Nordophile attends Norwegian Night in Utrecht

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  • 29th September 2015
  • A Nordic fairytale in…Utrecht? As a Dutch copywriter – editor – journalist I don’t usually write in English, but when Nordophile’s Sarah Surgey – whom I ‘met’ on Instagram – asked me to cover the Nordic Delight Festival in my hometown Utrecht I thought: why not give it a try! The undiscovered culture of Northern […]




    A Nordic fairytale in…Utrecht?

    As a Dutch copywriter – editor – journalist I don’t usually write in English, but when Nordophile’s Sarah Surgey – whom I ‘met’ on Instagram – asked me to cover the Nordic Delight Festival in my hometown Utrecht I thought: why not give it a try! The undiscovered culture of Northern Europe brought to an innovating local music venue in the centre of a historical university town. It might be a positive new experience to a middle-aged guy (54) like me, normally covering city development and architecture. Well…I can tell you now, it was an experience more than worthwhile.

    Utsolgt’

     

     

    Not only did the unexpected request from Nordophile’s Sarah Surgey to cover the Nordic Delight Festival trigger my interest, I was also intrigued as to the fact that the festival at first did not get any attention in what’s called ‘Uitagenda Utrecht’, which claims to give full insight in cultural events across the city. Woud this affect the success of this relatively small festival, still unknown to many? Probably not, with around 300 visitors the 2014 edition in EKKO was ‘utsolgt’, Norwegian for sold out! Not a mainstream festival, Nordic Delight isn’t the first that brings high-caliber performers to the picturesque city of Utrecht. Until recently it was Summer Darkness that turned Utrecht gothic-black in a more than special gathering of spirits once every year since 2003. And November this year it’s Le Guess Who? that again welcomes international upcoming bands and artists as well as international visitors. The initiative for a Nordic Delight Festival in Utrecht started in 2013. Founding fathers Arne Dee and Ad Pontier successfully organized two festivals and several events in Utrecht since then, always focused on Scandinavian music and culture. This September 26 Nordic Delight again offered a chance to experience the most talented upcoming music acts, from Norway this time, for the first time in the Netherlands.

     

    DSC_7247

     

    Getting tuned

    Not being much of a Nordophile myself the complete line up was unknown to me. Live performances by Fay Wildhagen, Emilie Nicolas and Bloody Beach, names that did not ring any bells to me. Then again, set to play their first shows in the Netherlands it would probably also be a first acquaintance to many. I decided to check them out before visiting the festival and doing so l had to adjust all of my (somewhat mainstream) musicality to tune into the styles of music they represented. In that way, and perhaps in many ways, covering Nordic Delight promised to be like discovering an entirely new world. Seeing some YouTube vids of the young but already eccentric Emilie Nicolas for instance, made it clear to me that she could bewilder me even more performing live at our local music venue EKKO, famous for its widely renewing agenda. Nicolas’ enchanting, melancholy and sometimes ecstatic songs made one shiver inside. ‘Amazing work on sound, vocals, electro-pop arrangements and a great richness of colours, true emotion and sensibility’ someone strikingly defined her music. For instance ‘Psterio‘ from her 2014 debut album ‘Like I’m a warrior’ (released in the Netherlands June this year) brought Northern Europe straight into my living room the way only Volvo did before with their ‘Made by Sweden’ campaign.

     

     

    Different dimensions

    Besides prizewinning Nicolas, without any doubt the most famous act in the Nordic Delight line up, the other acts deserve some special attention as well. Fay Wildhagen, the young singer-songwriter and guitarist with her impressive band brings songs with an organic mix of folk, rock and other genres. Straight from the heart and with a wide range of emotions, from small and modest, melancholy at times (as in this beautiful song), too loud and extrovert. Not always easy listening but pure, intense and very vivid. Her promising debut album ‘Snow’ was recently released in the Netherlands. And then there’s the five-piece band Bloody Beach with their self-proclaimed ‘tropidelica’, a colourful and warm cocktail of rock, psychedelia, dub, afrobeat, disco, punk, reggae and pop. Awaiting their final breakthrough with the release of their second album next year, performing at Nordic Delight might warm us up for what’s to come. But it’s not only the main acts that draw attention. The program contains music, a wonderful selection of short films and a Norwegian dinner. So, hungry in many ways, I headed for EKKO on this Saturday night.

    Stunning and ecstatic

    There I was in the midst of a mostly young, alternative audience that at first seemed to be more in place. The atmosphere was relaxed and friendly and obviously everyone was curious for what the night would bring. None of us, however, seemed prepared for the impact of this evening. Where the sit down Norwegian dinner appeared to be reserved for other limited guests and was not open for all of the media, I arrived just before the stage opened at 20.00 hours. With the short films and musical performances programmed at the same time, for me it was more than logical to focus on music this evening and I’m glad I did. Almost traditional at times it was the stunning and sometimes ecstatic performance of the beautiful Emilie Nicolas and her impressive band that brought up a variety of emotions to probably every single visitor this night. What can one say about an overwhelming first acquaintance with this group of very modest young artists that in my opinion deserve a world stage. I’m convinced we’re gonna hear more of them soon…

     

     

    A warm embrace

    Also impressive was the first Dutch performance of the somewhat unordinary but charming Fay Wildhagen and band. Don’t ask me why, but to be honest, I was not expecting them to be as convincing as they were this evening. I was wrong there! Coming in from Hamburg/Germany, where she and Emilie Nicolas performed the night before at Reeperbahn Festival, Wildhagen rocked the house in many ways. Modest and fragile, folky at times and then up-tempo, loud and strong with a great sense of musicality and impressive guitar playing by Wildhagen herself. It felt like a warm embrace with this talented and promising young artist. And then, closing up Nordic Delight, there was Bloody Beach that finally made the audience move with their down to earth mix of music styles. In many ways a somewhat peace loving hippie style, dreamy rock perhaps, rather than the heavy metal appearance they seem to have. They did great on stage and knew how to take the house along with their infectious music.

    Catching up

    Looking back on the overwhelming experience that Nordic Delight was, it seems I’ve been missing out on the fast growing interest in Nordic culture. Working on this article, for instance, I discovered NordicVibes.com, a Dutch version of Nordophile.com which is, to my surprise, based in Utrecht. So without any doubt I’ve got some catching up to do and writing this article might be just the start of that!

    Maurice Hengevel Twitter 

    All photos credited to Wim Pontier

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    Norwegian/British band – Sun Up

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 24th September 2015
  • Nordophile is always on the lookout to bring you fresh Nordic music sounds which are creating ripples on the music scene. Occasionally known for its darker melancholy sounds running alongside with upbeat electronic pop, the acts coming out of the Nordics are certainly welcomed in countries fixated on the Nordic genre right now. We were […]




    Nordophile is always on the lookout to bring you fresh Nordic music sounds which are creating ripples on the music scene. Occasionally known for its darker melancholy sounds running alongside with upbeat electronic pop, the acts coming out of the Nordics are certainly welcomed in countries fixated on the Nordic genre right now.

    We were very excited to learn about a London/Norway mixed band called ‘Sun Up’ and wanted to find out more about this group whose track has been shared on Soundcloud this week.

    Listen to the ethereal dreamy voice from Frøydis Erås backed by upbeat pop music.

     

    Frøydis Erås – Voice
    John de Smet – Keys, Samples & Voice
    Maxim Fernandez – Guitar
    Howard de Smet – Bass
    Andrew Lusher – Drums, Samples & Voice

    If you tipped a scoop of Scandinavian snow, a handful of Hackney muck, and five friends in a blender, you’d get Sun Up, a new electro-speckled pop band hailing from Norway and London. Led by frontwoman Frøydis Erås, this five-piece uniquely weave together the introspective quirk of rural Scandinavia with the Technicolor clatter of metropolitan life.

    Sun Up’s first track ‘Machines’, a bedroom demo recorded and uploaded with minimal fanfare, immediately caught the attention of music tastemaker blogs such as Crack In The Road, Breaking More Waves and Gold Flake Paint.

    At their third ever gig, Sun Up were spotted by veteran booking agent Dave Chumbley at Primary Talent (Lana Del Rey, Alt-J, Wolf Alice) and spent the remainder of the year supporting the likes of Childhood, The Joy Formidable, and Phoria.

    Sun Up’s official debut track ‘Anchors’ is the crystallization of the band’s distinctive Anglo-Scandi DNA. Recorded during the pre-dawn hours of studio downtime by up-and-coming producer Neil Tollitt (Låpsley, Swim Deep, Pussy Riot), ‘Anchors’ is a glittering pop Trojan Horse hiding a bleak, broken heart.

    ‘Bursting with joy but tinged with something that sits between desire and the crushing weight of regret… understated brilliance’ – Gold Flake Paint

    ‘One of our new favourite voices… it took us just twenty-five seconds to fall in love’ – Breaking More Waves

    ‘Fantastic… Sun Up are well worth keeping an eye on’ – Crack In The Road

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    Tromso on a Budget

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  • 21st September 2015
  • One of our guest bloggers here at Nordophile is back. Vanessa Brune made the move from Germany to Tromso in the Arctic of Norway. Whilst running her own site blogging about life in Tromso, Van also knows the true meaning of being a Nordophile and what Nordophiles want to see and do, so she has […]




    One of our guest bloggers here at Nordophile is back. Vanessa Brune made the move from Germany to Tromso in the Arctic of Norway. Whilst running her own site blogging about life in Tromso, Van also knows the true meaning of being a Nordophile and what Nordophiles want to see and do, so she has started guest writing for us with this in mind. Maybe one day you will make the move as well…….

     

     

    Tromso on a Budget – 10 Free Things to do on your visit

    Hello fellow Nordophiles! I’m so glad to be back again! In case you missed my last post about Tromso, my name is Vanessa and I’m a German expat living in Tromso in Arctic Norway. I blog about my life and travels in Scandinavia and the Arctic over at Snow in Tromso and am here today to spread a bit of my love for Arctic Norway!

    I’m currently a student and living in Norway isn’t exactly the cheapest thing to do. Neither is visiting so I completely understand your worries that visiting Tromso might be too expensive. Therefore, I’m here today to tell you: it is possible to visit the Arctic on a budget! Aside from looking out for cheap flights and booking a private room instead of a room at a hotel, there are a couple of things you can do and see in Tromso completely for free. Today I’m showing you the 10 best!

     

     

    Hunt the Northern Lights

    This is probably the best about Tromso: the Northern Lights. And yes, you can see them for free! Of course, there are Northern Lights tours for tourists which is great when the sky is cloudy and they drive you to less cloudy areas. However if the sky is clear, you’ll most likely see them in the middle of Tromso too! I can see them from my bedroom and I live in the city center! Although, if you want to take really nice pictures of the lights, you’d need to get away from the lights of the city. No problem though as Tromso Island is big and you can get outside of the city within a half hour walk.

     

     

    Experience the Midnight Sun

    Interested in more natural phenomena of the Arctic? If you visit Tromso during summertime, you’ll experience the Midnight Sun (aka 24 hours of daylight) included in your stay. It’s so nice to take a walk around the city centre in the middle of the night while it’s still bright outside.

     

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    Go on a Hike

    Speaking of going on a walk, the Arctic nature can best be experienced outside of the city on a hike through the forests or in the mountains. There are so many hiking routes for you to choose from and all of them are clearly marked. My favourites: walking around Lake Prestvannet, hiking from the Northern tip of Tromso Island to the Southern tip or going up Mountain Storstein or Mountain Tromsdalstind on the mainland.

     

    The Southern Tip of Tromso Island

     

    Visit Perspektivet

    Tromso also has some culture for you to offer and some of it is even for free. Perspektivet, for example, is a photography museum with changing exhibitions – all of them for free!

     

    Perspektivet

     

    Visit the Northern Norway Art Museum & the Gallery of Contemporary Art

    If you’re interested in art, the Northern Norway Art Museum and the Gallery of Contemporary Art should be on your must-see list of places for your Tromso visit. Both are free of charge and both host wonderful Norwegian art you might not be able to see anywhere else.

     

    Gallery of Contemporary Art

     

    Get on board of the Hurtigruten

    Want to see what it’s like to cruise around on Norway’s coastal steamer? The Hurtigruten can be found at Tromso harbour every day from 2.30 to 6.30 pm and can be visited free of charge. You can have a look around the ship, drink coffee in the cafeteria and even use the whirlpool on deck while having a fabulous view on the Arctic Cathedral.

     

    Hurtigruten

     

    Have some Beach Time

    Yes, Tromso has a beach and even though it might not be warm enough to go for a swim during your visit, you should definitely head out to Telegrafbukta anyway. It’s such a beautiful place in the South of Tromso Island and the perfect place for an evening walk at the ocean!

     

    Telegrafbukta - the beach of Tromso

     

    Visit the Botanic Garden

    The Arctic-Alpine Botanical Garden in Tromso is showcasing plants from the world’s Arctic and Alpine regions, like the Himalaya and the Rocky Mountains, and is situated right below the University. To walk through the Gardens is free and should be on your list of things to do if you visit the city between May and October!

     

     

    See Reindeers and Polar Bears

    Tromso is in the Arctic so of course you’ll see reindeers and polar bears! Okay, the polar bear might only be a stuffed one at Mack Brewery but you can also see real reindeers near the University (in captivity) and over on Tromso’s neighbouring island Kvaloya (wild), besides seeing them all over the city centre for decorative purposes.

     

    Reindeer

     

    Take in the view of Tromso from above

    Tromso is such a beautiful place – and even more so if seen from above! The sight of Tromso Island, in the middle of the fjord between the mainland and the island Kvaloya is just so amazing! You can have this view after hiking up Mountain Storstein and as this might be a tough hike not exactly suitable for less well-trained people, you can always go for a much easier hike from the University to the ski jumping tower and look at the mainland and great parts of Tromso from that one. The views will be equally nice, promised!

     

    Tromso from above

     

    You see, Tromso might be in the Arctic and one of the most expensive countries of Europe, but it’s definitely possible to visit the city and see a lot while being on a budget!

    If you want to read more about Tromso and my life in Arctic Norway, head on over to Snow in Tromso and leave a comment below telling me what you’d like to do if you’d visit Tromso one day!

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    Screen City Festival – Stavanger, Norway

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 10th September 2015
  • Screen City festival 15th-18th October “an expanded cinematic experience about Labour in Norway” will be dedicated to presenting the moving image in public spaces and to exploring the relationship between moving image, sound, and architecture. The festival’s format expands the borders of cinematic experience – reflecting upon the line between the filmatic and the non-filmatic.     […]




    Screen City festival 15th-18th October “an expanded cinematic experience about Labour in Norway” will be dedicated to presenting the moving image in public spaces and to exploring the relationship between moving image, sound, and architecture. The festival’s format expands the borders of cinematic experience – reflecting upon the line between the filmatic and the non-filmatic.

     

     

    Screen City – Moving Image Festival Stavanger presents: Labour & The City In-between. Artists Harun Farocki, Antje Ehmann, Rosa Barba, and an extended list of Czech and Nordic video artists takes over the city, October 15-18th 2015: exploring the temporal, motional and spatial qualities of labour in our current post-industrial climate.

     

    Stavanger, Norway

     

    Curated by Daniela Arriado (CL/NO).

    The point of departure for this year’s program is the post-industrial climate we meet in Europe today. This climate has left us with fluctuating definitions of labour, exploitation of labour, and an unknown economic future. How do these industrial changes affect a city`s architectonic and social rooms? Through the streets of Stavanger, from the Concert Hall to the old industrial port, you will find artworks activating the buildings’ facades. Every building tells a story, and these stories form our city. With the aim of transforming buildings from objects into subjects, we have invited artists – who explore the temporal, motional and spatial qualities of labour in our current post-industrial climate – to present their works in the public spaces of Stavanger.

     

     

    la•bor

    to perform labor; work.
    to strive, as toward a goal; work hard
    productive activity, esp. for the sake of economic gain.
    physical or mental work, esp. of a hard or fatiguing kind.

    The point of departure for this year’s program is the post-industrial climate we meet in Europe today. This climate has left us with fluxuating definitions of labour, exploitation of labour, and an unknown economic future. How do these industrial changes affect a city`s architectonic and social rooms? Through the streets of Stavanger, from the Concert Hall to the old industrial port, you will find artworks activating the buildings’ facades. Every building tells a story, and these stories form our city. With the aim of transforming buildings from objects into subjects, we have invited artists – who explore the temporal, motional and spatial qualities of labour in our current post-industrial climate – to present their works in the public spaces of Stavanger.

     

     

    Old industrial port where  several of the works will be presented

     

    Featured Artists

    Ane Hjort Guttu (NO)

    ARTIST TALK & PREVIEW SCREENING: TIME PASSES
    FRIDAY 16 OCTOBER, 2-4PM
    ROGALAND KUNSTSENTER

    Ane Hjort Guttu presents her recent film related to her investigation into issues of power, freedom and the role of art and artists within political systems. Time Passes (2013) is a 45 min film produced for the 2015 Festival Exhibition in Bergen. Time Passes portrays the art student Damla and her ongoing performative project – begging in the streets of Bergen. Ane Hjort Guttu is an artist, writer and curator based in Oslo. Through video works, picture collections, sculpture and photography her recent work has focused on the issues of power and freedom in the Scandinavian post-welfare state. She also writes analytical as well as poetical texts, and several of her projects discuss art and architectural history.

     

    Photo credit; Ane Hjort

     

    Nils Henrik Asheim (NO)

    ORGELNATT
    FRIDAY 16 OCTOBER, 9-11PM
    STAVANGER CONCERT HALL

    Composer Nils Henrik Asheim (b.1960) combines his career as a performer with regular artist collaborations on projects integrating spatial and theatrical elements. Asheim started out as a pupil of Olav Anton Thommessen and made his début as a composer at the early age of fifteen. Since 1991 Asheim has lived in Stavanger where he is active as a composer, performer and organizer, and not least as the principal initiator of the founding of Tou Scene, an alternative centre for contemporary arts. From September 2012, Asheim has been the organist at Stavanger Concert Hall. Orgelnatt – Organ Night – is a concept where Nils Henrik Asheim invites guest musicians to create a concert event around the organ, exploiting the instrument’s ability to create vast soundscapes. With the help of time and space, we invite the audience to submerge themselves in sound. Orgelnatt has since 2013 been hosted by Stavanger Konserthus. During Screen City Festival, Nils Henrik will perform together with Slovakian artists Pjoni (SK) and Ján Šicko (SK), transforming the concert hall and the organ into an electro-acoustic landscape utilizing mechanical midi management of the organ, and processing sounds from this. The production is part of the Orgel Night program, presenting Norwegian sound artists and musicians like Kjetil Brandsdal and Susanna Wallumrød. The evening will melt into a club program curated by Tou Scene: Electro Motives, presenting live DJ sets by André Bratten (NO) and Jennifer Cardini (FR)

     

    Photo credit; Nils Henrik Asheim

     

    Knut Åsdam (NO)

    MOBIL EGRESS
    DAILY, 6PM-MIDNIGHT
    LORRY, RYFYLKEGATA/MATHALLEN

    Mobil Egress is a touring lorry; an architectural art/film/cinema installation with the film Egress built inside the back compartment. It functions as a mobile cinema and is built up from installation elements to create an architectonic environment. The piece merges art and film distributed in an unusual way. It looks at contemporary Norway and its psychology through themes of work, class, oil and the material world. Egress is a narrative set in a gas station in the edge-lands of Oslo. The main characters work at the bottom of the oil company hierarchy and are engulfed in the everyday and the dark economic and psychological shadows of their society. Egress is the story of a young woman who deals with her everyday work situation with independence and stubbornness in her work and life in the periphery of the city. The film shows relationships between control and independence, about labour, class and work, but it is also a poetic film about a socially insecure edge-land of the city—and about a psychological flip side or cost of the everyday, somewhere near the bottom of the huge economic ladder of the oil industry which secures Norway’s stability. Knut Åsdam lives and works in Oslo, Norway.

     

    Photo credit; Knut Asdam

     

    Beathe C Rønning (NO)

    MEDITATIONS ON WORK III
    DAILY, 6PM-MIDNIGHT
    ROGALAND KUNSTSENTER

    For the past eight Beathe C Rønning has been filming manual and mechanical work processes. What interests her in these Meditations is the choreography that comes straight from the body, and from the routine operation of machines. Or that doesn’t. In practical terms, Meditations on Work is a three-channel video piece with a specially composed soundtrack, a soundless video composition showing sequences of people at work overlaid with scrolling text (II), and a booklet with stills and text. Each sequence is prosaic and commonplace, rooted in the here and now. The steady pulse of work that goes on around us all the time. For Rønning, it is here we find the greatest poetic potential, because here the beauty is subtle yet accessible. “Work is of two kinds: first, altering the position of matter at or near the earth’s surface relatively to other such matter; second, telling other people to do so.” (Bertrand Russell) An artist’s work falls between the manual and the abstract. Rønning neither give nor follow orders. She observes, films and reflects, refining impressions through the rhythm of composition, the pulse of the soundtrack, the focus of the text. “Copenhagen, Kvinesdal, Torp, Oslo, Berlin, Lier, Drammen, Sande: I must thank everyone who has allowed me to film them, and for all the goodwill I have met with.” (Beathe C. Rønning) During the Screen City Festival, Beathe will present Meditations on Work – edition 3, with a newly composed text. The work is presented on the Rogaland Kunstsenter facade window. (Credits: Peter Cribbs.no)

     

    Photo credit; Beate C Ronning

    For more information about other events taking place at #Screencity and the full range of artists appearing or taking part please head to 2015.screencity.no

    We would also like to thank Screen city for their text and photos.

    Featured image credited to Mirjam Struppek 

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    Ultima – Oslo Contemporary Music Festival

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 7th September 2015
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    Ultima – Oslo Contemporary Music Festival takes place September 10-19. This is a fascinating festival which we thoroughly recommend as it takes us through a celebration of music through collaborations, talks, commissions, exhibitions, improvised performances and of course music from every corner of genres. Held in Oslo this is the perfect opportunity for a Nordophile to […]




    Ultima – Oslo Contemporary Music Festival takes place September 10-19. This is a fascinating festival which we thoroughly recommend as it takes us through a celebration of music through collaborations, talks, commissions, exhibitions, improvised performances and of course music from every corner of genres.

    Held in Oslo this is the perfect opportunity for a Nordophile to explore this cultural mecca of a Nordic city and immerse in the music culture through the festival.

     

     

    Rikksscenen

     

    About

    Ultima is the premiere contemporary music festival in the Nordic region. The festival became a designated “knutepunkt” (cultural hub) in 2006 and is supported by the Ministry of Culture and Church Affairs and Oslo City Council. Ultima is a foundation with 17 members, all of them professional cultural institutions or organisations.

    The festival takes place during September and is staged at venues all around Oslo. Our events are staged both in large, established venues such as the Norwegian National Opera & Ballet, Oslo Concert Hall and the University of Oslo’s Great Hall as well as in small clubs, shop premises, industrial premises, museums, schools and outdoors.

    The Ultima Festival aims to promote artistic distinctiveness, trends and innovation and to make music of a high artistic standard accessible by everyone.

    His Royal Highness Crown Prince Haakon is the patron of Ultima.

     

    Featured Events

     

     

    Below are just a few of some of the events which are taking place. Head over to the Ultima website to find out about the other events which are taking place at the festival.

     

    Elisabeth Vatn: The color Beneath.

    Ekeberg park 6.30pm, September 10th

     

     

    Exclusive sunrise and sunset concerts with Elisabeth Vatn in James Turrell’s light installations in Ekeberg sculpture park.

    The Color Beneath by musician and composer ELISABETH VATN was conceived in James Turrell’s light installations in the old water reservoir on Ekeberg. Between 10–13 September, Vatn (harmonium, Meråker clarinet, bagpipes) performs withANDERS RØINE (langeleik, mouth harp, violin).

    Contemporary artist JAMES TURRELL works with perception, colour, light and space. The two location-specific works Ganzfeld: Double Vision and Skyspace: The Color Beneath were both created for the old water reservoir in 2013. While Ganzfeldexplores the way colours affect our senses, Skyspace makes use of the chromatic interaction between the concert space and the sky at dawn and dusk.

    In The Color Beneath the composer and performer turn their encounter with the installation into music, partly following the composition and partly through improvisation. Consequently, none of the concerts performed in this unique setting will be identical.

    The Color Beneath album was recorded during autumn 2014 and is released during Ultima 2015. The concerts are staged in cooperation with nyMusikk, Ekebergparken and Grappa Musikkforlag with contributions by Fond for Utøvende Kunstnere.

     

    Teknisk Museum, 10 AM

    Installation throughout festival

     

     

    ‘We are so used to seeing that suddenly we forgot how to look, so used to hearing that suddenly we forgot to listen.’

    Every movement we see in nature can be perceived as a visual concert, like a storm of birds moving together making astonishing patterns, or snow falling from the sky and touching the ground.Quintetto is based on the study of casual movement of objects or living creatures used as input for the production of sounds. The basic concept is to reveal what the ‘invisible concerts’ of everyday life. In this installation, the scene is five aquariums with a goldfish in each. The movement of the five fishes is captured by a video camera that translates their movements in digital sound signals/music in real time.

     

    Den Norske Opera & Ballett, Provesalen.

    MATTHEW SHLOMOWITZ: LECTURE ABOUT BAD MUSIC (WP)  ALEXANDER SCHUBERT: SENSATE FOCUS  September 11th 5pm

     

     

    Can music really be bad in itself or is ‘bad’ really nothing other than a subjective opinion?

    That is the question MATTHEW SHLOMOWITZ asks in Lecture About Bad Music, which was specially composed for the Anglo-Belgian octet. The work, which was written for lecturer, clarinet, electric guitar, synthesiser and violin, has been commissioned by Ultima and will receive its debut performance here. Australian-born Shlomowitz draws on elements from many fields and genres, employing musical demonstrations and recreations of psychological experiments to examine differences between musical experience and musical material.

    ALEXANDER SCHUBERT‘s Sensate Focus combines light and image, allowing lighting effects take on the role of a fifth performer to a quartet of musicians. In the work, Schubert, who studied bioinformatics, experiments with the interfaces between gesticular movements and musical sounds, where the performers’ physical movements and position in the room are essential elements of the composition.

    PLUS MINUS ENSEMBLE specialises in new music and modern key works. It is particularly known for its interest in avant-garde, experimental and conceptual music, such as Stockhausen’s seminal work from 1963, from which the ensemble takes its name.

     

    OCA (Office for Contemporary Art)

    September 13th 6.pm PRE-TALK AT OCA 5PM. INTRODUCTION BY KATYA GARCÍA-ANTÓN, DIRECTOR OF OCA.

     

     

    CAMILLE NORMENT, who is Norway’s entry to the 56th Venice Biennale, began her collaboration with composer and writer DAVID TOOP at Café OTO in London in 2014. The collaboration resulted in a performance at the Biennale. The performance explores the legends, stories and mysteries of the depth of the oceans through sound. It is still being continually developed, and will be performed at Ultima in September.

    The Oslo-based American artist CAMILLE NORMENT’S practice includes performance, installation, drawing and sound. She explores how the body is interconnected with its environment through sound, and contemplates on the power of dissonance to create spaces for new ways of thinking. DAVID TOOP is a British composer, writer and professor of Audio Culture and Improvisation at the London College of Communication. The third edition of his debut book, Rap Attack, has just been released. He has recorded five solo albums since he released Ocean of Sound in 1995.

    In cooperation with nyMusikk and the Office for Contemporary Art Norway.

     

    Black Box Teater; Annie Dorsen – Yesterday Tomorrow

    September 18th, 7pm & September 19th, 6pm

     

     

    AN EVOLUTIONARY MUSICAL

    Annie Dorsen’s Yesterday Tomorrow is a musical that breaks most of the rules for this genre. Unlike traditional musicals, the music for this musical is created during the course of the performance with the help of computer-generated algorithms, which means that the final result is different every time. The only points of reference are the two well-known songs Yesterday by The Beatles andTomorrow from the musical Annie.

    Based on evolutionary processes such as mutation and natural selection, the algorithms determine the most appropriate route from the first song to the next, or from what has passed to what is to come. As a result, the performance stands as an expression of the unpredictable nature of the present, as a contrast to a familiar past and the notion of a happy future. The music is performed by three singers who continually receive information about which rhythm, pitch and lyrics to sing. The result is an intelligent, humorous yet disturbing encounter between man and machine.

    Annie Dorsen has previously work in film, dance and theatre, and in recent years has been particularly interested in artificial intelligence and digital performance. The Yesterday Tomorrowproject was developed in cooperation with Pierre Godard and Greg Bellar from the Institute for Research and Coordination in Acoustics/Music (IRCAM.).

    Concept, direction: Annie Dorsen. Music director: Joanna Bailie. Algorithm design: Pierre Godard. Sound design: Greg Beller. Video systems design: Ryan Holsopple. Lighting design and technical direction: Bruno Pocheron, Ruth Waldeyer. Producer: Alexandra Rosenberg. Performers: Hai-Ting Chinn, Jeffrey Gavett & Natalie Raybould. Coproduction: Holland Festival, Black Box Teater, Performance Space 122, La Villette – Résidences d’Artistes 2015, L’Hippodrome, scène nationale de Douai, Théâtre de Gennevilliers with Festival d’automne à Paris, Le Maillon-Wacken – Scene européenne – Strasbourg, théâtre Garonne – Scène européenne – Toulouse. Supported by: Mount Tremper Arts, Abrons Arts Center, New York State Council on the Arts.

     

    CEO & Artistic Director – Lars Pettern Hagen

     

     

    “The board appreciates that Lars Petter Hagen will continue to manage the festival for another three years,” says Stein Gullberg, Chairman of the Board. “Mr. Hagen has brought an innovative spirit to the festival program and steered its administrative advancement with a steady hand. Public attendance is on a rise, and Ultima is meeting with ever growing international attention. It’s important to make the best use of this potential, which is best served by the continuity we achieve by extending this appointment. Lars Petter Hagen’s extensive network as well as the fact that he is held in esteem by a broad music and art environment, both within Norway and internationally.”

    Lars Petter Hagen has accepted the offer. “Oslo is a fabulous music town in constant growth, making the Ultima Festival one of the most exciting places to work in the whole world right now. I look forward to another three years with unpredictable musical encounters, dialog with the public and artists, good colleagues and partners,” he says.

     

    Ultima Academy

     

     

    How does art affect nature? How does nature affect art? For its 2015 edition, Ultima Academy invites scientists, music researchers and artists to talk about nature and discuss our attitude to it.

    Head over to Ultima.no to read more about the collaborations and what you can expect to see!

    Special thanks to Ultima for text and photos.

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    The Nordic Council Film Prize 2015

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 31st August 2015
  • The Nordic Council Film Prize nominations for 2015 are out. The purpose of The Nordic Council Film Prize is to support the production of Nordic films in order to strengthen the Nordic film industry, thereby in the long term contributing to the strengthening of Nordic films internationally.     The winner will be a feature […]




    The Nordic Council Film Prize nominations for 2015 are out.

    The purpose of The Nordic Council Film Prize is to support the production of Nordic films in order to strengthen the Nordic film industry, thereby in the long term contributing to the strengthening of Nordic films internationally.

     

     

    The winner will be a feature film that is rooted in Nordic culture, is of high artistic quality and stands out through its artistic originality to form a harmonious work. Innovation within the film genre will also be given positive consideration when comparing the nominated films. The films nominated must primarily be recorded in a Nordic language to be considered for the Film Prize.

    The prize was awarded for the first time on a trial basis in 2002 in connection with the Nordic Council’s 50th anniversary. It became permanent in 2005 and has since been awarded along with the Nordic Council’s other prizes for music, literature, and nature and the environment.

     

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    The Nordic Council Film Prize 2009 was awarded to the Danish film director and scriptwriter Lars von Trier and producer Meta Louise Foldager for the film ANTICHRIST.

     

    A member of the jury from every Nordic country

    Each Nordic country appoints one jury member and a substitute. These people are film connoisseurs but must be independent of the film industry in their home country and have no personal financial interest in the nominated films.

     

    Nordic Jury appoints the prize winner

    The national jury members form a Nordic Adjudication Committee. The national jury member proposes the nominations from his/her own country. The film nominations are made public at the beginning of September. After that it is the combined Nordic adjudication committee which decides which of the nominated films – one from each Nordic country – will win the prize.

    Films from the Faroe Islands, Greenland and Åland are outside the countries quota of one film each. Nominated films from these countries must be submitted to the Nordic Adjudication Committee. When a Faroese, Greenlandic or Ålandic film has to be judged a jury member from that country is co-opted onto the committee.

     

     

    Film prize divided between three main functions

    The Nordic Council Film Prize is administered by the Nordic Film and TV Fund and is worth DKK 350,000 (approx. €47,000), and thus has the same value as the literature, nature and the environment, and music prizes. The prize money is to be shared between the scriptwriter, the director and the producer, which underlines that film as an art form is the result of close co-operation between these three main functions.

    The Film Prize is usually awarded with the other Nordic prizes for literature, music and nature and the environment during the Nordic Council’s Ordinary Session in the autumn at a special ceremony.

    Previous winners of the Film Prize include Danish Per Fly’s film ‘Drabet’ (‘Manslaughter’) and the film ‘Zozo’ by Josef Fares from Sweden.

     

    The Nordic Council Film Prize Nominations 2015

     

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    Stille hjerte (Silent Heart) – Denmark

     

    Masterfully crafted and played to perfection, director Bille August and screenwriter Christian Torpe tell a warm-hearted story about an unforgettable weekend where a family has to deal with a mother’s wish to die. In the typically Nordic tradition of exorcising all skeletons from the closet, the film dissects one of the most difficult challenges a family can face – saying goodbye to a loved one.

     

    He ovat paenneet (They Have Escaped) – Finland

     

    A gripping coming-of-age drama, a thrilling road movie, a drug-induced fantasy and then some! Jukka-Pekka Valkeapää’s They Have Escaped flirts with genre characteristics only to rise above their respective dynamics and to metamorphose into an expressionistic, no holds barred adult fairytale. The exquisite cinematography combined with a thoughtful, multifaceted soundtrack adds to film’s strong, dreamlike ambiance.

     

    Fúsi (Virgin Mountain) – Iceland

     

    With a delicate touch, director Dagur Kári´s Virgin Mountain is a moving coming-of-age portrait of a gentle giant. In a skilfully nuanced way this humanistic film conveys both inner torment and offbeat charm, while its symbolic interaction of items big and small conveys such universal themes as goodness, giving and grace.

     

    Mot naturen (Out of Nature) – Norway

     

    In Out of Nature, Ole Giæver portrays a self-reflection of our modern lives and today’s Nordic man. A personal yet forthright narrative conveys a collage of mental imagery to express memories, hopes, dreams, and emotive atmospheres, yet all in a good humour that addresses embarrassment, shame and pain.

     

    Gentlemen- Sweden

     

    Gentlemen takes us on a winding journey of a story in which time perspectives and identities are as fluid as the boundary between dreams and fantasy. The attention to detail in the film’s various expressions culminates in a uniquely personal, playful and self-reflective work.

    Photos & text credited to Norden.org

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    Nordic Delight – Norwegian Night

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 26th August 2015
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    Nordophile has always noted the Nordic connection between the Nordics and the Netherlands. Close ties are going to be made even stronger when Nordic Delight put on a Norwegian Night in the cultural hub city, Utrecht.     Nordic Delight Norwegian Night with Emilie Nicolas, Bloody Beach & Fay Wildhagen The organisation of Nordic Delight […]




    Nordophile has always noted the Nordic connection between the Nordics and the Netherlands. Close ties are going to be made even stronger when Nordic Delight put on a Norwegian Night in the cultural hub city, Utrecht.

     

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    Nordic Delight Norwegian Night with Emilie Nicolas, Bloody Beach & Fay Wildhagen

    The organisation of Nordic Delight has announced the next Scandinavian event today. On Saturday, September, 26th music venue EKKO in Utrecht is all about Norway. With live performances by Emilie Nicolas, Bloody Beach and Fay Wildhagen Nordic Delight brings three talented high potential acts from Norway to Utrecht. Besides live music, short films by Norwegian makers are screened and there is a limited number of combi tickets available including a three-course Norwegian dinner.

     

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    Fay Wildhagen is a young folk singer-songwriter and guitarist from Oslo and one of the biggest promises of Norway. With a full band including violin and cello she brings an organic blend of folk, rock and other genres with lots of passion and charm and a very unique sound. After a summer full of performances at all important Norwegian festivals, she will play at several international (showcase) festivals later this year, but first she will make her debut in the Netherlands at our Norwegian Night.

    FayWildhagen.com

     

    Bloody-Beach-Photo-by-Tore-Winsents

    Photo credit Tore Winsents

     

    Who remembers Kakkmaddafakka? Bloody Beach are also from Bergen and guarantee a similar party! A cheerful mix of pop, rock, psychedelia, with elements of afrobeat, dub and surf rock, which they describe as ‘tropidelica’. Next year, with the release of their second album, a breakthrough is expected, including shows at Dutch festivals, but at Nordic Delight you can get a first taste.

    BloodyBeachMusic.com

     

     

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    Emilie Nicolas is the most well-known name in her own country and was already on the wishlist of Nordic Delight for a while. The Norwegian singer and composer is praised for her powerful vocals and wistful lyrics, accompanied by a sparse and somber backdrop of electronic beats. Emilie Nicolas won several awards as best live act and for her debut album, which was released in the Netherlands in June this year. In September, she will tour through Europe and gives an exclusive show at Nordic Delight.

    Nordic Delight organised two festivals and several events in Utrecht in the last three years, always focussed on Scandinavian music and culture. On September 26 Nordic Delight offers you the chance again to experience the most talented upcoming music acts from Norway for the first time in the Netherlands.

    EmilieNicolas.com

     

    Head over to Nordic Delight for more information and support this Nordic event at EKKO Utrecht.

     

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    Tickets are now for sale here: http://bit.ly/1EglOP5

    More info: www.nordicdelight.nl

    Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1633009736915265

     

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    Guest Blog – Autumnal Tromso

  • Guest
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  • 25th August 2015
  • Here at Nordophile we are excited to be bringing you some guest bloggers and new writers to our site over the next few weeks. We start with a guest blog from a Nordophile who was lucky enough to make the move to one of the Nordic countries. She blogs about her experiences and has kindly offered […]




    Here at Nordophile we are excited to be bringing you some guest bloggers and new writers to our site over the next few weeks.

    We start with a guest blog from a Nordophile who was lucky enough to make the move to one of the Nordic countries. She blogs about her experiences and has kindly offered to give you an insight into the Arctic city she now calls home and why the season which is upon us, is the best time to visit!

     

     

    Autumnal Tromso – A Magical Time

    Hello, fellow Nordophiles! My name is Vanessa and I’m a German expat living in Tromso in Arctic Norway. I blog  about my life and travels in Scandinavia and the Arctic over at Snow in Tromso and am here today to spread a bit of my love for Arctic Norway!

    Two years ago, I first made the journey to Tromso. It was October and therefore, cold, rainy and grey. I only stayed in the city for one night and one day before embarking on a cruise to the North Cape, but that one night and one day were enough to fall in love with Tromso. Now two years later, I’m living in the biggest city of the European Arctic and am looking forward to the beginning of autumn again. It’s a magical time for so many reasons!

     

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    The first thing I saw of Tromso was it’s snow-covered mountains, slowly appearing beneath the clouds while looking out of the plane window. Once I got out of the plane, fresh, crisp mountain air welcomed me and even though it was colder than I had expected and I was absolutely freezing, there was something about that moment that I’ll never forget.

    Later that day, I went on my first stroll through the city centre and found a cute, little, Norwegian seaside town that even looked colourful on a rainy day. I mean, red, yellow and even turquoise houses? On a dark day in autumn, these colours pop even more and look so pretty with the golden leaves of all the trees. It took only one hour wandering through the streets of Tromso until I knew that I could live in that city.

    Fast forward a year. I moved to Tromso in August and after about two weeks of summer, autumn arrived. I spent my first weeks in the city going hiking, waiting for the first Northern Lights of the season and experiencing the first snow of the season – in late September that is! These first weeks were absolutely amazing and it is therefore that I can’t wait for autumn in Tromso as I’m already looking forward to experiencing all these things all over again!

     

    Arctic Cathedral during Polar Night

     

    And if you consider visiting the city one day, here are a few reasons why autumn is the perfect time:

    1. First of all, the cruise ship season is over so the city is way less crowded and it’ll be easier to find accommodation and space in the museums.

    2. The snow hasn’t arrived yet which means you can go hiking on trails that are inaccessible during winter time. Plus, I don’t need to tell you how beautiful a forest is in autumn, right? That combined with snow-covered mountains in the distance makes for some beautiful pictures!

    3. If you’re arriving in early autumn, you might still have a chance to see some reindeer before they embark on their journey to their winter pastures. There aren’t any reindeers on Tromso island but on the neighbouring whale island, Kvaloya, you can almost always spot a reindeer or two from spring to late summer.

     

    Tromso Island in Autumn

     

    4. With the midnight sun disappearing and nights finally becoming dark, you can see the Northern Lights again! And in autumn that means, you can wait for them outside without almost freezing to death. Plus, Tromso looks really pretty at night and especially the Arctic Cathedral makes for a nice picture in the dark.

    5. If you’re lucky and at the right place at the right time, you can experience the first snow of the season. Usually, people complain that it’s too early but personally, I prefer snow over rainy and slippery streets. And that feeling of seeing the first snow of the winter is just undescribable, mainly because you never know when it’s finally time. Two years ago, the first snow only arrived in mid-October whereas last year it happened already in late September. I’m so curious to see when it’ll happen this year!

    Can you see why autumn is a magical time in Tromso now? It’s the time of many firsts and lasts and I’m looking forward to the first snow and Northern Lights as much as to the last hikes in the woods and the last reindeer sightings of the season.

     

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    If you want to read more about Tromso and my life in Arctic Norway, head on over to Snow in Tromso and leave a comment below telling me what the best season is in your favourite Northern town!

    Vanessa

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    LIAF – Norway

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 14th August 2015
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    Lofoten International Art Festival takes place in the municipality of Vågan in the Lofoten archipelago – August 28 – September 27. LIAF is a festival for contemporary art taking place in Lofoten a cluster of islands located on the North West Coast of Norway, just above the Arctic Circle, every second year. The festival was first […]




    Lofoten International Art Festival takes place in the municipality of Vågan in the Lofoten archipelago – August 28 – September 27.

    LIAF is a festival for contemporary art taking place in Lofoten a cluster of islands located on the North West Coast of Norway, just above the Arctic Circle, every second year. The festival was first initiated in 1991, as a local art exhibition with a broad range of expressions and with a regional profile. From 1999, the festival was given an international profile changing the name to Lofoten International Art Festival, and since 2009, the festival has been run by The North Norwegian Art Center (NNKS) and LIAF’s artistic advisory board.

     

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    LIAF presents works by international artists in a local and site-specific context and seeks to be an open, experimental and including meeting place for artists, audience and locals. LIAF acknowledges the complexity of place and seeks to be a discursive, engaged and social platform for different positions creating a dialogue between the local and global. The prospect of developing and discovering new knowledge and understanding through art is the core of the festival. LIAF is not connected to a permanent location or space, but is invented anew every time by infiltrating and moving into already existing structures: Everything from a garage, a library, a shed, a bunker, a fish drying rack, a private house, a shop or an old warehouse. New curators also develop the festival every time, with diverse backgrounds, ideas and practices and in different ways bringing the familiar and unfamiliar together. By insisting on this open and experimental approach, we believe LIAF can be a place for exchange and involvement on multitude levels, every time revealing new things about our world and ourselves.

     

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    LIAF has taken place eight times since 1999 presenting artists like Gillian Wearing, Lawrence Weiner, AK Dolven, Ken Lum, Olafur Eliasson, Mari Slaattelid, Elmgren & Dragseth, Gardar Eide Einarsson, Pipilotti Rist, Geir Tore Holm, Eija Liisa Athila, Jesper Just, Amar Kanwar, Tori Wrånes, Michel Auder, Kjersti Andvig, John Giorno, Lene Berg, Lindsay Seers, David Horvitz, Mahmoud Khaled, HC Gilje, Karl Larsson, Shilpa Gupta, István Csácány, Lisa Tan and many more.

     

    Markus_Selg

    Markus Selg

     

    LIAF curators have been Tor Inge Kveum, Per Gunnar Tverbakk, Vibeke Sjøvoll, Gry Ulrichsen, Göran Christenson, Maaretta Jaukkuri, Taru Elfving, Richard Borgström, Helga-Marie Nordby, Thora Dolven Balke, Linn Pedersen, Anne Szefer Karlsen, Bassam El Baroni and Eva González-Sancho.

     

    Kjell Ove Storvik-LIAF 2013-9054

    Kjell Ove Storvik

     

    Disappearing Acts 2015

    Titled Disappearing Acts, LIAF 2015 will take its thematic basis on ideas of human agency disappearing through the processes of history, ecology, and technology. This approach is informed by the context of the Lofoten Islands, with its precarious economic-environmental dependency, its highly marketable “screensaver” scenery, and its cultural legacy of self-sufficiency and retreat from the antagonism of the urbanised world. Organised as a large-scale group exhibition, Disappearing Acts will feature 25–30 international artists, with many works commissioned especially for LIAF 2015. The exhibition will also be accompanied by a full public programme and publication.

     

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    Venue

    The “Jern & Bygg” premises in Svolvær serves as the main venue for LIAF 2015. Jern & Bygg was a family-owned hardware store and furniture outlet that operated continuously from 1948 to 2010. The business developed through the decades and new sections were repeatedly added to the original building. When it closed in 2010, it had expanded to a scale of 3,500 square meters across several floors. The history of the premises runs parallel to the post-war history of Norway and Lofoten, from the expansive rebuilding after WWII, the rise of Social Democracy, the re-creation of Norway as a petrostate in the ’70s, the discontinuation of industrial production, monopolization of the fishing industry and subsequently the gentrification and touristification of the new millennium. The building is now the last example of pragmatic waterfront architecture in Svolvær. After LIAF 2015, the building will be demolished.

    The North Norwegian Art Center (NNKS) is a juncture institution for Northern Norway responsible for presenting contemporary art and arts and crafts. NNKS is an artist-run institution owned by The North-Norwegian Visual Artist Association (NNBK) and The North Norwegian Craft Association (NKNN).

     

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    Curators for 2015

    Matt Packer is a curator and writer currently based in Northern Ireland. He is Director of CCA (Centre for Contemporary Art) in Derry~Londonderry, and an Associate Director of Treignac Projet in France. Packer says he is delighted to have the opportunity to co-curate LIAF 2015: What makes LIAF so unique is not only the spectacular scenery and sociability of the Lofoten Islands but also its remarkable history of developing artistic dialogues that extend outwardly from Lofoten and into other arenas. As a festival, it has a restless ambition to think through new models of curatorial approach at a time when the formula for larger-scale biennale-type contemporary art events seems ever more standardized. As such, I’d like to think that curating LIAF 2015 will not only be a conversation about art and artists but a conversational experiment in public practice.

     

     

    Arne Skaug Olsen is a curator, art critic and writer based in Bergen in Norway. He is a regular contributor to Nordic online web journal for art criticism, kunstkritikk.no, and has published writings in Camera Austria, Klasskampen, Billedkunst and Kunstjournalen B-Post, among others. Skaug Olsen is also excited: It is an honor to be trusted with the task of co-curating the next LIAF, one of the most important recurring art events in Norway. I have followed the biennale closely, and on two occasions been part of the LIAF crew, in different capacities. It´s a privilege to now be a part of the festivals history, and to shape it´s future. Lofoten is truly a unique place, especially because of all the open minded and welcoming people in the region, but also because their outspokenness and their interest in art and culture. Conversations in Lofoten are never dull, and I´m looking forward to participate in the ongoing dialogue with the people of Lofoten about what role art and artist should play in their community, and beyond.

     

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    Featured Artists

     

    Anna Ådahl (b.1973 in Stockholm, Sweden, lives and works in Stockholm and London, UK) studied at Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux Arts de Paris, France. Her works spans performance, film and installation. Ådahl’s work has been presented at Taiga Space, St. Petersburg, Russia (2014); Botkyrka Konsthall, Stockholm (2013); WELD, Stockholm (2013); FRAC Champagne-Ardenne, Reims, France (2013); Palais de Tokyo, Paris, France (2012); Centrum för Fotografi, Stockholm (2009); and Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennal, Niigata-Ken, Japan (2006).

     

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    Roderick Hietbrink (b.1975 in Gorssel, the Netherlands, lives and works in Oslo, Norway and Amsterdam, the Netherlands) holds a MFA from Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam. Hietbrink’s work span video installation, film, performance, objects and photography, investigating aspects of the psychology and inherent conflicts between the rational and instinctive self. His work has been exhibited at Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Centre Pompidou, Paris, France; De Appel, Amsterdam; Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam; Artspace Visual Art Centre, Sydney, Australia; and the 5th Moscow Biennale, Russia.

     

    Roderick Hietbrink_Fear, Anger, Sadness, Joy

     

    Sam Basu (b.1967 in London, UK, lives and works in Treignac, France) is the Director of Treignac Projet, an exhibition and workshop project established in 2007 together with Liz Murray. Sam Basu works predominantly with sculptural installation and architectural-research projects, with a particular interest in the relationship between esoteric and activist approaches to counter-culturalism. He often works in collaboration with other artists, including Shahin Afrassiabi, Francis Upritchard, and Matt Bryans. Basu’s work has been presented at Glucksman Gallery, Cork, Ireland; Camden Arts Centre, London; and Laing Gallery, Newcastle, UK.

     

    The Actual Possibility of Escape

     

    Jon Benjamin Tallerås (b. 1984 in Oslo, Norway, lives and works in Oslo) graduated from the Oslo National Academy of the Arts in 2011. His work spans different media, including photography, video, sculpture, performance, text and installation. Tallerås investigates urban space, exploring hidden and often non-used areas of the city. His sculptures are often made out of found materials. Tallerås is one of the co-founders and curators of the project space One Night Only. He has exhibited his work at Akershus Kunstsenter, Lillestrøm, Norway (2014); Kunsthall Oslo (2014); Oslo Kunstforening, Oslo (2013); Gallery BOA, Oslo (2013); and NoPlace, Oslo (2011).

     

    Experiments, Propositions, Decay and Deterieration (2015)_3

     

    Steinar Haga Kristensen (b.1980 in Oslo, Norway, lives and works in Oslo) studied at the Oslo National Academy of the Arts, Akademie der Bildenden Künste, Vienna and at Sydney College of Art. Haga Kristensen’s work seeks to unveil the positive lingual potentiality inherent in the exuberant modernity. He often stages theatricalised spectatorship and mannerist sculptural repetition. He is one of the founding members of the artist group D.O.R. Haga Kristensen has presented his work at WIELS Contemporary Art Centre, Brussels; Etablissement d’en face projects, Brussels; Kunsthall Oslo; Gallery Rod Bianco, Oslo; The Danish Pavilion at the 54th International Art Biennial in Venice; Witte de With, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Dortmund Bodega, Oslo; Gallery Niklas Belenius, Stockholm, Sweden; Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde, Denmark and Young Artists’ Society (UKS), Oslo; and Bergen Kunsthall, Bergen, Norway.

     

    The Loneliness of the Index Finger (Part II)

     

    www.liaf.no

    www.nnks.no

    Photos supplied by LIAF.

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    SALT – A culture explosion in Norway

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 12th August 2015
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    Nordophile is proud to present SALT, an extensive and varied programme of art and culture throughout August, with an all Norwegian list of artists.     The artists Edvine Larssen, HC Gilje and Caroline Bergvall will each present a commissioned art installation on the beach. You can experience  Jenny Hval, Mari Boine and Bjørn Eidsvåg play concerts in breathtaking […]




    Nordophile is proud to present SALT, an extensive and varied programme of art and culture throughout August, with an all Norwegian list of artists.

     

    IMG_8487-Marte_Antonsen-1024x576

     

    The artists Edvine Larssen, HC Gilje and Caroline Bergvall will each present a commissioned art installation on the beach. You can experience  Jenny Hval, Mari Boine and Bjørn Eidsvåg play concerts in breathtaking surroundings, and let yourself be seduced by the DJ concept Solitude Sessions. SALT introduces a series of concerts with young Norwegian talents. They will give intimate solo concerts in the atmospheric Cafe Naustet and Agora; Marthe como el planeta, Ingeborg Oktober, Nagel and Sophie Kvam, Fredrik William Olsen, Morten Myklebust and Psyence Fiction.

    Every Saturday there will be sauna in one of the world’s largest saunas with panoramic view!

     

    Agora

    Marte Antonsen

    For thousands of years people have followed the movement of animals and the seasonal rhythms in the Arctic landscape. Footprints are few. SALT is inspired by and moves in that same Arctic landscape with care and respect“.

    SALT begins its journey on an Arctic beach on the mountainous island Sandhornøy. Sandhornøy is in Gildeskål municipality in Northern Norway, just south of Bodø. SALT opened in August 2014 and will stay at Sandhornøy until 2016. Over the coming years, SALT will travel across the northernmost part of our planet, making a home in Greenland, Iceland, the Faroe Islands, Ireland, Scotland, Spitsbergen, Alaska and Russia.

    SALT consists of several structures taking their form from the fiskehjelle (fish rack), a strong symbol of the livelihoods of the people of the north. Within these simple and portable structures, the audience is invited in to experience extraordinary art projects, concerts, theatre, readings and local food cultures.

    The world is watching the Arctic. It is estimated to hold more than twenty percent of the world’s currently unexploited oil reserves; it is the home of many of the world’s most vulnerable environments. Climate change is increasingly visible, the rate of change exceeding that of any other part of the world. What will happen as ever larger areas become ice-free, with nations and global corporations pushing for the extraction of oil and minerals?

     

    Salt-åpning-0142

    Martn Losvik

    Mankind has inhabited the Arctic landscape for ten thousand years. Arctic nomads wandered with the ice, taking advantage of available resources from coastal areas and a mountainous countryside. Their concern for and close relationship to nature means that archaeologists are able to find few remnants of their culture. This is the essence of the Arctic indigenous people’s philosophy and the guideline for SALT’s eight year long journey, which will be a cultural platform focusing on our common future, lifestyle and on environment and climate changes.

    Northern Norway has been the uninterrupted abode of more people than anywhere else in the Arctic region. This has been possible due to the abundance of fish at the outskirts of the Gulf Stream, as well as the inventiveness and stubbornness of its inhabitants. To endure long winters, all kinds of food preservation methods had to be invented. Two of the most successful were the salting and drying of fish on rocks (clipfish) and the drying of fish on fiskehjell constructions – the fish rack (stockfish). For thousands of years, such fish racks have been seen along the northern coast, on exposed headlands and small islands, where winds are strong and fish dries fast. Today, in many places, these are in the process of being torn down and forgotten.

     

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    Martn Losvik

    The fish rack has a form that reflects the coastal mountains. It has solid, strong poles that allow gusts of wind to slip through; it is a steep, slender and tall structure with an inherent Arctic flexibility; its lightness effectively enables it to be erected and taken down in a day in case people need to move along the coast. Since the poles float, they can also be dragged behind a boat when people look for new land, new seas and a new life. SALT has an equally flexible and fundamental function, albeit using art as the primary means of support.

     

    Featured artists

     

    Edvine Larssen

    For her new work at SALT Looking Close. Looking Far.Larssen will be in close dialogue with the people, history and places at Sandhornøy and the surrounding islands in Nordland over a period of one year. The first part of the work titled Pust is presented in the Pyramid, and offer a new way to navigate and experience the existing site at SALT. The installation was premiered Saturday 8 August, and involved a conversation on the artist’s next project Looking Close. Looking Far. with curator Helga-Marie Nordby og Edvine Larssen. Local people who would like to contact the artist are very welcome to email the artist: hedvine[a]gmail.com

    Entitled PUST (‘BREATH’ when translated to English), the work features a bright neon coloured textile installation, similar to the form of a curtain or large boat sail, which will cover one end of the largest of the wooden pyramid structures that is housed on the beach at SALT, acting as a highlight or marker in the landscape. The theatrical curtain, made from a transparent and lightweight fabric, will be visible from the sea and will live within the area’s striking scenery, evolving with the changeable weather conditions and moving with the wind and rain.

    At intervals during the project, the curtain will become a backdrop for the ongoing project Looking Close. Looking Far. and be raised up to mark the next stage of the project’s evolution.

    Since 2013 Larssen has been a Research fellow in the Norwegian Programme for artistic research at the Art Academy in Trondheim, NTNU with the project: Theatrical, but not theatre. Architectonic, but not architecture. Sculptural, but not sculpture. In this research project Larssen is using the Japanese concept [Ma], dealing with different layers of time and space, as a tool or method for creating art works in-between different fields. Her work for SALT is part of this research.

    Gunnar Holmstad
     
    HC GILJE is a Norwegian artist working with light, sound, architecture and space. SALT has commissioned Gilje to create a light motion installation for the fish rack structure, the Pyramid.

    Since 2006 Gilje has worked on a long-term project he has called Conversations with Spaces. It incorporates elements from his earlier practice: exploration of physical spaces in his videos, creation of spaces in his stage work and improvisation from his live work.

    This project explores, mainly through large-scale installations, perception of change and transformation in the meeting between the ephemeral media of light, projection, sound and motion with physical structures.

    Gilje aims to activate spaces and structures that are experienced through our bodies, seeing the body as the link between our mind and the physical world. He links perception of time and space to motion as it passes through spaces, objects, bodies and landscapes.

     
    Caroline Bergvall

    Caroline Bergvall is a French-Norwegian writer and artist working across media, languages and art-forms, based in London since 1989. Her projects alternate between installations, live performances, sound and audioworks, books and printed texts, as well as net-based pieces.

    On 23 August 2015, at 9am in the morning, Bergvall will present Watchman (68°12’N), a special time and site-specific performance at SALT, which invites the audience to call in the day as a communal experience.

    Watchman (68°12’N) is part of Bergvall’s ongoing work Raga Dawn, a sunrise vocal performance performed outdoors from the last hours of night until the very early morning during the Summer months, to accompany and celebrate the rising of day.

    From May – September 2016, Bergvall will perform Raga Dawn as a travelling trajectory at some 10 European sites of varying latitudes. The piece changes according to the length of the sunrise, from twilight to the first rays of the sun. The composition is an open and changing cycle of time-specific vocal and instrumental pieces, written for two voices (spoken and sung).

     

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    Photo Tom Martin

    Watchman (68°12’N) will be performed on the beach at SALT, from the very early hours of the morning until the sun reaches over the mountain and down to the beach. Celebrating the rise of day, the piece releases serenity and a spirit of hope, collective openness and amorous connectedness. It explores sounds and structures from mantra morning traditions to create vibratory connections between the two live voices and the very sparse frequency-based sound design. Passing birds’ songs, solar winds and meteoric showers are invited into the open composition.

    The title Watchman (68°12’N) is loosely inspired by the early medieval European morning poetry, the “alba”, in which secret passionate lovers are warned by the watchman, their accomplice, that dawn is calling in and that they soon need to separate.

    Here, the collective spirit of the performance also calls up the large rhythmic seasonal and diurnal patterns that re-connect beings to their bodies, to their surroundings.

    Artistic team:

    Lead artist: Caroline Bergvall
    Singing voice: Anouk Molendijk
    Sound design: David Scrufari
    Dramaturgy: Michèle Pralong

    carolinebergvall.com

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    Gunnar Holmstad

     

    Music programme

    SALT presents a series of concerts with young Norwegian talents. They will give intimate solo concerts in the atmospheric Cafe Naustet and Agora; Marthe como el planeta, Ingeborg Oktober, Nagel and Sophie Kvam, Fredrik William Olsen, Silje Hansen, Psyence fiction and Lamark.

     

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    Martin Losvik

    Outdoor stage – Gildehallen

    Experience Mari Boine and a family concert with Bjørn Eidsvåg. In Agora amphi, with a panoramic view to the beach, sea and sky, Jenny Hval will perform. SALT also introduces the concept “Solitude Sessions”.

     

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    Martin Losvik

    Every Saturday 10pm – 1am the outdoor stage Gildehallen, will hold different DJ’s all giving different interpretations of SALT and the beach which it is situated.

    The DJs are Snasen, DJ Strangefruit, Ådne Meisfjord (120Days/ Serena Maneesh) and DJ Karima.

    Head to Salted.no to find out more

    All photos provided by salted.no

    Featured image; Martin Losvik

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