenburg for a cultural holiday! GEST – Gothenburg […]




    Nordophile enjoys promoting the arts which come from all Nordic regions and bringing them to our English-speaking audience with a similar passion. So imagine our delight when we stumbled across a theatre group in Sweden which performs in English. This is certainly a must when heading over to Gothenburg for a cultural holiday!

    GEST – Gothenburg English Studio Theatre is an award-winning English-speaking theatre located in Gothenburg, Sweden and is the only professional English-speaking theatre in western Sweden. We bring the very best of British contemporary drama in its original language to Sweden.

    GEST is run by Executive Artistic Director Kristina Brändén Whitaker and Co-Artistic Director Gary Whitaker. Actors are recruited in Britain before every production whilst a superb Swedish production team takes care of set and light design, music and administration.

     

    (Photo Lina Ikse taken from 2015 play YEN)

     

    It was founded in 2005 with the aim of providing quality, contemporary and award-winning theatre in the English language.

    GEST works with professional actors and directors from Britain and Sweden and aims to produce theatre of the highest standard, which is accessible to everyone. As well as performing in Sweden, GEST also performs internationally and are always keen to collaborate with theatres abroad. We also collaborate closely with schools, colleges and universities, offering specially reduced student prices, workshops and after-show discussions with the actors. (See Teachers’ page)

    Gothenburg has a large English-speaking population and is the home to a variety of nationalities where English is the second language. GEST also seeks to cater for these people, who may long for an enjoyable night at the theatre.

    At present nearly all the great English-speaking plays that are performed in Gothenburg are translated into Swedish. GEST are proud to be able to show the plays in the language that they were originally written.

     

    What’s on

     

    The Events

    Gothenburg English Studio Theatre presents the Swedish premiere of the award-winning and critically acclaimed play  The Events by David Greig. Music by John Browne. Directed by Gary Whitaker.

    8 April- 30 April at Gothenburg English Studio Theatre

    4 May – 14 May at Kulturhuset, Stadsteatern Stockholm

    (Photo: Lina Ikse)

     

    Featuring local choirs, The Events tells a story of obsession, grief and forgiveness

    Claire, a liberal church minister, runs a community choir in a small seaside town.
    “…a choir that brought together vulnerable people, old people, asylum seekers, immigrant men, young mums and so on – it was a – the idea was – you can imagine. ”

     Claire, a liberal church minister, runs a community choir in a small seaside town.
    ”…a choir that brought together vulnerable people, old people, asylum seekers, immigrant men, young mums and so on – it was a – the idea was – you can imagine.”

    One day a boy with a gun walks in during a choir rehearsal resulting in devastating consequences. Claire becomes obsessed with the boy and the reasons for his actions. She looks for answers among the politicians that the boy associates himself with, his father, old classmates and, in the end, the boy himself. It’s a journey that takes her to the edge of reason, science, politics and faith.

    The Events has a strong relevance to today’s development of far right extremism in Sweden and Europe whilst also exploring how far forgiveness can stretch in the face of brutality. Different local community choirs will join the cast on stage for each performance in this rare, daring and beautiful new play.

    To find out more about GEST and upcoming theatre productions head to GEST.se

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    Nordic Bakery celebrates Cinnamon Bun Day

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 23rd September 2015
  • One of the best ways to experience a country is through its cuisine and one of the best ways to gauge how important tradition is to a country, is through the esteem in which it holds it traditions. So when people are curious about why there is a Cinnamon Bun Day (Kanelbullens dag) in Sweden, […]




    One of the best ways to experience a country is through its cuisine and one of the best ways to gauge how important tradition is to a country, is through the esteem in which it holds it traditions. So when people are curious about why there is a Cinnamon Bun Day (Kanelbullens dag) in Sweden, what they should really be acknowledging is just how proud the Swedes are of their heritage, offerings and identity. A Cinnamon Bun sums this up perfectly! The smells and taste involved in the making and execution, many Swedes away from home say conjure up childhood memories of these delights being made. It is also a very symbolic social thing as the Cinnamon Bun is often hand in hand with the other time old tradition, the Fika, which is a moment in the day to take time out have a coffee and a bun and sit with friends and family to not let the day slip by.

     

     

    With Nordic Bakery serving not only its Nordic community in and around London but many Nordophiles for miles around who started out curious and are now hooked on some of the sweet delicacies from our favourite Nordic countries, Nordic Bakery will be proudly flying the flag for Cinnamon Bun Day (Kanelbullens dag). Come and enjoy a perfectly crafted bun or any one of their other bites and involve yourself in the festivities from the 28th Sept to 4th Oct.

    The Cinnamon Bun has been around since the 1920’s and has been celebrated since 1999 so this is still a relatively new festival, however it is embraced wholeheartedly and is definitely a fun way for any Nordophile to join in.

    Nordic Bakery have kindly sent us a recipe for the Cinnamon Bun from Miisa Mink ‘The Nordic bakery Cookbook’ by Ryland, Peters, Small and they tell us a little bit about what we can expect over the week long celebrations

     

    Created for Nordic Bakery Cinnamon bun week of celebrations – a caramel and pecan cinnamon bun which will be on sale next week only.

     

    Nordic Bakery, the Scandinavian style premium coffee shop chain, is giving Londoners a taste extravaganza of cinnamon buns with a week-long cinnamon bun celebration at all three London coffee shops (from 28 September – October 2014). Fans travel from all over London and abroad for Nordic Bakery’s iconic cinnamon buns (applauded by Time Out, Vogue and Evening Standard). Now they can have their favourite taste in a five different flavours (including cinnamon bun with blueberry and cinnamon bun with chocolate) with a different variety available during the Monday to Friday of Cinnamon Bun Week. The celebrations reach a peak at the weekend, when fans can choose from all the cinnamon bun flavours

    Dough

    570ml lukewarm milk

    150g caster sugar

    45g fresh yeast (or easy baked dried yeast according to manufacturer’s instructions)

    1 tsp cardamom seeds, crushed with a pestle and mortar

    180g unsalted butter, melted

    1 egg

    1 kg plain flour

    Filling

    100g unsalted butter, softened at room temperature

    200g dark brown soft sugar

    3 Tbsp ground cinnamon

    Glaze

    85g caster sugar

    1 Tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice

    2 baking trays, lined with non-stick baking paper

     

    Nordic Bakery cinnamon bun and cappuccino (1)

     

    To make the dough, put the milk, sugar, yeast, cardamom, melted butter and egg in a food processor or mixer with a dough hook.  With the motor running, gradually add the flour until it is all incorporated and the dough has come together.

     

    Transfer the dough to a bowl, cover with a clean tea towel and leave to prove in a warm place for 1 hour, or until it has doubled in size.

     

    After 1 hour, punch down the dough and transfer onto a lightly floured surface. Using a rolling pin, roll it out until it is about 30 x 80cm and 7mm thick.

     

    For the filling, spread the butter evenly over the dough and sprinkle the sugar and cinnamon all over the top.

    Roll the dough up from a long side. Cut into roughly 6-cm rolls, but cut them at an angle – so, make the first cut diagonally, then the second cut about 6cm along diagonally in the opposite direction. You should get a roll that looks like a trapezium (or a triangle with the tip chopped off). Carefully transfer the buns to the prepared baking trays, with the longest edge of the bun sitting on the tray, cover with tea towers again and leave to prove in a warm place for 30-60 mins, until almost doubled in size.

     

    Preheat oven to 200C or 400F or Gas 6. Bake the buns in the preheated oven for 20-25min or until golden brown.

     

    To make the glaze, put the sugar, lemon juice and 100ml water in a small saucepan and bring to the boil. Simmer for 10-15 min, until slightly thickened. The glaze will still be quite watery.

     

    Remove the buns from the oven, transfer onto a wire rack and brush the glaze generously over them. Leave to cool before serving.

    Head over to Nordicbakery to find out more

     

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    The Nordic Council Film Prize 2015

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 31st August 2015
  • The Nordic Council Film Prize nominations for 2015 are out. The purpose of The Nordic Council Film Prize is to support the production of Nordic films in order to strengthen the Nordic film industry, thereby in the long term contributing to the strengthening of Nordic films internationally.     The winner will be a feature […]




    The Nordic Council Film Prize nominations for 2015 are out.

    The purpose of The Nordic Council Film Prize is to support the production of Nordic films in order to strengthen the Nordic film industry, thereby in the long term contributing to the strengthening of Nordic films internationally.

     

     

    The winner will be a feature film that is rooted in Nordic culture, is of high artistic quality and stands out through its artistic originality to form a harmonious work. Innovation within the film genre will also be given positive consideration when comparing the nominated films. The films nominated must primarily be recorded in a Nordic language to be considered for the Film Prize.

    The prize was awarded for the first time on a trial basis in 2002 in connection with the Nordic Council’s 50th anniversary. It became permanent in 2005 and has since been awarded along with the Nordic Council’s other prizes for music, literature, and nature and the environment.

     

    image_16_9_bigger (12)

    The Nordic Council Film Prize 2009 was awarded to the Danish film director and scriptwriter Lars von Trier and producer Meta Louise Foldager for the film ANTICHRIST.

     

    A member of the jury from every Nordic country

    Each Nordic country appoints one jury member and a substitute. These people are film connoisseurs but must be independent of the film industry in their home country and have no personal financial interest in the nominated films.

     

    Nordic Jury appoints the prize winner

    The national jury members form a Nordic Adjudication Committee. The national jury member proposes the nominations from his/her own country. The film nominations are made public at the beginning of September. After that it is the combined Nordic adjudication committee which decides which of the nominated films – one from each Nordic country – will win the prize.

    Films from the Faroe Islands, Greenland and Åland are outside the countries quota of one film each. Nominated films from these countries must be submitted to the Nordic Adjudication Committee. When a Faroese, Greenlandic or Ålandic film has to be judged a jury member from that country is co-opted onto the committee.

     

     

    Film prize divided between three main functions

    The Nordic Council Film Prize is administered by the Nordic Film and TV Fund and is worth DKK 350,000 (approx. €47,000), and thus has the same value as the literature, nature and the environment, and music prizes. The prize money is to be shared between the scriptwriter, the director and the producer, which underlines that film as an art form is the result of close co-operation between these three main functions.

    The Film Prize is usually awarded with the other Nordic prizes for literature, music and nature and the environment during the Nordic Council’s Ordinary Session in the autumn at a special ceremony.

    Previous winners of the Film Prize include Danish Per Fly’s film ‘Drabet’ (‘Manslaughter’) and the film ‘Zozo’ by Josef Fares from Sweden.

     

    The Nordic Council Film Prize Nominations 2015

     

    film-331553_640

     

    Stille hjerte (Silent Heart) – Denmark

     

    Masterfully crafted and played to perfection, director Bille August and screenwriter Christian Torpe tell a warm-hearted story about an unforgettable weekend where a family has to deal with a mother’s wish to die. In the typically Nordic tradition of exorcising all skeletons from the closet, the film dissects one of the most difficult challenges a family can face – saying goodbye to a loved one.

     

    He ovat paenneet (They Have Escaped) – Finland

     

    A gripping coming-of-age drama, a thrilling road movie, a drug-induced fantasy and then some! Jukka-Pekka Valkeapää’s They Have Escaped flirts with genre characteristics only to rise above their respective dynamics and to metamorphose into an expressionistic, no holds barred adult fairytale. The exquisite cinematography combined with a thoughtful, multifaceted soundtrack adds to film’s strong, dreamlike ambiance.

     

    Fúsi (Virgin Mountain) – Iceland

     

    With a delicate touch, director Dagur Kári´s Virgin Mountain is a moving coming-of-age portrait of a gentle giant. In a skilfully nuanced way this humanistic film conveys both inner torment and offbeat charm, while its symbolic interaction of items big and small conveys such universal themes as goodness, giving and grace.

     

    Mot naturen (Out of Nature) – Norway

     

    In Out of Nature, Ole Giæver portrays a self-reflection of our modern lives and today’s Nordic man. A personal yet forthright narrative conveys a collage of mental imagery to express memories, hopes, dreams, and emotive atmospheres, yet all in a good humour that addresses embarrassment, shame and pain.

     

    Gentlemen- Sweden

     

    Gentlemen takes us on a winding journey of a story in which time perspectives and identities are as fluid as the boundary between dreams and fantasy. The attention to detail in the film’s various expressions culminates in a uniquely personal, playful and self-reflective work.

    Photos & text credited to Norden.org

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    Swedish composer – B Tommy Andersson

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 28th August 2015
  • Swedish composer B Tommy Andersson is the Composer-in -Association for BBC NOW for the 2014/15 Season. His last big piece to be performed by them is a new commission from the BBC to be premiered at the BBC Proms on 3 September 2015. Pan is the piece to be performed: The music is inspired by the […]




    Swedish composer B Tommy Andersson is the Composer-in -Association for BBC NOW for the 2014/15 Season. His last big piece to be performed by them is a new commission from the BBC to be premiered at the BBC Proms on 3 September 2015.

    Pan is the piece to be performed:

    The music is inspired by the ancient Greek myths about the god Pan; the god of Nature, of the Wild, of Shepherds, and of Rustic Music. He is also known for his sexual powers and for playing the pan pipe. The large organ is used as an element in the orchestration. In a way, the organ becomes sort of a gigantic pan pipe, representing the god Pan.

     

    B Tommy Andersson 3 (72dpi)

     

    Nordophile wanted to know about this Swedish music master who composes and conducts throughout the world.

    B Tommy Andersson was composing music at the age of 11. At that point it was mostly small pieces for one or two violins, but he soon became interested in writing pieces on a larger scale. The first piece of Andersson’s music performed in public was the Prelude and Fugue in F major for organ, performed by Lars-Erik Bernvill in Sandhult Church, 20 May 1979.

     

    preludium-kopia2

     

    At fourteen years old, he started to study orchestration with a local conductor in Borås, Jan-Anders Eriksson, who generously gave his time and advice to his young student. He also studied harmony and counterpoint with an elderly military band leader, Arne Ask. In the spring of 1980, a larger orchestral piece, Trolle-Ljungby Horn och Pipa, was performed by the local youth symphony orchestra in Borås. This, of course, inspired Tommy to learn even more about composition. During the Borås years, the local music school continuously commissioned him to write musical arrangements and he had many opportunities to listen to what he had composed or arranged.

     

    julen-1981

     

     

    During his high school years in Borås, he also studied composition with composer Sven-Eric Johanson in Gothenburg (1981—83). Andersson was quite productive during these years (writing about 25 compositions), considering that he also went through high school and in addition, played several instruments. The studies with Johanson focused on counterpoint in Palestrina-style (according to Knud Jeppesens textbook), twelve-tone technique (according to Ernst Krenek’s principles) and Paul Hindemith’s Unterweisung im Tonsatz.

    In the course of his studies in the music teacher’s class in Stockholm, from the Autumn of 1983, he took composition lessons with Hans Eklund and Professor Sven-David Sandström. At first, he continued to compose regularly and received several commissions. During the years 1991—2001, B. Tommy Andersson was focusing on establishing his conducting career. That is the reason why so few pieces were composed during this period. Nevertheless, three larger works were created; the Horn Concerto, Apollo — the successful concerto for solo percussion and orchestra, written in 1995 for Markus Leoson, and Satyricon. Furthermore, quite a few arrangements, orchestrations, transcriptions for symphonic band and adaptations for chamber orchestra were made during these ten years.

     

     

    Since the turn of the century, his music has increasingly attracted more attention and several larger pieces have been commissioned and performed. Among these, we find an opera, orchestral pieces, and choral pieces. In April 2009, the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra in Stockholm gave a festival entirely dedicated to the music of B Tommy Andersson. During four days, 24 of his compositions were performed in Stockholm Concert Hall. It was a great success, just like the CD Satyricon, which was released in 2009 and received highest possible acclaim from the critics.

     

    Interview

    We are really interested in hearing how you first discovered your talent for composing and conducting? Do you feel the two go hand in hand with having such an understanding of music?

    When I was eight years old, I was given the opportunity to learn to play an instrument in the local music school in the city Borås (a city situated 60 km west of Gothenburg), where I grew up. Like everybody else, I had to start with the recorder, but then I switched to the violin. In those days, all children were offered this possibility for free, which tells a lot about the kind of society Sweden was in the 1970’s. Had this not been the case, it is not at all certain that I would have come into the world of classical music, since there was no tradition of music in my family.

    In the music school, I met several enthusiastic and inspiring people, who opened my eyes and ears to classical music. By coincidence, the municipal library happened to have a large collection of orchestral scores, a result of a donation, which I happened to notice. For me, the discovery of the connection between the music I listened to and the notation in the scores was exhilarating. I listened a lot to classical music on the radio, which gave me access to a wide repertory. The classical channel (P2) was a really fantastic thing for me, since in those days, prior to the easy access everybody has today through Internet, it was very expensive and difficult to get to hear the music you wanted to get to know. Before long I systematically borrowed the scores to the music that was broadcast, and I followed the music in the score as I was listening.

    For some reason, this inspired me to try to compose my own pieces. In the beginning, when I was around eleven years old, it was small pieces for one or two violins, which I played together with my violin teacher. But one thing led to another, and shortly I tried to compose bigger pieces. Through the music school I received wonderful help from enthusiastic teachers to learn the craft and I was also given lots of opportunities to hear my music played, which is, of course, the ultimate inspiration to continue composing.

    Before I left Borås, at age 19, for studies at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm, I had already been able to listen to many of my own pieces, also some orchestral works. By then, I had also conducted my own music on some occasions, and somehow it became clear that I had a talent for conducting.

    My original intention was to try to become a professional composer. But in the early 1980’s, the prevalent style of new music was much more modernistic than I was comfortable with, and I realized that it would become tough for me to become successful as a composer, so after a while I put more time and energy into trying to become a professional conductor instead.

    Times have changed, however, and since the mid 1990’s the scene for contemporary music is open to a wider spectrum of musical styles. Suddenly, my music has become increasingly appreciated and I have taken up composition again.

    For me, the combination of being conductor and composer is really successful, since the two roles are closely related. I learn new things about music and composition every time I conduct, particularly during the rehearsals, and the experience as a conductor gives insights in music-making that is invaluable for a composer.

     

    Coming from Sweden how have you seen the arts appreciated and encouraged there?

    Sweden is, like all the other Nordic countries, situated on the outskirts of Europe. Because of this, it took more time for cultural phenomena to reach us in the 18th and 19th centuries. As a result of this, it was not until the 20th century, particularly the second half of it, that a proper infrastructure for classical music was built up, in the form of several professional orchestras and opera houses.

    The state support for art, theatre, literature, and music has been strong since WWII. It’s not until the last decade that neoliberal ideas has become involved in the discussion about cultural financing. Despite severe cuts in the culture budgets in many countries around the world, the cultural institutions in Sweden have so far remained rather intact.

     

    Boras

     

    • Can you tell us a little bit about your new commission for the BBC, Pan, which is to be performed at the BBC Proms September 3rd?

    The piece is inspired by the ancient Greek myths about the god Pan; the god of Nature, of the Wild, of Shepherds and of Rustic Music. He is also known for his sexual powers and for playing the pan pipe. Pan is sometimes depicted as a rather small and not very attractive being, horned and goat-like. On the other hand, he could also be rendered as an imposing, beautiful, and seductive man, albeit with some characteristic features like horns and a tail. Regardless of his appearance, he is to be reckoned as a powerful force of nature. The word “panic” (Panikon) was used by the ancient Greeks to describe the feeling of fear that was incited to men and animals alike when they sensed that Pan was nearby.

    The organ is used as an element in the orchestration and it becomes a gigantic pan pipe, representing the god Pan. The loud organ is a manifestation of the immense power that the god possesses, and at the same time the panic that he stirs around himself.

    Despite rather illustrative musical characters, the music is by no means programme music in the sense that it tells a story. I have been influenced by several different representations of Pan, from old Graeco-Roman pictures and statues, paintings of Nicolas Poussin, and also more contemporary artwork, such as the images by the Italian painter Roberto Ferri.

     

    How did your relationship with the BBC come about?

    It is a direct result of that the Danish principal conductor of BBC National Orchestra of Wales, Thomas Søndergård, likes my music. He wanted me to be Composer-in-Association with his orchestra for one year, and there we are.

     

    What do you have coming up after this?

    In terms of composition, I’m working on a violin concerto right now. When it’s finished, it will be followed by a couple of choral works, and after that my second opera. Besides composing, I have several conducting engagements, and I am also Professor of Orchestral Conducting at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm.

     

    BBC_Proms_31

     

    Find out more about the BBC Proms, 3rd September BBC.co.uk/proms

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    Short film – Happy Thoughts

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 28th July 2015
  • 10842218_1594978707412800_1924650185458717261_o

    Nordophile heard about the short film – Happy Thoughts which was shot in Sala, Sweden. It has no spoken dialogue, only music and the actors ability to convey the story through motion.     We spoke with the American writer of Happy Thoughts, Kimberly Durley and she not only spoke with passion about her film but […]




    Nordophile heard about the short film – Happy Thoughts which was shot in Sala, Sweden. It has no spoken dialogue, only music and the actors ability to convey the story through motion.

     

    10842218_1594978707412800_1924650185458717261_o

     

    We spoke with the American writer of Happy Thoughts, Kimberly Durley and she not only spoke with passion about her film but also gave great praise for all of her Nordic team who have made this short film one to watch. From her Swedish Director of Photography Jonas Nyren, who is a 23 year old filmmaker/writer/director/actor from Vittninge, Sweden, to the gaffer and lighting tech Nataniel Matias from Gothenburg who is currently attending film school at Tarna Folkhogskola.

     

    11130099_1605439936366677_3729627661919238135_n

     

     

    Happy Thoughts was filmed entirely at the train station in Sala, Sweden. You may have heard of Sala before if you have heard of the TV Nordic Supernatural drama “Jordskott”. Jordskott was also filmed in Sala and Kimberly worked on the show as part of the scenography team for most of last year.

     

    Sala_station_2010

     

     

    Music is extremely important to the film and adds to the telling of the story. Both music and sound were done by Daniel Johnsson, a Swedish troubadour and Gustaf Grefberg a Swedish sound engineer and musician. Kimberly explained  “The film has no dialogue, so the majority of its feel landed on these guys”. Gustaf was a pretty big part of the evolution of synth music in Sweden and he was one of the original members of Starbreeze Studios. He now works for Hazelight with Josef Fares making video games.  Daniel is the founder of Aardia, a music group from Sundsvall Sweden, and he’s a well sought-after troubadour as well.

     

     

    Group_Photo

     

    Synopsis:

    Stan has never felt so lonely or so hopeless. Life has landed him in the worst position he could ever imagine and now it is all he can do to keep himself from drowning in his bitterness at the world. That is, until Joy comes along and shines a little ray of sunlight into his dreary existence by giving him hot coffee on a cold morning, in a hand colored mug. This small act of kindness kindles a unique relationship between them which just might bring Stan to a greater understanding of how love, compassion and even joy can be found even in the most unexpected circumstances.

     

    Actors

     

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    Kristofer is a musician and filmmaker who goes by the name of Kristofer “Waxblend” Hedström is 31 and lives in the South of Sweden. He grew up in Sala where the short film “Happy Thoughts” was filmed. When he’s not acting/producing he makes hip-hop music under the Waxblend moniker. He is also studying business economy. He has  a passion for creating stuff, whether it’s music, film or just writing something.

    Magdalena Eriksson studied method acting at Folkuniversitetet, Stockholm. In 2007 she started working in the film industry as a makeup artist and did that for many years. Later on she wanted to try acting, got an education in method acting and loved it. So Magdalena quit doing makeup and started acting instead. The part as Joy in Happy thoughts was a real challenge though because there are no actual lines, the acting depends only on body language and facial expressions, hard but fun and educating. She enjoyed every minute of being Joy and being a part of bringing Kimberly’s beautiful story to life. Upcoming projects: A Web series, Timewars ll. Shooting starts in the autumn of 2015, and a feature, 1%- the voice within, shooting starts 2016.

     

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    Find out more  Facebook/Happythoughts/shortfilm &  whitebridges.se

     

     

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    Cooper & Wolf

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 23rd July 2015
  • In need of a Fika? Want to discover more about Sweden through its food? Or just want to see what all the buzz about Nordic eateries is which is?     Nordophile is very pleased to of found an authentic Swedish place who can answer all of your questions in one go! Cooper & Wolf first opened […]




    In need of a Fika? Want to discover more about Sweden through its food? Or just want to see what all the buzz about Nordic eateries is which is?

     

     

    Nordophile is very pleased to of found an authentic Swedish place who can answer all of your questions in one go!

    Cooper & Wolf first opened its doors in 2012 and it serves honest home cooked Swedish food and serves coffee

    They are a family run café/restaurant, offering breakfast and lunch seven days a week in the heart of Clapton, overlooking Millfields Park.

     

     

    They are proud to offer a menu of honest home cooked Swedish food inspired by head chef Paul and owner Sara’s family recipes, going back by generations. Dishes include Swedish meatballs, fresh fish and vegetarian options. Using quality seasonal produce, we pickle our own herring and make our gravlax (cured salmon) in-house.

    Every day they offer a “Dagens” daily special from the menu.

     

     

    They bake their own Swedish cinnamon buns (Kanelbullar) and a selection of cakes daily.

    They’re passionate about coffee using beans from Caravan’s Roastery in Kings Cross espresso based coffees from their beautiful Synesso machine and a changing weekly selection of single origin beans at the pour over bar all served by head barista James and co.

    They also offer a lovely selection of teas from their friends at ‘Make Tea not War

     

    cooper

    www.cooperandwolf.co.uk

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    Nordic Supernatural

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 13th July 2015
  • Saraochmats01_fotoMagnusLiamKarlsson

    Nordophile has noticed an engrossment in Nordic Supernatural recently and we wanted to look closer at the amalgamation of different genres within the Nordic category. Nordic Noir is a genre which has exploded into the homes of Nordophiles everywhere. Nordic murder and intrigue has gone global as a genre, but there has recently been an […]




    Nordophile has noticed an engrossment in Nordic Supernatural recently and we wanted to look closer at the amalgamation of different genres within the Nordic category.

    Nordic Noir is a genre which has exploded into the homes of Nordophiles everywhere. Nordic murder and intrigue has gone global as a genre, but there has recently been an interest for readers to find out what other genres Nordic authors are producing.

    With the rising obsession for dramas coming our way like Jordskott from Sweden which is both supernatural and mythical, we are now questioning which books can feed our Nordic passion if we don’t just want Noir.

     

     

    Nordophile is taken by two very talented writers, Sara B. Elfgren and Mats Strandberg from Sweden who have done just that. Teaming up they have co-wrote a supernatural, mythology trilogy from the depths of the Nordic heartland (Bergslagen, Sweden) to bring us not just your typical Nordic, dark, intense novel full of transgressions and subtle undertones of social malfunctions but this writing duo have expanded the subject and added the element of supernatural realism where this thread seems to run adjacent with everyday life. The writers have thought this through and not just taken the chance to just take a different path, because you get the feeling that this is a subject they believe in, one they want to filter through, making a natural impact. Nordic Supernatural looks like it’s slowly starting to work its way up with its counterparts and we expect much more of the coming months.

     

    Saraochmats01_fotoMagnusLiamKarlsson

     

    The Engelsfors Trilogy

    This trilogy contains the titles THE CIRCLE, FIRE and THE KEY. THE CIRCLE was published in April 2011 in Sweden, FIRE in April 2012 and the final part, THE KEY was published in Sweden autumn 2013.

     

    THE CIRCLE

    6 young girls who just started high school, and who have nothing in common, find out they are hunted by an ancient evil. Involuntarily they are all drawn to a meeting in the forest one late night when the moon is mysteriously red. They are told that they are witches. They are ‘The Chosen Ones’. From this day on, they must learn how to work together despite their differences and they have to master the forces that have awakened within them. Time is running out. Something is hunting them and if they don’t find it and defeat it, it will find them.

                                                  

    FIRE

    ‘The Chosen Ones’ ones are about to start their second year in senior high school. The whole summer break they have held their breaths waiting for the demons’ next move. But the threat shows up from another direction, somewhere they could never have foreseen. It becomes more and more obvious that something is very, very wrong in Engelsfors. The past is woven together with the present. The living meet the dead. The Chosen ones are tied even closer together and are once again reminded that magic cannot ease unhappy love or mend broken hearts.

                               

    THE KEY

    The final title in the trilogy is THE KEY.  The threads and paths are woven together, and the finale is fantastic as the girls and others involved manage to stop the apocalypse.

     

    The trilogy has gone global and the interest for The Circle has been huge from day one. The rights are now sold to 29 countries.

     

    cirklen

     

    Genre

    The books are written as crossover titles and aims for young adults and teenagers. But the way they are written they can easily be read by adults as well which from readership seems to be true, it appeals to a wide range audience. One big difference from other books in this genre of paranormal titles is that it’s not the story about pretty girl meets dangerous boy/man (ie vampire). Instead, the main characters are six strong and brave young girls struggling to find themselves and to do good.

     

    Publisher                                                                                             

    As soon as Rabén & Sjögren, one of Sweden’s leading publisher of children’s  and YA books,  laid eyes on the script they wanted to publish the trilogy, and invested big in the whole trilogy from day one with a first print run of 12 000 copies, which is very high for Sweden. As of today, the first book in the trilogy has sold 140 000 copies in Sweden alone.

     

    Film 

    The film rights for THE ENGELSFORS TRILOGY were sold to the new film production company RMV Film, owned and run by former ABBA-member Benny Andersson and his son Ludvig Andersson.  Mats Strandberg and Sara B. Elfgren both took an active part in the project. Sara B. Elfgren wrote the script together with director Levan Akin. The film aired in Sweden in February 2015 and July 8th 2015 it was released on dvd and blueray in Sweden.

     

    cirklen1

     

    Find out more worldofengelsfors.com

    Photos Magnus Liam Karlsson & Niklas Alexandersson.

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    Bageriet – Swedish Bakery, London

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 8th July 2015
  • bageriet

    Nordophile has been watching the trend on all things Nordic spread throughout London and the one thing which best shows off the Nordic traditions, way of life and customs, is food. Nordic food normally has a story to tell in its ingredients and the process it goes through. So with more and more Nordic cafes/restaurants/bakeries […]




    Nordophile has been watching the trend on all things Nordic spread throughout London and the one thing which best shows off the Nordic traditions, way of life and customs, is food. Nordic food normally has a story to tell in its ingredients and the process it goes through. So with more and more Nordic cafes/restaurants/bakeries popping up in and around London, we wanted to go back to basics. To a method and tradition which encapsulates good old fashioned Nordic baking. This brought us to Bageriet! and we spoke with Daniel Karlsson to find out more.
    bageriet
    Bageriet is the Swedish word meaning The Bakery
    I started the bakery “Bageriet”in 2011 as an online bakery, stocking the the Swedish grocer on 32 Crawford street”totallyswedish” with a variety  of bagged biscuits and cinnamon buns.
    that went very well and I noticed a huge interest in Swedish bread tradition amongst the English customers so in 2013 I teamed up with my friend and super colleague from Sweden, Sven-gunnar and so we opened the shop on 24 rose street.
    We have enjoyed since then a very good two years and such a good response from the Londoners and we are very much enjoying being ambassadors for Swedish bread and cake traditions here in the UK.
    We bake everything at site in the basement bakery with very good ingredients,most of them shipped from Sweden.
    Most of our recipes are from our families and are very traditional. So when you come to us you can be sure of experiencing something genuine and Swedish.
    For our customers we also offer traditional soft drinks like sockerdricka, hallonsoda and päronsoda which probably even my grandparents were enjoying in their youth.
    Even the music we play in the shop is a selection of old and new from Swedish artists.
    So I think its fair to say we are good Swedish ambassadors

    bagerietphoto Daniel Karlsson/Sven-Gunnar Appelgren. Photo © Joe Sarah


    Daniel Karlsson Owner.

    The Pastry chef
    My career in pastry started when I was 20 years old and I began three years of excellent training at the HRS school in Gothenburg, Sweden, including a year of work experience in a professional bakery.

    As with many passionate chefs, a foodie mother or grandparent inspired them to choose their profession. In this case my mother and especially so my grandmother, Harriet Karlsson, lit the spark in me. She was an extraordinary good cook and sweet maker. I cherish what she taught me and still use some of her biscuit recipes.

    Being a baker or pastry chef is a wonderful profession if you are passionate. For me, it is a real joy to create sweets, cakes, bread, etc.

    I came to London and England because I was curious of the British culture, which in these of my first four years I’ve grown to love. Now, I want to realise my dream to share the passion of my craft and the wonderful Swedish cake tradition of which I am very proud.

    Bageriet_3

    Head over to Bageriet.co.uk

     

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    Örebro OpenArt 2015

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 30th June 2015
  • openart

    OpenART is Scan­di­navia’s biggest public art bien­nial, running for twelve weeks in Örebro, Sweden. With its fifth edition in 2015 (Örebro OpenArt 14th June-6th September) OpenART commits once again to turning the city upside down, with art that will surprise, intrigue and inspire.     Contem­po­rary art from all over the world is temporarily displayed in […]




    OpenART is Scan­di­navia’s biggest public art bien­nial, running for twelve weeks in Örebro, Sweden. With its fifth edition in 2015 (Örebro OpenArt 14th June-6th September) OpenART commits once again to turning the city upside down, with art that will surprise, intrigue and inspire.

     

    openart

     

    Contem­po­rary art from all over the world is temporarily displayed in the city center, for everyone to expe­ri­ence without an admis­sion ticket. The public space becomes under OpenART an inten­sively shared space, that people acknowledge, re-expe­ri­ence and re-collect. Addi­tion­ally, OpenART takes a broad leap into the public arena, with projects and activ­i­ties that reach out to a diverse public. Guided tours, activ­i­ties for chil­dren and young people, as well as special events are avail­able for everyone under the summer of 2015.

    When OpenART’s in town, the cityscape is lifted to a vibrant dimen­sion, where art seems to peek-a-boo at passersby. People will encounter art in places they least expect it every­where in the city center – in the streets, shop windows, facades, on the water surface, around the castle or in parks. The great thing is that the artworks are in within 10-minute walking radius from Örebro castle, making the exhi­bi­tion easily acces­sible by foot or bike.

    Every edition, OpenART exhibits about 100 artworks, created by contem­po­rary artists, locally and inter­na­tion­ally known. Iconic creations like BadBad Boy (Tommi Toija, 2013), The Big Yellow Rabbit (Floren­tijn Hofman, 2011), Bunny Project (Conny Bloom, 2009) and Spectacle Agnostico (Kent Karlsson, 2008) have infused small- and large-scale fantasy into the public space, making head­lines in the inter­na­tional media.

     

    chineseart

    photo; Al Weiwei, Xu Bing, Song dong at OpenART

     

    In 2015, OpenART show­cases 72 artists who exhibit 130 artworks on more than 70 venues indoors and outdoors.

    OpenART chal­lenges percep­tions of what art is, building bridges between cultures and people, while fostering local and inter­na­tional art dialogue.

    It all started in 2008, when two rebel hearts and devoted art freaks decided to give people an alter­na­tive art space, one that would be expe­ri­enced not only phys­i­cally; a space that people would acknowl­edge, relive and recol­lect; a space that would remain in the collec­tive conscience and that would be sacredly kept at the heart of the public. Art for every­body, in the city center – this was the idea that sparked a long-term collab­o­ra­tion and friend­ship between Mats Nilsson, then Head of the city’s art gallery and Lars Jonsson, a recently Örebro-relo­cated artist.

    2008 The Art Gallery organizes the first OpenART
    Mats and Lars started working together at the art gallery in 2007. That year, the gallery received a new policy direc­tive to display art in uncon­ven­tional places.

    “And then it struck us. Lars and I both wanted to the same thing – an exciting project that would put cutting-edge art on display in public loca­tions in Örebro”, says Mats.

    As a result, OpenART started in the summer of 2008. The first edition featured 71 artists, mostly from Scan­di­navia, whose works were exhib­ited anywhere from hidden corners down­town Örebro to shop windows, on rooftops or on the surface of river Svartån. It became popular among the people in no time. A surprise came already in 2008, when OpenART was awarded the “Surprise of the Year” award (Årets över­raskning) at Örebro­galan.

     

    2008

     

    2009 OpenART grows

    In 2009, the confir­ma­tion that OpenART was becoming inter­na­tional came once the artist selec­tion process begun. Appli­ca­tions from many parts of the world came pouring in. Örebro was taking its first step on the world’s cultural map as an exciting art plat­form.

     

    2011

     

    2011 A Big Yellow Rabbit

    At its third edition in 2011, OpenART made head­lines in the inter­na­tional media, after a gigantic bunny was dropped in Örebro’s central square, its tail against the sculp­ture of Engel­brekt Engel­brek­tsson, one of Sweden’s greatest national heroes. Floren­tijn Hofman’s Big Yellow Rabbit became an icon, loved by many and condemned by some due to its loca­tion. The love for the city’s big rabbit went as far as deter­mining a group of people to campaign for saving it from disman­tle­ment.

    The campaign to save the rabbit did not succeed. Mats Nilsson explained in an interview with The Tele­graph that “We are not interested in having the rabbit reduced to a commercial gimmick.”

    After a successful 2011, Mats Nilsson received Örebro Spar­banks’ culture schol­ar­ship for his involve­ment in the exhi­bi­tion.

     

    big-yellow-rabbit-by-florentijn-hofman-top

     

    2013 Largest Scandinavia

    Following a new polit­ical deci­sion, OpenART became an orga­ni­za­tion of its own in 2013. It has since func­tioned as an inde­pen­dent project within the Munic­i­pality of Örebro. The event is real­ized in close coop­er­a­tion with the City Art Gallery, Örebro County Museum and Konst­främ­jandet Bergslagen.

    Bene­fiting from great support from part­ners, OpenART devel­oped diverse projects meant to actively involve a wider audi­ence in a dialogue with art. Besides guided tours, projects for chil­dren and young people, as well as programs for artists in all stages of their careers have taken place under OpenART. Two such projects are OpenART Kids and OpenART Academy.

    In 2013, OpenART estab­lished itself as the biggest public art bien­nial in Scan­di­navia, featuring more than 100 works by 71 artists from all over the world, OpenART Kids, OpenART Academy, guided tours and special night tours, as well as special events. Almost all OpenART activ­i­ties are free of charge.

     

    2013

     

    2015 Big focus on Contemporary Chinese Art

    At the fifth edition of OpenART, a special focus is on Contem­po­rary Chinese Art. A unique cura­to­rial collab­o­ra­tion between inde­pen­dent art curator Feng Boyi and OpenART Director Lars Jonnson sees thir­teen contem­po­rary artists from China preparing artworks for unprece­dented exhi­bi­tions, symbol­i­cally enti­tled “Encounter” and “No Holds Barred”. Ai Weiwei, Xu Bing and Song Dong are among the partic­i­pants.

    OpenART 2015 has received a record interest, with 450 artists from more than 70 coun­tries sending in appli­ca­tions. In 2015, OpenART show­cases some 130 artworks, created by 72 artists from 19 coun­tries. The artworks will be exhib­ited on more than 70 venues across city center.

     

    A few of the Artists

     

    Åsa Andersson Born 1965 in Stock­holm, Sweden. Lives and works in Stock­holm, Sweden
    From series: The Cherry Blossom Sanatorium – Video, objects, prints/photographs, light.

    The Cherry Blossom Sanatorium is a ‘work in progress’ name for different works presented in art contexts, prose and poetry writing and illustrated talks.

    Artist Statement

    Raking in the autumn, I am stunned by wonder. The start of buds. Silk, wounds of resin. I barely dare to cross the ground.

    Spring. Small protrusions glisten in the wind, falling down towards the source. Down there, in the soil – all these little ghosts. If I touch a blossom, quickly on its way, a pirouette, and then as I said, down. A part of me is also carried down to the source. I actually believe this. All small ghosts live in the soil.

    The Cherry Blossom Sanatorium – the name appears despite the difficulty in pronouncing it. I do not know if it is intended for only blossoms, or if others can be taken in or sign up. Or if the blossoms themselves act as host? I will investigate this. They do also carry a marvellous light.

    In Japan, one can find cherry blossom tea. The petals are dark pink with salt powdered around. The grains have absorbed the spring. My purchased package remains unbroken for a long time. Somebody said the tea tasted like tears.

    www.powder4context.com

     

    AsaAndersson

     

    Johan Suneson Born 1963 in Västan­fors, Sweden. Lives and works in Malmö, Sweden

    Elephants, Flamingos. The animal sculptures consist of incomplete bodies, where visitors can step in and replace the parts that are missing. In this way one can merge with the animals, and for a moment change his or her perspective. The exotic animals are sculptured in a round style, reminiscent of animated interpretations or soft toys. They constitute a comment on empathizing with things, but they also an association with play.

    Artist Statement

    In art, there is freedom and fantasy. Art is a part of reality. It can be a statement and an invitation. It can arouse the viewer’s memories or lead to speculation. I want my sculptures and paintings to look homemade and strange. I want the viewer to feel that there are different ways of looking at things. It is good if art can remind us that perspectives can and will differ.

     

    johansuenson

     

    Cecilia Jansson Born 1975 in Lund, Sweden. Lives and works in Örebro, Sweden.

    Now (2015) Video projection (duration 1 hour), sound and ornate plates from prison in a container 6-12 meters depending on space.
    Now is an attempt to transfer the viewers to the corridor under the high security prison in Kumla. The corridor is decorated by artists and inmates, both recently and in the 70ties. The title Now refers to the inmates’ lack of patience that I experienced while working with this decoration project.

    Time moves very slow there. They want things to happen now, not tomorrow, not the next week, but now. One of the reasons could be that they are waiting for so many things already that one more thing feels almost unbearable. The installation shows the everyday life in this long corridor that connects the buildings in the prison. You can look at some of the beautiful art made by the inmates, but if you want action, you have to learn to wait.

    Artist Statement

    My works are dealing with the value of people’s identity. I want to explore what preconceptions and prejudices are hidden in our need to put people in groups. I have made art with, for or about some of the hidden, forgotten or ignored groups in society. I want to make people consider the fact that every group is made of individuals with unique personalities. The need to put labels on people is worth investigating. What is the label good for?

     

    cecilliajansson

     

    Photos and text credited to Openart.se and the artists mentioned above.

    Contact claudia.pricop@orebro.se for further information.

     

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    Chase & Sorensen – Scandinavian in Hackney

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 22nd June 2015
  • chase2

    Nordophile was in search of Scandinavian modern furniture to showcase to you something which wasn’t on the cusp of extortionate, nor for it to be one of the masses, which adorn the homes of a majority of Scandinavian furniture searching Nordophiles. So we were delighted to find in the depths of Hackney, East London, Chase & Sorensen. Created […]




    Nordophile was in search of Scandinavian modern furniture to showcase to you something which wasn’t on the cusp of extortionate, nor for it to be one of the masses, which adorn the homes of a majority of Scandinavian furniture searching Nordophiles.

    So we were delighted to find in the depths of Hackney, East London, Chase & Sorensen. Created by duo Brent Chase and Signe Sorensen who have realised that the middle of these two extremes is a realistic need for customers, when in search of Scandinavian wares, for their home.

    In the midst of very high interest in all Nordic genres, this established shop is the place to come to, whether by foot or internet.

    Scandinavian luxury needn’t be out of reach. From the 1940’s to the New Nordic, Chase & Sorensen is bringing to this retro part of London a different slice of Scandinavia to indulge in.

     

     

    chase&sorensen

     

    CHASE & SORENSEN is a contemporary and mid 20th century Scandinavian modern furniture and home décor retailer. Founded in 2010 by American/Danish duo Brent Chase and Signe Sorensen and based in Hackney, East London, their mission is to offer a sensible alternative to the prohibitively expensive vintage furniture stores dotted across London as well as the low-quality, flat-packed, identikit furniture retailers.

     

    chase4

     

    Chase & Sorensen initially began trading in August 2010 with a successful stall in London’s iconic Brick Lane weekend market and an online store at chaseandsorensen.com In September 2011 the company opened it’s doors to their showroom in the heart of Hackney, offering up all of the quality design pieces they had garnered a reputation for. Prices are kept competitive by eliminating the middleman in the stock sourcing process as the owners make monthly trips to Denmark where they handpick the entire inventory. All items are carefully selected for their keeping with the Scandinavian modern design aesthetic and not simply for the designer name attached.

     

    chase1

     

    Chase & Sorensen has a mixed offering of 20th-century furniture and home décor. The ever-changing collection includes a variety of reasonably priced sofas, lounge chairs, dining sets and storage units, through to lighting, ceramics and art.

    All items in-store generally date from the 1940s to the 1970s and typically hail from Denmark, Sweden and Norway. Contemporary Scandinavian design Chase & Sorensen also stocks a growing range of modern design from Scandinavia. Established brands such as Royal Copenhagen and ArchitectMade are available alongside smaller indie brands such as FramaCPH, H Skjalm P and Zweed. Their collection of contemporary design continues to grow rapidly location summary set in East London’s Hackney Downs area,

     

    chase2

     

    CHASE & SORENSEN is centrally located between Dalston, London Fields and Clapton. The location is also easily accessed via public transport (multiple bus and overground train links minutes away).

    Contact Tel: 0208 533 5523

    Web: www.chaseandsorensen.com

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