Nordophile attends Norwegian Night in Utrecht

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  • 29th September 2015
  • A Nordic fairytale in…Utrecht? As a Dutch copywriter – editor – journalist I don’t usually write in English, but when Nordophile’s Sarah Surgey – whom I ‘met’ on Instagram – asked me to cover the Nordic Delight Festival in my hometown Utrecht I thought: why not give it a try! The undiscovered culture of Northern […]




    A Nordic fairytale in…Utrecht?

    As a Dutch copywriter – editor – journalist I don’t usually write in English, but when Nordophile’s Sarah Surgey – whom I ‘met’ on Instagram – asked me to cover the Nordic Delight Festival in my hometown Utrecht I thought: why not give it a try! The undiscovered culture of Northern Europe brought to an innovating local music venue in the centre of a historical university town. It might be a positive new experience to a middle-aged guy (54) like me, normally covering city development and architecture. Well…I can tell you now, it was an experience more than worthwhile.

    Utsolgt’

     

     

    Not only did the unexpected request from Nordophile’s Sarah Surgey to cover the Nordic Delight Festival trigger my interest, I was also intrigued as to the fact that the festival at first did not get any attention in what’s called ‘Uitagenda Utrecht’, which claims to give full insight in cultural events across the city. Woud this affect the success of this relatively small festival, still unknown to many? Probably not, with around 300 visitors the 2014 edition in EKKO was ‘utsolgt’, Norwegian for sold out! Not a mainstream festival, Nordic Delight isn’t the first that brings high-caliber performers to the picturesque city of Utrecht. Until recently it was Summer Darkness that turned Utrecht gothic-black in a more than special gathering of spirits once every year since 2003. And November this year it’s Le Guess Who? that again welcomes international upcoming bands and artists as well as international visitors. The initiative for a Nordic Delight Festival in Utrecht started in 2013. Founding fathers Arne Dee and Ad Pontier successfully organized two festivals and several events in Utrecht since then, always focused on Scandinavian music and culture. This September 26 Nordic Delight again offered a chance to experience the most talented upcoming music acts, from Norway this time, for the first time in the Netherlands.

     

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    Getting tuned

    Not being much of a Nordophile myself the complete line up was unknown to me. Live performances by Fay Wildhagen, Emilie Nicolas and Bloody Beach, names that did not ring any bells to me. Then again, set to play their first shows in the Netherlands it would probably also be a first acquaintance to many. I decided to check them out before visiting the festival and doing so l had to adjust all of my (somewhat mainstream) musicality to tune into the styles of music they represented. In that way, and perhaps in many ways, covering Nordic Delight promised to be like discovering an entirely new world. Seeing some YouTube vids of the young but already eccentric Emilie Nicolas for instance, made it clear to me that she could bewilder me even more performing live at our local music venue EKKO, famous for its widely renewing agenda. Nicolas’ enchanting, melancholy and sometimes ecstatic songs made one shiver inside. ‘Amazing work on sound, vocals, electro-pop arrangements and a great richness of colours, true emotion and sensibility’ someone strikingly defined her music. For instance ‘Psterio‘ from her 2014 debut album ‘Like I’m a warrior’ (released in the Netherlands June this year) brought Northern Europe straight into my living room the way only Volvo did before with their ‘Made by Sweden’ campaign.

     

     

    Different dimensions

    Besides prizewinning Nicolas, without any doubt the most famous act in the Nordic Delight line up, the other acts deserve some special attention as well. Fay Wildhagen, the young singer-songwriter and guitarist with her impressive band brings songs with an organic mix of folk, rock and other genres. Straight from the heart and with a wide range of emotions, from small and modest, melancholy at times (as in this beautiful song), too loud and extrovert. Not always easy listening but pure, intense and very vivid. Her promising debut album ‘Snow’ was recently released in the Netherlands. And then there’s the five-piece band Bloody Beach with their self-proclaimed ‘tropidelica’, a colourful and warm cocktail of rock, psychedelia, dub, afrobeat, disco, punk, reggae and pop. Awaiting their final breakthrough with the release of their second album next year, performing at Nordic Delight might warm us up for what’s to come. But it’s not only the main acts that draw attention. The program contains music, a wonderful selection of short films and a Norwegian dinner. So, hungry in many ways, I headed for EKKO on this Saturday night.

    Stunning and ecstatic

    There I was in the midst of a mostly young, alternative audience that at first seemed to be more in place. The atmosphere was relaxed and friendly and obviously everyone was curious for what the night would bring. None of us, however, seemed prepared for the impact of this evening. Where the sit down Norwegian dinner appeared to be reserved for other limited guests and was not open for all of the media, I arrived just before the stage opened at 20.00 hours. With the short films and musical performances programmed at the same time, for me it was more than logical to focus on music this evening and I’m glad I did. Almost traditional at times it was the stunning and sometimes ecstatic performance of the beautiful Emilie Nicolas and her impressive band that brought up a variety of emotions to probably every single visitor this night. What can one say about an overwhelming first acquaintance with this group of very modest young artists that in my opinion deserve a world stage. I’m convinced we’re gonna hear more of them soon…

     

     

    A warm embrace

    Also impressive was the first Dutch performance of the somewhat unordinary but charming Fay Wildhagen and band. Don’t ask me why, but to be honest, I was not expecting them to be as convincing as they were this evening. I was wrong there! Coming in from Hamburg/Germany, where she and Emilie Nicolas performed the night before at Reeperbahn Festival, Wildhagen rocked the house in many ways. Modest and fragile, folky at times and then up-tempo, loud and strong with a great sense of musicality and impressive guitar playing by Wildhagen herself. It felt like a warm embrace with this talented and promising young artist. And then, closing up Nordic Delight, there was Bloody Beach that finally made the audience move with their down to earth mix of music styles. In many ways a somewhat peace loving hippie style, dreamy rock perhaps, rather than the heavy metal appearance they seem to have. They did great on stage and knew how to take the house along with their infectious music.

    Catching up

    Looking back on the overwhelming experience that Nordic Delight was, it seems I’ve been missing out on the fast growing interest in Nordic culture. Working on this article, for instance, I discovered NordicVibes.com, a Dutch version of Nordophile.com which is, to my surprise, based in Utrecht. So without any doubt I’ve got some catching up to do and writing this article might be just the start of that!

    Maurice Hengevel Twitter 

    All photos credited to Wim Pontier

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    Norwegian/British band – Sun Up

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 24th September 2015
  • Nordophile is always on the lookout to bring you fresh Nordic music sounds which are creating ripples on the music scene. Occasionally known for its darker melancholy sounds running alongside with upbeat electronic pop, the acts coming out of the Nordics are certainly welcomed in countries fixated on the Nordic genre right now. We were […]




    Nordophile is always on the lookout to bring you fresh Nordic music sounds which are creating ripples on the music scene. Occasionally known for its darker melancholy sounds running alongside with upbeat electronic pop, the acts coming out of the Nordics are certainly welcomed in countries fixated on the Nordic genre right now.

    We were very excited to learn about a London/Norway mixed band called ‘Sun Up’ and wanted to find out more about this group whose track has been shared on Soundcloud this week.

    Listen to the ethereal dreamy voice from Frøydis Erås backed by upbeat pop music.

     

    Frøydis Erås – Voice
    John de Smet – Keys, Samples & Voice
    Maxim Fernandez – Guitar
    Howard de Smet – Bass
    Andrew Lusher – Drums, Samples & Voice

    If you tipped a scoop of Scandinavian snow, a handful of Hackney muck, and five friends in a blender, you’d get Sun Up, a new electro-speckled pop band hailing from Norway and London. Led by frontwoman Frøydis Erås, this five-piece uniquely weave together the introspective quirk of rural Scandinavia with the Technicolor clatter of metropolitan life.

    Sun Up’s first track ‘Machines’, a bedroom demo recorded and uploaded with minimal fanfare, immediately caught the attention of music tastemaker blogs such as Crack In The Road, Breaking More Waves and Gold Flake Paint.

    At their third ever gig, Sun Up were spotted by veteran booking agent Dave Chumbley at Primary Talent (Lana Del Rey, Alt-J, Wolf Alice) and spent the remainder of the year supporting the likes of Childhood, The Joy Formidable, and Phoria.

    Sun Up’s official debut track ‘Anchors’ is the crystallization of the band’s distinctive Anglo-Scandi DNA. Recorded during the pre-dawn hours of studio downtime by up-and-coming producer Neil Tollitt (Låpsley, Swim Deep, Pussy Riot), ‘Anchors’ is a glittering pop Trojan Horse hiding a bleak, broken heart.

    ‘Bursting with joy but tinged with something that sits between desire and the crushing weight of regret… understated brilliance’ – Gold Flake Paint

    ‘One of our new favourite voices… it took us just twenty-five seconds to fall in love’ – Breaking More Waves

    ‘Fantastic… Sun Up are well worth keeping an eye on’ – Crack In The Road

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    Screen City Festival – Stavanger, Norway

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 10th September 2015
  • Screen City festival 15th-18th October “an expanded cinematic experience about Labour in Norway” will be dedicated to presenting the moving image in public spaces and to exploring the relationship between moving image, sound, and architecture. The festival’s format expands the borders of cinematic experience – reflecting upon the line between the filmatic and the non-filmatic.     […]




    Screen City festival 15th-18th October “an expanded cinematic experience about Labour in Norway” will be dedicated to presenting the moving image in public spaces and to exploring the relationship between moving image, sound, and architecture. The festival’s format expands the borders of cinematic experience – reflecting upon the line between the filmatic and the non-filmatic.

     

     

    Screen City – Moving Image Festival Stavanger presents: Labour & The City In-between. Artists Harun Farocki, Antje Ehmann, Rosa Barba, and an extended list of Czech and Nordic video artists takes over the city, October 15-18th 2015: exploring the temporal, motional and spatial qualities of labour in our current post-industrial climate.

     

    Stavanger, Norway

     

    Curated by Daniela Arriado (CL/NO).

    The point of departure for this year’s program is the post-industrial climate we meet in Europe today. This climate has left us with fluctuating definitions of labour, exploitation of labour, and an unknown economic future. How do these industrial changes affect a city`s architectonic and social rooms? Through the streets of Stavanger, from the Concert Hall to the old industrial port, you will find artworks activating the buildings’ facades. Every building tells a story, and these stories form our city. With the aim of transforming buildings from objects into subjects, we have invited artists – who explore the temporal, motional and spatial qualities of labour in our current post-industrial climate – to present their works in the public spaces of Stavanger.

     

     

    la•bor

    to perform labor; work.
    to strive, as toward a goal; work hard
    productive activity, esp. for the sake of economic gain.
    physical or mental work, esp. of a hard or fatiguing kind.

    The point of departure for this year’s program is the post-industrial climate we meet in Europe today. This climate has left us with fluxuating definitions of labour, exploitation of labour, and an unknown economic future. How do these industrial changes affect a city`s architectonic and social rooms? Through the streets of Stavanger, from the Concert Hall to the old industrial port, you will find artworks activating the buildings’ facades. Every building tells a story, and these stories form our city. With the aim of transforming buildings from objects into subjects, we have invited artists – who explore the temporal, motional and spatial qualities of labour in our current post-industrial climate – to present their works in the public spaces of Stavanger.

     

     

    Old industrial port where  several of the works will be presented

     

    Featured Artists

    Ane Hjort Guttu (NO)

    ARTIST TALK & PREVIEW SCREENING: TIME PASSES
    FRIDAY 16 OCTOBER, 2-4PM
    ROGALAND KUNSTSENTER

    Ane Hjort Guttu presents her recent film related to her investigation into issues of power, freedom and the role of art and artists within political systems. Time Passes (2013) is a 45 min film produced for the 2015 Festival Exhibition in Bergen. Time Passes portrays the art student Damla and her ongoing performative project – begging in the streets of Bergen. Ane Hjort Guttu is an artist, writer and curator based in Oslo. Through video works, picture collections, sculpture and photography her recent work has focused on the issues of power and freedom in the Scandinavian post-welfare state. She also writes analytical as well as poetical texts, and several of her projects discuss art and architectural history.

     

    Photo credit; Ane Hjort

     

    Nils Henrik Asheim (NO)

    ORGELNATT
    FRIDAY 16 OCTOBER, 9-11PM
    STAVANGER CONCERT HALL

    Composer Nils Henrik Asheim (b.1960) combines his career as a performer with regular artist collaborations on projects integrating spatial and theatrical elements. Asheim started out as a pupil of Olav Anton Thommessen and made his début as a composer at the early age of fifteen. Since 1991 Asheim has lived in Stavanger where he is active as a composer, performer and organizer, and not least as the principal initiator of the founding of Tou Scene, an alternative centre for contemporary arts. From September 2012, Asheim has been the organist at Stavanger Concert Hall. Orgelnatt – Organ Night – is a concept where Nils Henrik Asheim invites guest musicians to create a concert event around the organ, exploiting the instrument’s ability to create vast soundscapes. With the help of time and space, we invite the audience to submerge themselves in sound. Orgelnatt has since 2013 been hosted by Stavanger Konserthus. During Screen City Festival, Nils Henrik will perform together with Slovakian artists Pjoni (SK) and Ján Šicko (SK), transforming the concert hall and the organ into an electro-acoustic landscape utilizing mechanical midi management of the organ, and processing sounds from this. The production is part of the Orgel Night program, presenting Norwegian sound artists and musicians like Kjetil Brandsdal and Susanna Wallumrød. The evening will melt into a club program curated by Tou Scene: Electro Motives, presenting live DJ sets by André Bratten (NO) and Jennifer Cardini (FR)

     

    Photo credit; Nils Henrik Asheim

     

    Knut Åsdam (NO)

    MOBIL EGRESS
    DAILY, 6PM-MIDNIGHT
    LORRY, RYFYLKEGATA/MATHALLEN

    Mobil Egress is a touring lorry; an architectural art/film/cinema installation with the film Egress built inside the back compartment. It functions as a mobile cinema and is built up from installation elements to create an architectonic environment. The piece merges art and film distributed in an unusual way. It looks at contemporary Norway and its psychology through themes of work, class, oil and the material world. Egress is a narrative set in a gas station in the edge-lands of Oslo. The main characters work at the bottom of the oil company hierarchy and are engulfed in the everyday and the dark economic and psychological shadows of their society. Egress is the story of a young woman who deals with her everyday work situation with independence and stubbornness in her work and life in the periphery of the city. The film shows relationships between control and independence, about labour, class and work, but it is also a poetic film about a socially insecure edge-land of the city—and about a psychological flip side or cost of the everyday, somewhere near the bottom of the huge economic ladder of the oil industry which secures Norway’s stability. Knut Åsdam lives and works in Oslo, Norway.

     

    Photo credit; Knut Asdam

     

    Beathe C Rønning (NO)

    MEDITATIONS ON WORK III
    DAILY, 6PM-MIDNIGHT
    ROGALAND KUNSTSENTER

    For the past eight Beathe C Rønning has been filming manual and mechanical work processes. What interests her in these Meditations is the choreography that comes straight from the body, and from the routine operation of machines. Or that doesn’t. In practical terms, Meditations on Work is a three-channel video piece with a specially composed soundtrack, a soundless video composition showing sequences of people at work overlaid with scrolling text (II), and a booklet with stills and text. Each sequence is prosaic and commonplace, rooted in the here and now. The steady pulse of work that goes on around us all the time. For Rønning, it is here we find the greatest poetic potential, because here the beauty is subtle yet accessible. “Work is of two kinds: first, altering the position of matter at or near the earth’s surface relatively to other such matter; second, telling other people to do so.” (Bertrand Russell) An artist’s work falls between the manual and the abstract. Rønning neither give nor follow orders. She observes, films and reflects, refining impressions through the rhythm of composition, the pulse of the soundtrack, the focus of the text. “Copenhagen, Kvinesdal, Torp, Oslo, Berlin, Lier, Drammen, Sande: I must thank everyone who has allowed me to film them, and for all the goodwill I have met with.” (Beathe C. Rønning) During the Screen City Festival, Beathe will present Meditations on Work – edition 3, with a newly composed text. The work is presented on the Rogaland Kunstsenter facade window. (Credits: Peter Cribbs.no)

     

    Photo credit; Beate C Ronning

    For more information about other events taking place at #Screencity and the full range of artists appearing or taking part please head to 2015.screencity.no

    We would also like to thank Screen city for their text and photos.

    Featured image credited to Mirjam Struppek 

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    Nordic Delight – Norwegian Night

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 26th August 2015
  • EKKO_pand_voorkant_SophiaTwigt (2)

    Nordophile has always noted the Nordic connection between the Nordics and the Netherlands. Close ties are going to be made even stronger when Nordic Delight put on a Norwegian Night in the cultural hub city, Utrecht.     Nordic Delight Norwegian Night with Emilie Nicolas, Bloody Beach & Fay Wildhagen The organisation of Nordic Delight […]




    Nordophile has always noted the Nordic connection between the Nordics and the Netherlands. Close ties are going to be made even stronger when Nordic Delight put on a Norwegian Night in the cultural hub city, Utrecht.

     

    1

     

    Nordic Delight Norwegian Night with Emilie Nicolas, Bloody Beach & Fay Wildhagen

    The organisation of Nordic Delight has announced the next Scandinavian event today. On Saturday, September, 26th music venue EKKO in Utrecht is all about Norway. With live performances by Emilie Nicolas, Bloody Beach and Fay Wildhagen Nordic Delight brings three talented high potential acts from Norway to Utrecht. Besides live music, short films by Norwegian makers are screened and there is a limited number of combi tickets available including a three-course Norwegian dinner.

     

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    Fay Wildhagen is a young folk singer-songwriter and guitarist from Oslo and one of the biggest promises of Norway. With a full band including violin and cello she brings an organic blend of folk, rock and other genres with lots of passion and charm and a very unique sound. After a summer full of performances at all important Norwegian festivals, she will play at several international (showcase) festivals later this year, but first she will make her debut in the Netherlands at our Norwegian Night.

    FayWildhagen.com

     

    Bloody-Beach-Photo-by-Tore-Winsents

    Photo credit Tore Winsents

     

    Who remembers Kakkmaddafakka? Bloody Beach are also from Bergen and guarantee a similar party! A cheerful mix of pop, rock, psychedelia, with elements of afrobeat, dub and surf rock, which they describe as ‘tropidelica’. Next year, with the release of their second album, a breakthrough is expected, including shows at Dutch festivals, but at Nordic Delight you can get a first taste.

    BloodyBeachMusic.com

     

     

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    Emilie Nicolas is the most well-known name in her own country and was already on the wishlist of Nordic Delight for a while. The Norwegian singer and composer is praised for her powerful vocals and wistful lyrics, accompanied by a sparse and somber backdrop of electronic beats. Emilie Nicolas won several awards as best live act and for her debut album, which was released in the Netherlands in June this year. In September, she will tour through Europe and gives an exclusive show at Nordic Delight.

    Nordic Delight organised two festivals and several events in Utrecht in the last three years, always focussed on Scandinavian music and culture. On September 26 Nordic Delight offers you the chance again to experience the most talented upcoming music acts from Norway for the first time in the Netherlands.

    EmilieNicolas.com

     

    Head over to Nordic Delight for more information and support this Nordic event at EKKO Utrecht.

     

    images

    Tickets are now for sale here: http://bit.ly/1EglOP5

    More info: www.nordicdelight.nl

    Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1633009736915265

     

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    LIAF – Norway

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 14th August 2015
  • 9bNBnIpd

    Lofoten International Art Festival takes place in the municipality of Vågan in the Lofoten archipelago – August 28 – September 27. LIAF is a festival for contemporary art taking place in Lofoten a cluster of islands located on the North West Coast of Norway, just above the Arctic Circle, every second year. The festival was first […]




    Lofoten International Art Festival takes place in the municipality of Vågan in the Lofoten archipelago – August 28 – September 27.

    LIAF is a festival for contemporary art taking place in Lofoten a cluster of islands located on the North West Coast of Norway, just above the Arctic Circle, every second year. The festival was first initiated in 1991, as a local art exhibition with a broad range of expressions and with a regional profile. From 1999, the festival was given an international profile changing the name to Lofoten International Art Festival, and since 2009, the festival has been run by The North Norwegian Art Center (NNKS) and LIAF’s artistic advisory board.

     

    1416226369938LIAF_eflux_image_tn_web

     

    LIAF presents works by international artists in a local and site-specific context and seeks to be an open, experimental and including meeting place for artists, audience and locals. LIAF acknowledges the complexity of place and seeks to be a discursive, engaged and social platform for different positions creating a dialogue between the local and global. The prospect of developing and discovering new knowledge and understanding through art is the core of the festival. LIAF is not connected to a permanent location or space, but is invented anew every time by infiltrating and moving into already existing structures: Everything from a garage, a library, a shed, a bunker, a fish drying rack, a private house, a shop or an old warehouse. New curators also develop the festival every time, with diverse backgrounds, ideas and practices and in different ways bringing the familiar and unfamiliar together. By insisting on this open and experimental approach, we believe LIAF can be a place for exchange and involvement on multitude levels, every time revealing new things about our world and ourselves.

     

    26

     

    LIAF has taken place eight times since 1999 presenting artists like Gillian Wearing, Lawrence Weiner, AK Dolven, Ken Lum, Olafur Eliasson, Mari Slaattelid, Elmgren & Dragseth, Gardar Eide Einarsson, Pipilotti Rist, Geir Tore Holm, Eija Liisa Athila, Jesper Just, Amar Kanwar, Tori Wrånes, Michel Auder, Kjersti Andvig, John Giorno, Lene Berg, Lindsay Seers, David Horvitz, Mahmoud Khaled, HC Gilje, Karl Larsson, Shilpa Gupta, István Csácány, Lisa Tan and many more.

     

    Markus_Selg

    Markus Selg

     

    LIAF curators have been Tor Inge Kveum, Per Gunnar Tverbakk, Vibeke Sjøvoll, Gry Ulrichsen, Göran Christenson, Maaretta Jaukkuri, Taru Elfving, Richard Borgström, Helga-Marie Nordby, Thora Dolven Balke, Linn Pedersen, Anne Szefer Karlsen, Bassam El Baroni and Eva González-Sancho.

     

    Kjell Ove Storvik-LIAF 2013-9054

    Kjell Ove Storvik

     

    Disappearing Acts 2015

    Titled Disappearing Acts, LIAF 2015 will take its thematic basis on ideas of human agency disappearing through the processes of history, ecology, and technology. This approach is informed by the context of the Lofoten Islands, with its precarious economic-environmental dependency, its highly marketable “screensaver” scenery, and its cultural legacy of self-sufficiency and retreat from the antagonism of the urbanised world. Organised as a large-scale group exhibition, Disappearing Acts will feature 25–30 international artists, with many works commissioned especially for LIAF 2015. The exhibition will also be accompanied by a full public programme and publication.

     

    1438171173118opening_image

     

    Venue

    The “Jern & Bygg” premises in Svolvær serves as the main venue for LIAF 2015. Jern & Bygg was a family-owned hardware store and furniture outlet that operated continuously from 1948 to 2010. The business developed through the decades and new sections were repeatedly added to the original building. When it closed in 2010, it had expanded to a scale of 3,500 square meters across several floors. The history of the premises runs parallel to the post-war history of Norway and Lofoten, from the expansive rebuilding after WWII, the rise of Social Democracy, the re-creation of Norway as a petrostate in the ’70s, the discontinuation of industrial production, monopolization of the fishing industry and subsequently the gentrification and touristification of the new millennium. The building is now the last example of pragmatic waterfront architecture in Svolvær. After LIAF 2015, the building will be demolished.

    The North Norwegian Art Center (NNKS) is a juncture institution for Northern Norway responsible for presenting contemporary art and arts and crafts. NNKS is an artist-run institution owned by The North-Norwegian Visual Artist Association (NNBK) and The North Norwegian Craft Association (NKNN).

     

    _DSC7676.pdf

     

    Curators for 2015

    Matt Packer is a curator and writer currently based in Northern Ireland. He is Director of CCA (Centre for Contemporary Art) in Derry~Londonderry, and an Associate Director of Treignac Projet in France. Packer says he is delighted to have the opportunity to co-curate LIAF 2015: What makes LIAF so unique is not only the spectacular scenery and sociability of the Lofoten Islands but also its remarkable history of developing artistic dialogues that extend outwardly from Lofoten and into other arenas. As a festival, it has a restless ambition to think through new models of curatorial approach at a time when the formula for larger-scale biennale-type contemporary art events seems ever more standardized. As such, I’d like to think that curating LIAF 2015 will not only be a conversation about art and artists but a conversational experiment in public practice.

     

     

    Arne Skaug Olsen is a curator, art critic and writer based in Bergen in Norway. He is a regular contributor to Nordic online web journal for art criticism, kunstkritikk.no, and has published writings in Camera Austria, Klasskampen, Billedkunst and Kunstjournalen B-Post, among others. Skaug Olsen is also excited: It is an honor to be trusted with the task of co-curating the next LIAF, one of the most important recurring art events in Norway. I have followed the biennale closely, and on two occasions been part of the LIAF crew, in different capacities. It´s a privilege to now be a part of the festivals history, and to shape it´s future. Lofoten is truly a unique place, especially because of all the open minded and welcoming people in the region, but also because their outspokenness and their interest in art and culture. Conversations in Lofoten are never dull, and I´m looking forward to participate in the ongoing dialogue with the people of Lofoten about what role art and artist should play in their community, and beyond.

     

    11 (1)

     

    Featured Artists

     

    Anna Ådahl (b.1973 in Stockholm, Sweden, lives and works in Stockholm and London, UK) studied at Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux Arts de Paris, France. Her works spans performance, film and installation. Ådahl’s work has been presented at Taiga Space, St. Petersburg, Russia (2014); Botkyrka Konsthall, Stockholm (2013); WELD, Stockholm (2013); FRAC Champagne-Ardenne, Reims, France (2013); Palais de Tokyo, Paris, France (2012); Centrum för Fotografi, Stockholm (2009); and Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennal, Niigata-Ken, Japan (2006).

     

    LIAF ANNA ÅDAHL2

     

    Roderick Hietbrink (b.1975 in Gorssel, the Netherlands, lives and works in Oslo, Norway and Amsterdam, the Netherlands) holds a MFA from Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam. Hietbrink’s work span video installation, film, performance, objects and photography, investigating aspects of the psychology and inherent conflicts between the rational and instinctive self. His work has been exhibited at Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Centre Pompidou, Paris, France; De Appel, Amsterdam; Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam; Artspace Visual Art Centre, Sydney, Australia; and the 5th Moscow Biennale, Russia.

     

    Roderick Hietbrink_Fear, Anger, Sadness, Joy

     

    Sam Basu (b.1967 in London, UK, lives and works in Treignac, France) is the Director of Treignac Projet, an exhibition and workshop project established in 2007 together with Liz Murray. Sam Basu works predominantly with sculptural installation and architectural-research projects, with a particular interest in the relationship between esoteric and activist approaches to counter-culturalism. He often works in collaboration with other artists, including Shahin Afrassiabi, Francis Upritchard, and Matt Bryans. Basu’s work has been presented at Glucksman Gallery, Cork, Ireland; Camden Arts Centre, London; and Laing Gallery, Newcastle, UK.

     

    The Actual Possibility of Escape

     

    Jon Benjamin Tallerås (b. 1984 in Oslo, Norway, lives and works in Oslo) graduated from the Oslo National Academy of the Arts in 2011. His work spans different media, including photography, video, sculpture, performance, text and installation. Tallerås investigates urban space, exploring hidden and often non-used areas of the city. His sculptures are often made out of found materials. Tallerås is one of the co-founders and curators of the project space One Night Only. He has exhibited his work at Akershus Kunstsenter, Lillestrøm, Norway (2014); Kunsthall Oslo (2014); Oslo Kunstforening, Oslo (2013); Gallery BOA, Oslo (2013); and NoPlace, Oslo (2011).

     

    Experiments, Propositions, Decay and Deterieration (2015)_3

     

    Steinar Haga Kristensen (b.1980 in Oslo, Norway, lives and works in Oslo) studied at the Oslo National Academy of the Arts, Akademie der Bildenden Künste, Vienna and at Sydney College of Art. Haga Kristensen’s work seeks to unveil the positive lingual potentiality inherent in the exuberant modernity. He often stages theatricalised spectatorship and mannerist sculptural repetition. He is one of the founding members of the artist group D.O.R. Haga Kristensen has presented his work at WIELS Contemporary Art Centre, Brussels; Etablissement d’en face projects, Brussels; Kunsthall Oslo; Gallery Rod Bianco, Oslo; The Danish Pavilion at the 54th International Art Biennial in Venice; Witte de With, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Dortmund Bodega, Oslo; Gallery Niklas Belenius, Stockholm, Sweden; Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde, Denmark and Young Artists’ Society (UKS), Oslo; and Bergen Kunsthall, Bergen, Norway.

     

    The Loneliness of the Index Finger (Part II)

     

    www.liaf.no

    www.nnks.no

    Photos supplied by LIAF.

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    SALT – A culture explosion in Norway

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
  • 12th August 2015
  • Naustet-1024x647

    Nordophile is proud to present SALT, an extensive and varied programme of art and culture throughout August, with an all Norwegian list of artists.     The artists Edvine Larssen, HC Gilje and Caroline Bergvall will each present a commissioned art installation on the beach. You can experience  Jenny Hval, Mari Boine and Bjørn Eidsvåg play concerts in breathtaking […]




    Nordophile is proud to present SALT, an extensive and varied programme of art and culture throughout August, with an all Norwegian list of artists.

     

    IMG_8487-Marte_Antonsen-1024x576

     

    The artists Edvine Larssen, HC Gilje and Caroline Bergvall will each present a commissioned art installation on the beach. You can experience  Jenny Hval, Mari Boine and Bjørn Eidsvåg play concerts in breathtaking surroundings, and let yourself be seduced by the DJ concept Solitude Sessions. SALT introduces a series of concerts with young Norwegian talents. They will give intimate solo concerts in the atmospheric Cafe Naustet and Agora; Marthe como el planeta, Ingeborg Oktober, Nagel and Sophie Kvam, Fredrik William Olsen, Morten Myklebust and Psyence Fiction.

    Every Saturday there will be sauna in one of the world’s largest saunas with panoramic view!

     

    Agora

    Marte Antonsen

    For thousands of years people have followed the movement of animals and the seasonal rhythms in the Arctic landscape. Footprints are few. SALT is inspired by and moves in that same Arctic landscape with care and respect“.

    SALT begins its journey on an Arctic beach on the mountainous island Sandhornøy. Sandhornøy is in Gildeskål municipality in Northern Norway, just south of Bodø. SALT opened in August 2014 and will stay at Sandhornøy until 2016. Over the coming years, SALT will travel across the northernmost part of our planet, making a home in Greenland, Iceland, the Faroe Islands, Ireland, Scotland, Spitsbergen, Alaska and Russia.

    SALT consists of several structures taking their form from the fiskehjelle (fish rack), a strong symbol of the livelihoods of the people of the north. Within these simple and portable structures, the audience is invited in to experience extraordinary art projects, concerts, theatre, readings and local food cultures.

    The world is watching the Arctic. It is estimated to hold more than twenty percent of the world’s currently unexploited oil reserves; it is the home of many of the world’s most vulnerable environments. Climate change is increasingly visible, the rate of change exceeding that of any other part of the world. What will happen as ever larger areas become ice-free, with nations and global corporations pushing for the extraction of oil and minerals?

     

    Salt-åpning-0142

    Martn Losvik

    Mankind has inhabited the Arctic landscape for ten thousand years. Arctic nomads wandered with the ice, taking advantage of available resources from coastal areas and a mountainous countryside. Their concern for and close relationship to nature means that archaeologists are able to find few remnants of their culture. This is the essence of the Arctic indigenous people’s philosophy and the guideline for SALT’s eight year long journey, which will be a cultural platform focusing on our common future, lifestyle and on environment and climate changes.

    Northern Norway has been the uninterrupted abode of more people than anywhere else in the Arctic region. This has been possible due to the abundance of fish at the outskirts of the Gulf Stream, as well as the inventiveness and stubbornness of its inhabitants. To endure long winters, all kinds of food preservation methods had to be invented. Two of the most successful were the salting and drying of fish on rocks (clipfish) and the drying of fish on fiskehjell constructions – the fish rack (stockfish). For thousands of years, such fish racks have been seen along the northern coast, on exposed headlands and small islands, where winds are strong and fish dries fast. Today, in many places, these are in the process of being torn down and forgotten.

     

    Gunnar_Holmstad_Presse_2015-GUN_1692-1024x683

    Martn Losvik

    The fish rack has a form that reflects the coastal mountains. It has solid, strong poles that allow gusts of wind to slip through; it is a steep, slender and tall structure with an inherent Arctic flexibility; its lightness effectively enables it to be erected and taken down in a day in case people need to move along the coast. Since the poles float, they can also be dragged behind a boat when people look for new land, new seas and a new life. SALT has an equally flexible and fundamental function, albeit using art as the primary means of support.

     

    Featured artists

     

    Edvine Larssen

    For her new work at SALT Looking Close. Looking Far.Larssen will be in close dialogue with the people, history and places at Sandhornøy and the surrounding islands in Nordland over a period of one year. The first part of the work titled Pust is presented in the Pyramid, and offer a new way to navigate and experience the existing site at SALT. The installation was premiered Saturday 8 August, and involved a conversation on the artist’s next project Looking Close. Looking Far. with curator Helga-Marie Nordby og Edvine Larssen. Local people who would like to contact the artist are very welcome to email the artist: hedvine[a]gmail.com

    Entitled PUST (‘BREATH’ when translated to English), the work features a bright neon coloured textile installation, similar to the form of a curtain or large boat sail, which will cover one end of the largest of the wooden pyramid structures that is housed on the beach at SALT, acting as a highlight or marker in the landscape. The theatrical curtain, made from a transparent and lightweight fabric, will be visible from the sea and will live within the area’s striking scenery, evolving with the changeable weather conditions and moving with the wind and rain.

    At intervals during the project, the curtain will become a backdrop for the ongoing project Looking Close. Looking Far. and be raised up to mark the next stage of the project’s evolution.

    Since 2013 Larssen has been a Research fellow in the Norwegian Programme for artistic research at the Art Academy in Trondheim, NTNU with the project: Theatrical, but not theatre. Architectonic, but not architecture. Sculptural, but not sculpture. In this research project Larssen is using the Japanese concept [Ma], dealing with different layers of time and space, as a tool or method for creating art works in-between different fields. Her work for SALT is part of this research.

    Gunnar Holmstad
     
    HC GILJE is a Norwegian artist working with light, sound, architecture and space. SALT has commissioned Gilje to create a light motion installation for the fish rack structure, the Pyramid.

    Since 2006 Gilje has worked on a long-term project he has called Conversations with Spaces. It incorporates elements from his earlier practice: exploration of physical spaces in his videos, creation of spaces in his stage work and improvisation from his live work.

    This project explores, mainly through large-scale installations, perception of change and transformation in the meeting between the ephemeral media of light, projection, sound and motion with physical structures.

    Gilje aims to activate spaces and structures that are experienced through our bodies, seeing the body as the link between our mind and the physical world. He links perception of time and space to motion as it passes through spaces, objects, bodies and landscapes.

     
    Caroline Bergvall

    Caroline Bergvall is a French-Norwegian writer and artist working across media, languages and art-forms, based in London since 1989. Her projects alternate between installations, live performances, sound and audioworks, books and printed texts, as well as net-based pieces.

    On 23 August 2015, at 9am in the morning, Bergvall will present Watchman (68°12’N), a special time and site-specific performance at SALT, which invites the audience to call in the day as a communal experience.

    Watchman (68°12’N) is part of Bergvall’s ongoing work Raga Dawn, a sunrise vocal performance performed outdoors from the last hours of night until the very early morning during the Summer months, to accompany and celebrate the rising of day.

    From May – September 2016, Bergvall will perform Raga Dawn as a travelling trajectory at some 10 European sites of varying latitudes. The piece changes according to the length of the sunrise, from twilight to the first rays of the sun. The composition is an open and changing cycle of time-specific vocal and instrumental pieces, written for two voices (spoken and sung).

     

    Caroline-Bergvall-foto-Tom-Martin-640x360 (1)

    Photo Tom Martin

    Watchman (68°12’N) will be performed on the beach at SALT, from the very early hours of the morning until the sun reaches over the mountain and down to the beach. Celebrating the rise of day, the piece releases serenity and a spirit of hope, collective openness and amorous connectedness. It explores sounds and structures from mantra morning traditions to create vibratory connections between the two live voices and the very sparse frequency-based sound design. Passing birds’ songs, solar winds and meteoric showers are invited into the open composition.

    The title Watchman (68°12’N) is loosely inspired by the early medieval European morning poetry, the “alba”, in which secret passionate lovers are warned by the watchman, their accomplice, that dawn is calling in and that they soon need to separate.

    Here, the collective spirit of the performance also calls up the large rhythmic seasonal and diurnal patterns that re-connect beings to their bodies, to their surroundings.

    Artistic team:

    Lead artist: Caroline Bergvall
    Singing voice: Anouk Molendijk
    Sound design: David Scrufari
    Dramaturgy: Michèle Pralong

    carolinebergvall.com

    Bergvall-1280x720 (1)

    Gunnar Holmstad

     

    Music programme

    SALT presents a series of concerts with young Norwegian talents. They will give intimate solo concerts in the atmospheric Cafe Naustet and Agora; Marthe como el planeta, Ingeborg Oktober, Nagel and Sophie Kvam, Fredrik William Olsen, Silje Hansen, Psyence fiction and Lamark.

     

    Fredrik-William-Olsen-Foto_MartinLosvik-1280x720

    Martin Losvik

    Outdoor stage – Gildehallen

    Experience Mari Boine and a family concert with Bjørn Eidsvåg. In Agora amphi, with a panoramic view to the beach, sea and sky, Jenny Hval will perform. SALT also introduces the concept “Solitude Sessions”.

     

    Salt-åpning-2-13-1280x720
    Martin Losvik

    Every Saturday 10pm – 1am the outdoor stage Gildehallen, will hold different DJ’s all giving different interpretations of SALT and the beach which it is situated.

    The DJs are Snasen, DJ Strangefruit, Ådne Meisfjord (120Days/ Serena Maneesh) and DJ Karima.

    Head to Salted.no to find out more

    All photos provided by salted.no

    Featured image; Martin Losvik

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    Farao – Norwegian songstress

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 29th July 2015
  • farao_till_its_all_forgotten_lp_pakshot_lo

    Nordophile has been seduced by the ethereal voice of Kari Jahnsen, a London-based Norwegian singer. Farao, is the musical alter ego of adventurous pop songbird & multi-instrumentalist Kari Jahnsen, who will release her debut album Till It’s All Forgotten on 11th September 2015 via Full-Time Hobby.     Today she reveals a new single ‘Bodies’, a song about […]




    Nordophile has been seduced by the ethereal voice of Kari Jahnsen, a London-based Norwegian singer.

    Farao, is the musical alter ego of adventurous pop songbird & multi-instrumentalist Kari Jahnsen, who will release her debut album Till It’s All Forgotten on 11th September 2015 via Full-Time Hobby.

     

     

    Today she reveals a new single ‘Bodies’, a song about giving into bad decisions and described by The Fader as “A tense, trombone-laced march led by Jahnsen’s gentle urging.”

    Farao composed and performed all instruments (except brass and drums) on Till It’s All Forgotten’s ten songs. Shimmering with depths of determination and sorrow, the album combines celestial pop, R&B and haunting brass melodies.

     

    farao_till_its_all_forgotten_lp_pakshot_lo

    Farao’s varied and evocative musical artillery – guitars, synths, organs, glockenspiel, sitar – dances at her fingertips, dazzlingly interwoven with her ethereal vocals to create a suite of music that is otherworldly and entirely her own. First single ‘Hunter’ shimmers with starry electronics churning against an inexorable underbelly of rhythm. The brooding ‘Bodies’, thunders over rugged terrain, its knotted path smoothed by Farao’s angelic, but stoic, voice.

     

    farao_press_3_credit-Karl_Erik_Brøndbo_lo

    Produced by Mike Lindsay (of Tunng) and mixed by Grammy Award winner Andrew Scheps (Hozier, Lana Del Rey, Cass McCombs), Farao’s sublime debut is a unique composite of sonic elements perfectly reflecting and enlarging upon its emotional themes and dramatic range.

    Farao is set to play the Sebright Arms on 10th September.

    Farao.co.uk

     

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    Norwegian artist Rina Charlott Lindgren

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 24th July 2015
  • Rina Charlott Lindgren 15

    Norwegian artist Rina Charlott Lindgren first came to our attention as one of the artist in Residency at the Nordic Artists’ Centre Dalsåsen. She was born in Tromsø, Norway but now resides in the culture hub in the centre of Europe, Brussels.    “Alignement IV”, wood and graphite 2015 and “Glacier”, pencil on paper, 2015 […]




    Norwegian artist Rina Charlott Lindgren first came to our attention as one of the artist in Residency at the Nordic Artists’ Centre Dalsåsen.

    She was born in Tromsø, Norway but now resides in the culture hub in the centre of Europe, Brussels.

     

    Rina Charlott Lindgren 3

     Alignement IV”, wood and graphite 2015 and “Glacier”, pencil on paper, 2015

     

    Art historian, art critic and curator Joakim Borda compiled a summary about Rina, talking about her as an artist, her works and style. Describing her interpretations on Norwegian Goth also known as Nordic Gloom, Joakim reflects on this young artist who is increasingly becoming respected within this art genre.

     

    Rina Charlott Lindgren 5

    “Collection”, graphite and pencil on paper, 2015 and “Collection II”, graphite on paper, 2015

     

    Mysteries of Ocean – Reflections on the work of Rina C. Lindgren

    It is twilight in an almost barren Birchwood forest, with ghoulish green reflections tainting the scarce foliage clustering on the top of naked stems. In this sort of dark gloomy forest well known from Scandinavian folklore with its many tales of trolls and sprites, a portal into another dimension opens itself in thin air, white light streaking out it. Like few other artists of her generation, Rina C. Lindgren knows how to create enigmatic images that are as uncanny as technically exquisite.

     

    Rina Charlott Lindgren 6

    Overview

     

    I have had the privilege of working with Lindgren on several curatorial projects since she graduated from Trondheim Art Academy in 2011. In that short time she has become one of the most promising exponents of what has been described as Norwegian Gothic, or Nordic Gloom – a contemporary interpretation of Gothic aesthetics within contemporary art with a particular Scandinavian sensibility. In her book “Heart of Darkness: a Poetics of Darkness”, Anne Williams describes the essence of Gothic conventions as the systematic representation of ‘otherness’. The basic formula of Gothic representation can often be reduced in opposites such as good/evil, nature/culture or male/female. It is in the tension between such opposites that the Gothic appears in fiction and art.

     

    Rina Charlott Lindgren 12

    “Sample”, pencil on paper and collage, 2015

     

    Choosing often to work in pencil on paper, Rina Lindgren deal with a string of themes, which can be divided in motifs that closely connect to the symbolic imagery of Romanticism, such as ruins, caves, dead trees and stormy seascapes, “the dangerous mysteries of ocean” Mary Shelley described in her classic Gothic novel Frankenstein (1818). These works can be seen as commentaries on the Romantic idea of the terrible Sublime, awe-striking and frightening at the same time. In a seminal work entitled What is left Behind III (2011) a buried young man is consumed by the roots of a tree, bringing to mind the corpse brides and vampiric phenomena of Gothic horror.

     

    Rina Charlott Lindgren 13

    “Fall is a feeling”, pencil on paper , 2014

     

    Parallel to this, Lindgren also explores a more intensely psychological landscape rooted in her own personal history. Born above the Polar Circle in the Northern Norwegian city of Tromsø, Lindgren is no stranger to “the land of mist and snow”, as Coleridge describes it in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798). In fact, a recurrent theme in Lindgren’s work revolves around the ancient coastal culture of her home region, and her own family history with a seaman father leave biographical traces in both her drawings and sculptural work. Recurrent motifs connected with the Northern coasts, such as lighthouses, fishing boats and fjords are paired with three-dimensional and collages works that incorporate found objects from an inherited family house in Lofoten, as well as memorabilia of her father’s life at sea. These works resemble reliquaries of private devotion, nostalgic perhaps of a culture nearly extinguished by modernity.

     

    Rina Charlott Lindgren 15

    “Solgløtt III” graphite on paper, 2014

     

    Recent works however, seem to move away from the previous fascination with Romanticism and nostalgia. Although architectural details have always featured prominently in her works as traces of culture, lately Lindgren expresses a particular interest in the formal aspects of architecture. Walls, windows and ceilings organise space, ultimately defining the limits between inside and outside. Again we can trace the basic dichotomy between nature and culture, but now the artist turns a more scrutinising eye towards the latter. Paradoxically a long stay in the remote surroundings of Lofoten seem to have had a restricting effect on the artist’s need for visual representations of northern Norway, replacing them for a more abstract and culturally disassociated imagery, although natural phenomena like the sea, forests and skies still play an important role.

     

    Rina Charlott Lindgren(1)

    “Days are floating through my eyes II”, graphite on paper, 2015

     

    Although a young artist in the early beginning of her trajectory, Rina C. Lindgren’s great promise lies in the consistency of her work, in both it’s trueness to a subject matter that is poetic and uncompromising in its draughtsmanship.

    The next solo show from Rina, titled “Wind blown blue”, will be in Bodø kunstforening with opening 1stAugust.

    Photos credited to Thomas Falstad

    www.rinalindgren.net

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    The Scream from Nature

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 15th July 2015
  • The Scream from Nature is an eco-art project which aims to raise consciousness about the relationship between humans and nature. The project is a contemporary interpretation of Munch’s masterpiece the Scream, in which the iconic anxiety-ridden face is recreated in nature with a variety of materials.     Munch wrote several texts about the Scream […]




    The Scream from Nature is an eco-art project which aims to raise consciousness about the relationship between humans and nature. The project is a contemporary interpretation of Munch’s masterpiece the Scream, in which the iconic anxiety-ridden face is recreated in nature with a variety of materials.

     

    IMG_1577

     

    Munch wrote several texts about the Scream motif, the most poignant among these being: “I felt a huge unending scream course through nature”. Now, over 100 years later, we hear another ”scream” from nature: droughts, forest fires, floods, earth slides, extreme weather, melting glaciers and mass extinction of animal and plant species are just some of the challenges the world faces today.

     

    Hove Music Festival

    Initiated by Norwegian artist Lise Wulff, the Scream from Nature is developed in collaboration with the environmental NGO Bellona, Pure CSR and Serbian artist Branislav Nikolic. The project was part of the official celebration of Edvard Munch’s 150th anniversary in 2013, and collaborates with the United Nations Environment Programme.

    Thousands of people from all over the world have made screams to help nature be heard; HRH Crown Prince Haakon of Norway, Nobel Peace Prize winner and head of IPCC at the time Dr. Pachauri, artist Cee Lo Green, the Norwegian Ministers of Environment, of Culture and of Development, the pro teams at La Vuelta a España 2013, UNEP delegates to the Governing Council in Nairobi in 2013, and many more.

     

    Beach clean up Skrik av rakgods i fjæra Bakkamyra skole

     

    About the artist behind the project: 

    Lise Wulff connects the realms of art and culture with those of the environment and nature. Her practice employs a variety of media, ranging from painting, sculpture and land art to large scale projects.

    Wulff seeks to make visible the interconnectedness between humans and nature. Some of her works make explicit the fragility of nature, while others show the force of nature, as her art is left to the dominance of natural processes and the perpetual changes of seasons and time.

    Lise Wulff has exhibited in galleries and museums in Norway and abroad. Recent group exhibitions include Lost Garden at the Henie Onstad Art Centre, Norway; Ahoj at the Museum Kampa, Praha; Elements at ArtEco Gallery, London; and Izložba at Treci Gallery, Belgrade. Her last solo show Benetah and Below (the Outside is Shallow) was at the Bærum Kunstforening, Norway.

     

    Lise_Wulff_Photo Stephanie Drescher Basiliscus production

    Photo Stephanie Drescher Basiliscus production

     

    Make your own Scream from Nature and share it with the world

    Scream grid

    Use your creativity. Choose a material – for example, collect waste, like plastic, metal or electronic waste that later can be recycled. Put it in the shape of the scream. If you need a drawing to look at, here is one

     

     

     

    Take a picture of your scream

     

     

     

    Share it with the world* :

    instagram

    Instagram: Tag your photo with #thescreamfromnature, and location   tag if you want

    facebookFacebook: Share and feel free to add you personal comments and where in the world your scream was done

    If these options do not suit you, you are welcome to send your Scream to scream@thescreamfromnature.com, and we will publish it for you.

     

    London Thames residues

     

    thescreamfromnature.com

     

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    NORLA, Norwegian Literature Abroad

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 25th June 2015
  • translated-days

    Nordophile wanted to look closer at how Nordic literature is translated. We came across NORLA, a Norwegian institute, who do just that. With demand for Nordic books – as the Nordic Noir and diverse genre Nordic literary obsession sweeps around the world – it is up to a few very helpful people to make this possible for countries […]




    Nordophile wanted to look closer at how Nordic literature is translated. We came across NORLA, a Norwegian institute, who do just that.

    With demand for Nordic books – as the Nordic Noir and diverse genre Nordic literary obsession sweeps around the world – it is up to a few very helpful people to make this possible for countries whose first language isn’t one of the Scandinavians, but still would like to immerse themselves in Nordic literature.

    Norway is very proactive when it comes to translating and promoting its authors and their works around the world.

     

    NORLA

     

    NORLA, the Centre for Norwegian literature abroad, promotes Norwegian literature export through active promotion of work and support for translation. The organization spreads knowledge of Norwegian books and authors abroad, and operation is funded by the Ministry of Culture. NORLAwas created in 1978 and has so far supported translations of Norwegian books to 63 languages. NORLA offers a variety of support schemes all aim to promote translations Norwegian books.

     

    norla

     

    Norwegian books in translation published so far this year

    As of 15 June 2015, NORLA has received 204 Norwegian books that have been published in a total of 41 languages through NORLA’s
    (and in the Nordic region: The Nordic Council of Ministers’) translation subsidies.
    There are 165 fiction publications and 39 non-fiction publications. And of these a total of 41 are titles for children and young people.

    Translator of the month

    Our new series of translator interviews (in Norwegian) has been well received. We are now happy to introduce the translator for June:
    Gabriele Haefs from Germany. She has translated an impressive number of Norwegian authors and in 2011 received the Royal Norwegian Order of Merit for her oeuvre.

     

    translated-days

     

    Causerie competition for translators of Norwegian literature

    NORLA is repeating the success from the translation festival (Oversatte Dager) of 2013 and once again invites
    translators of Norwegian literature to take part in our causerie competition.
    Please note that the competition is open only for those who translate directly from Norwegian.

    Photo from Norla.no

    Oversattedager.no

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