GEST – Gothenburg English Studio Theatre

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 15th February 2016
  • Nordophile enjoys promoting the arts which come from all Nordic regions and bringing them to our English-speaking audience with a similar passion. So imagine our delight when we stumbled across a theatre group in Sweden which performs in English. This is certainly a must when heading over to Gothenburg for a cultural holiday! GEST – Gothenburg […]




    Nordophile enjoys promoting the arts which come from all Nordic regions and bringing them to our English-speaking audience with a similar passion. So imagine our delight when we stumbled across a theatre group in Sweden which performs in English. This is certainly a must when heading over to Gothenburg for a cultural holiday!

    GEST – Gothenburg English Studio Theatre is an award-winning English-speaking theatre located in Gothenburg, Sweden and is the only professional English-speaking theatre in western Sweden. We bring the very best of British contemporary drama in its original language to Sweden.

    GEST is run by Executive Artistic Director Kristina Brändén Whitaker and Co-Artistic Director Gary Whitaker. Actors are recruited in Britain before every production whilst a superb Swedish production team takes care of set and light design, music and administration.

     

    (Photo Lina Ikse taken from 2015 play YEN)

     

    It was founded in 2005 with the aim of providing quality, contemporary and award-winning theatre in the English language.

    GEST works with professional actors and directors from Britain and Sweden and aims to produce theatre of the highest standard, which is accessible to everyone. As well as performing in Sweden, GEST also performs internationally and are always keen to collaborate with theatres abroad. We also collaborate closely with schools, colleges and universities, offering specially reduced student prices, workshops and after-show discussions with the actors. (See Teachers’ page)

    Gothenburg has a large English-speaking population and is the home to a variety of nationalities where English is the second language. GEST also seeks to cater for these people, who may long for an enjoyable night at the theatre.

    At present nearly all the great English-speaking plays that are performed in Gothenburg are translated into Swedish. GEST are proud to be able to show the plays in the language that they were originally written.

     

    What’s on

     

    The Events

    Gothenburg English Studio Theatre presents the Swedish premiere of the award-winning and critically acclaimed play  The Events by David Greig. Music by John Browne. Directed by Gary Whitaker.

    8 April- 30 April at Gothenburg English Studio Theatre

    4 May – 14 May at Kulturhuset, Stadsteatern Stockholm

    (Photo: Lina Ikse)

     

    Featuring local choirs, The Events tells a story of obsession, grief and forgiveness

    Claire, a liberal church minister, runs a community choir in a small seaside town.
    “…a choir that brought together vulnerable people, old people, asylum seekers, immigrant men, young mums and so on – it was a – the idea was – you can imagine. ”

     Claire, a liberal church minister, runs a community choir in a small seaside town.
    ”…a choir that brought together vulnerable people, old people, asylum seekers, immigrant men, young mums and so on – it was a – the idea was – you can imagine.”

    One day a boy with a gun walks in during a choir rehearsal resulting in devastating consequences. Claire becomes obsessed with the boy and the reasons for his actions. She looks for answers among the politicians that the boy associates himself with, his father, old classmates and, in the end, the boy himself. It’s a journey that takes her to the edge of reason, science, politics and faith.

    The Events has a strong relevance to today’s development of far right extremism in Sweden and Europe whilst also exploring how far forgiveness can stretch in the face of brutality. Different local community choirs will join the cast on stage for each performance in this rare, daring and beautiful new play.

    To find out more about GEST and upcoming theatre productions head to GEST.se

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    Finnish artist & photographer – Milla Koivisto

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 5th February 2016
  • Kaikubanner

    Nordophile was very excited to come across Finnish artist & photographer, Milla Koivisto. Not purely just because of her breath-taking artistic view of the Nordic landscape but also because of her natural intensity when relating back to her audience her vision. Milla Koivisto is an artist, photographer and author from Finland. Her focus is on the […]




    Nordophile was very excited to come across Finnish artist & photographer, Milla Koivisto. Not purely just because of her breath-taking artistic view of the Nordic landscape but also because of her natural intensity when relating back to her audience her vision.

    Milla Koivisto is an artist, photographer and author from Finland. Her focus is on the natural world and our connections and relationship with it. Milla studied both illustration and visual communication at the Arts University of Bournemouth. She also studied classical flute and music theatre in Finland. She works with several artistic disciplines and her interest lies in narrative structures and storytelling. She currently divides her time between Finland and the UK.

     

    Kaiku

    We were keen to understand more about the Kaiku project from this Finnish artist and find out how this would translate to peak the interest of Nordophiles, with a certain attraction to the Nordic arts, in all genres.

    Kaiku is an audio-visual project, structured around a core narrative. Set in and inspired by the Nordic landscape of the Finnish archipelago, Kaiku tells the story of a reclusive Shaman, a flute playing girl called Aino and her echo Kaiku. The protagonists of the story face the harshness and the isolation brought by the landscape and each of their lives is a manifestation of learning and surviving by the stipulations of nature. Music and sound in the natural world become ways of connecting, coping and conveying feelings in the dialogue-less story of Kaiku.

    In the Kaiku project traditional storytelling is combined with modern narrative technique. The project combines words, images, recorded sound, compositions and video. The Kaiku project will be released in a series of exhibitions, events and talks during 2015-2017.

     

    The Kaiku Series

    The first short film in the Kaiku series, ‘The Old Woman’ is an exploration of solitude through sound and image and portrays the landscape of an old woman called Aino’s soul. The film was shot during a three month stay on a treeless lighthouse island of Bengtskär in the Baltic Sea in Finland.

     

     

    The Kaiku book

    The first part of the Kaiku project is an illustrated, fictional book. Set on a small island where the winter days are short and the summer sun never sets and life must adapt to the changing seasons. A vision of two women with the same face sets a reclusive shaman on a journey from his dark forest cabin to the barren, windswept shores of a lighthouse.

    In Kaiku our relationship with nature is explored through sounds and seasons. Set over the course of a year in the isolation of a small island Kaiku  is the result of a long-running fascination with traditional narrative, folklore and the natural environment.

     

    To order the book and find out more about Milla Koivisto head over to Millakoivisto.com

    Milla talks about the origins of the Kaiku project on her site which gives us an insight into her thought process and how the idea was born.

    “A story had been brewing in my mind for some time, not leaving me alone. On the last day of December 2012 I sat down at my desk in my apartment in Brighton and started to write. I have always been writing stories, but never been mature enough to sit still long enough to finish a longer piece. Writing a book is of course more then just an endurance sport -it is about finding a story you believe in, are passionate about and know is true. For me there was only one thing I could write about. I had to write about the sea and the island I grew up on. The project became a love letter to the landscape I knew. I was brought up on a small island called Kemiönsaari in the south coast of Finland, in the Baltic Sea. At the time I started writing Kaiku I had been living in the UK for seven years. I realised how little was written or known about the Finnish culture outside Finland. It became clear to me that the story needed to be written in English, so I added this on to my challenge and started writing in my third language.

    I started to write about an island, about a Shaman, a girl called Aino and her echo Kaiku. Kaiku in Finnish is both a name and the event of a sound caused by the reflection of sound waves from a surface back to the listener – an echo. What I wanted to portray in the story was the interconnection with the natural world and the people. It was important for me to show the integral connection between the people and their land. It also became a story about solitude, isolation and loneliness, themes I feel are close to the Finnish people through our characteristics, the geographical location of the country and perhaps even through the dissimilarity of our language compared to most other European languages.

     

     

    From the very beginning I wanted to create a whole world around the story of Kaiku. I wanted to not only to tell a story with words but also to make it come alive with sound and images. Kaiku became a multidisciplinary project structured around a core narrative. It is a project combining words, image, sound and music and video. So far the project has taken me to three small islands in Finland. In Summer 2014 I spent a month on the island of Kökar, in the Baltic Sea in Finland, living in the old post office that was converted in to an artist residence. My purpose was to compose and collect natural sounds for the project. I returned to the island in January 2015 to further compose and collect, this time the sound world of the Nordic winter. In summer of 2015 I divided my time living in Kemiönsaari and the small lighthouse island of Bengtskär at the Baltic Sea where I filmed and recorded natural sounds.

    Kaiku is an ongoing project which will be completed in 2017. The first part of the project, is a book titled Kaiku.”

    Contact Milla here

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    Njord Biennale – Colour of Sound

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 29th January 2016
  • Great news! After a very long Christmas break, Nordophile is back for 2016 and will continue to introduce to Nordophiles many different Nordic talents. But we aren’t the only ones who are are here! Last year in the summer we featured the up-and-coming Njord Biennale – Copenhagen Festival and in 2016 it’s arrived! From 28th January […]




    Great news! After a very long Christmas break, Nordophile is back for 2016 and will continue to introduce to Nordophiles many different Nordic talents.

    But we aren’t the only ones who are are here! Last year in the summer we featured the up-and-coming Njord Biennale – Copenhagen Festival and in 2016 it’s arrived!

    From 28th January to 1st February Copenhagen is going to explode with Colour & Sound from Nordic contemporary artists.

    “With a focus on timbre in music and color tones in the visual arts, the biennale brings together a number of cross cultured composers, visual artists, musicians, directors, etc. in Nordic collaboration on a number of cross artistic projects.”

     

     

    Programme

     

    NJORD Biennale has a clear aim to focus on the interaction between the tonal colors of music and colour tones of visual art. To live up to this aim, we have gathered a group of composers, artists, musicians, and directors etc. to create cross-artistic projects with a common Nordic tone.

    The festival´s programme offers five nights of concerts and three exhibits that will unfold the vision of this year´s theme. The programme is broad in scope  – both the well known and established as well as the new generation of composers are represented in NJORD´s diverse selection. Concert formats and content varies; from grand opera productions over experimental ensemble concerts with visuals, to intimate solo and duo performances.

     

    Featured Artists

     

     

    photo; Maarit Kytöharju

     

    Aliisa Neige Barrière (b. 1995) was born into a French-Finnish family in Paris, where her music studies have included violin, piano, chamber music and choral as well as orchestral conducting.

    The passionate chamber musician has participated in projects and master classes throughout Europe and America, and moving musical from the Baroque to the latest music.

    In Denmark Aliisa Neige Barrière helped to create the new Hindsgavl Nordic Chamber Orchestra and has participated in chamber music festival Open Strings.

    In the year 2011-2012 she studied violin with Renee Jolles in New York at the Preparatory Division of Mannes College of Music, as well as orchestral conducting and chamber music. As a winner of the Concerto Competition she played the first movement of the Khachaturian Concerto in March 2012 at Symphony Space, New York.

    After having received her Performance Diploma at the Conservatoire à Rayonnement Régional, she returned to New York in 2013 where she was awarded a full scholarship for four years of studies at Mannes College of Music, where she studied for 2 years with Lewis Kaplan and Laurie Smukler (violin), Michael Adelson and David Hayes (conducting) playing also in the Mannes Baroque Players under the direction of Nancy Wilson.

    As a passionate chamber musician, Barrière has participated in a great variety of projects and masterclasses throughout Europe and the United States, and is interested in all music from baroque to contemporary.

    Her recent engagements have included solo, conducting and chamber music appearances. She most recently conducted Stravinky’s L’Histoire du Soldat at Mannes College and is also a founding member of the new Hindsgavl Nordic Chamber Orchestra in Denmark and has participated in the Open Strings Chamber Music Festival both as a performer and in assisting in artistic programming.

    Since her move to Norway, her projects have included taking part in the celebration of the 80th birthday of pianist Liv Glaser in an all Mozart program on period instruments, under the direction of Bjarte Eike, and also producing and leading a special project, For Peace We Stand meant to unite musicians against barbary in the world.

    Aliisa Neige Barrière plays a 1717 violin by Claude Pierray.

     

    Avanti! Photo: Marco Borggreve
    Avanti! Photo: Marco Borggreve

     

    Finnish Avanti! Chamber Orchestra is a quite extraordinary artistic powerhouse! The ensemble was founded in 1983 on the initiative of Esa-Pekka Salonen, Olli Pohjola and Jukka-Pekka Saraste, and since 1998 clarinettist Kari Kriikku has been artistic director.

    Today Avanti! is renowned as one of the best ensembles for new music in the world. The ensemble specializes in no particular genre; rather, it is proud to be a specialist in all styles with a strong sense of responsibility for the music of today.

    Avanti! works in close partnership with front-line international conductors, soloists and composers, and has won many prizes and widespread acclaim from audiences and critics all over the world.

    The concerts at NJORD Biennale 2016 are the first time ever Avanti! Chamber Orchestra will perform in Denmark.

     

    photo; Nikolaj Lund

    photo; Nikolaj Lund

     

    Bjarke Mogensen (b.1985) This Danish accordionist at the age of 13 made his debut as a soloist in a German TV broadcast with the Munich Symphony Orchestra.

    In 2011, Bjarke Mogensen had his solo debut at Carnegie Hall, New York, and in 2012 he received 1st prize in the prestigious European Broadcast Unions “New Talent” competition in Bratislava.

    Bjarke Mogensen studied at the Royal Danish Academy of Music as a pupil of Geir Draugsvoll and today he teaches chamber music at the same place.

    He has given solo concerts all over the world from New York to Moscow, from Iceland to Turkey. He has performed chamber music with violinists Augustin Dumay and Gidon Kremer and cellist Andreas Brantelid. As a soloist he has worked with orchestras such as the Moscow Virtuosi, Kremerata Baltica, Slovak State Philharmonic Orchestra, The Tiroler Symphony Orchestra, the Danish National Symphony Orchestra and the Copenhagen Philharmonic, conducted by maestros such as John Storgårds, Francesco Angelico, Rafael Payare, Lan Shui, Rolf Gupta, Leos Svarovský, Beat Furrer and Vladimir Spivakov.

    A long succession of collaborations with prominent living composers has resulted in many new compositions – concertos, chamber music and solo works – dedicated to Bjarke Mogensen.

    Bjarke Mogensen’s repertoire is almost unlimited, with a span ranging from folk music and accordion classics over his own arrangements and transcriptions to brand new works for accordion.

     

    asa_gudjonsdottir_photo_guðmundur_ingo-lfsson (1)

    photo; Guðmundur Ingólfsson

     

    Asa Gudjonsdottir from Reykjavik, Iceland, came into a family devoted to the arts. Beginning her studies at the age of 3, and instantly became mesmerized with the instrument. At the age of 12, Asa was admitted to the Reykjavik Conservatory, ultimately leading up to her acceptance at the prestigious Icelandic Academy of the Arts where she studied with Auður Hafsteinsdottir. Asa has cultivated her talent with wonderful musicians, of which includes Routa Kroumovitch at Stetson University, Boris Kuschnir, in Vienna, and Anton Miller at the Hartt School of Music where she graduated with Masters in violin performance.

    Asa regularly performs in concerts and music festivals in Europe and United States, as a soloist and as a chamber musician. Her recent performances have included appearances at Scandinavia House in New York, Lincoln Center in New York, Icelandic embassy in Berlin and Washington D.C. She is a recipient of the Visa cultural award in Iceland, Fulbright Foundation and the American-Scandinavian Foundation.

    Asa’s latest concerts feature performances at the contemporary music festival, “Dark Music Days” in Reykjavik, Iceland, the “Mostly Nordic Concert Series” in Seattle in May with her duo, the Amaranth Duo, Mendelsohn Violin Concerto with the Icelandic Youth Orchestra and a premiere of Depo Flux, concerto grosso by Ken Steen at Lincoln Theater in Connecticut.

     

    jakob_kullberg_foto_charlotta_miranda

    photo; Charlotta Miranda

     

    Jakob Kullberg has been praised internationally for his performances of the modern cello concerto,  living in Paris, he is one of the most active and diverse young Danish instrumentalists.

    Jakob studied in a.o. Amsterdam, London, Zagreb, Vienna and Copenhagen, with Harro Ruijsenaars, Dmitri Ferschtman, Valter Despalj, Mats Lidström, Morten Zeuthen and Anner Bylsma.

    Top prize winner at international solo and chamber music competitions, twice winner of the Danish Grammy, most recently in 2013 for his concerto CD ’Momentum’ which was also nominated for the coveted Gramophone Award in London and chosen for ’Album of the Week’ with Q2 Music, New York.

    In 2011 he was awarded the ’Gladsaxe Music Prize’ and has been artist in residence for, amongst others, the Tivoli Garden Concert Hall, the International Carl Nielsen Violin Competition and New Music Orchestra, Poland.

    Jakob’s recent debut with The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra in London as well as with Ensemble Intercontemporain at one of their inter-sessions in Paris received excellent reviews, and he looks forward to concerto debuts with the Bergen Philharmonic and the BBC Philharmonic Orchestras. He is scheduled to record Per Nørgård’s Remembering Child with Sinfonia Varsovia in December 2014. In the 2016/17 seasons he will embark on a two-CD recording project with the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by John Storgårds comprising concertos by Saariaho and Nørgård as well as the two cello concertos by Shostakovich.

    He has returned frequently to prestigious international festivals such as the Aldeburgh Festival, the Warsaw Autumn Festival, the Huddersfield Festival and Bergen International Festival.

    Jakob enjoys a unique working relationship with the Danish composer Per Nørgård, who has composed and dedicated numerous works for him; the two have developed a rare dialogical collaboration in which the composer utilises the creative potential of the cellist in an experimental composition process. He is also a notable interpreter of the work of Bent Sørensen and in 2011 he moved to Paris to focus on his collaboration with Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho.

    As a teacher Jakob has garnered attention giving masterclass internationally at for instance, the Royal Academy of Music in London, the Norwegian Academy of Music and the Karol Szymanowski Academy of Music in Poland, and has held a teaching position at the Royal Danish Academy of Music since 2005.

    In 2013, he was appointed to the Norwegian Artistic Research Fellowship Programme and has been the artistic director of the Open Strings Cello Academy since 2004.

    For more information and other featured artists head over to njordbiennale.com

     

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    ‘What’s On’ SATC NYC

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 1st October 2015
  • Nordophile has been keeping in touch with our friends at the Scandinavian American Theater Company based in New York and wanted to share with you some very important upcoming events which are very much keeping Nordic theatre alive!   Kwasi Osei and Zenzele Cooper from SATC’s Off-Broadway production “Bastards of Strindberg”, photographer Kait Ebinger   […]




    Nordophile has been keeping in touch with our friends at the Scandinavian American Theater Company based in New York and wanted to share with you some very important upcoming events which are very much keeping Nordic theatre alive!

     

    Kwasi Osei and Zenzele Cooper from SATC’s Off-Broadway production “Bastards of Strindberg”, photographer Kait Ebinger

     

    Firstly, we spoke with one of the actors, Christiane Seidel (from Boardwalk Empire) and found out from her what it is like to be part of not only SATC in New York but the Nordic community as well.

     

    Photo credit Christopher St. George.

     

    How did you first become involved with SATC?

    As a half-Dane, I had excitedly been following SATC for a while and was quite impressed with their consistent body of work, especially since the company had only been around for a couple of years. While I was shooting Boardwalk Empire, our casting director Meredith Tucker had asked me if I could recommend any Norwegian men for a role she was casting. I reached out to Albert Bendix, SATC’s Co-Artistic Director and a fellow Dane, to see if he had any suggestions and we ended up meeting for coffee. We hit it off, kept in touch and this spring SATC reached out to me if I was interested in possibly becoming a member. Because this company doesn’t mess around, I even had to come in for an interview (a very nice one with coffee and Scandinavian cookies) with the entire company. Albert even skyped in from Denmark as he was on tour. Somehow I was able to prove myself worthy and now I’m responsible for Audience and Press Coordination.

     

    Have you seen an equal interest by both the Nordic and New York audience?

    Absolutely. SATC has a large audience following our productions, our SATContemporary Reading Series, and on our social media. For example, we have approximately 80-100 audience members per reading and that includes all ages of Scandinavians, Americans with Scandinavian roots, and Americans with an interest in new Nordic theater and contemporary culture.

     

    Rikke Lylloff and Albert Bendix from SATC’s Off-Broadway production “Bastards of Strindberg”, photographer Kait Ebinger

     

    Nordic eateries are popping up all over New York and the attendance to exhibitions by Nordic artists is high. Do you feel Nordic drama productions is on the same level of acceptance?

    There is definitely a surge in interest in all things Nordic. Especially, since Scandinavian tv shows like The Killing, The Bridge, or Borgen as well as Scandinavian literature have become widely popular (in their original or their US remakes) and Scandinavian actors like Mads Mikkelsen, Joel Kinnaman, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau or Birgitte Hjort Sørensen are being cast on American tv shows and films. We can feel that this definitely has an effect on the interest in what Scandinavian storytelling looks like on stage. Especially, when we’re inviting some of these actors to join us for readings. However, contemporary Scandinavian plays and playwrights are still relatively unknown stateside. So with SATC we’re in an exciting position to be able to bring these plays to New York for the first time. In a sense we’re educating the New York audiences about their existence while filling that increasing interest in Scandinavian culture. There are so many edgy, interesting, and widely different plays that are a cultural representation of what Scandinavia is today. I might be biased, but I definitely feel that we’re approaching the same level of acceptance very fast.

     

    Finally, you are performing a couple of  readings for SATC, can you tell us a bit about what we can expect.

    Our audience is definitely in for a fun (and free!) evening. We’ll have wine, guest actors and we’ll have up-and-coming playwright Marius Leknes Snekkevåg flying in from Norway. Our readings always take place at the beautiful Scandinavia House on Park Avenue. We’ll be presenting two short plays from Marius – one dramatic and one comedic. There’ll be a short Q&A with everyone and usually, we go out for drinks at a nearby bar, which is fun as we get a chance to chat with our audience. Personally, I’m extra excited as this will be my first time performing for SATC.

     

    Readings by

    Marius Leknes Snekkevåg (playwright, reading #1 on Oct 5, Norwegian plays)

    Courtesy of SATC

    Christiane Seidel (actress, reading #1 on Oct 5, Norwegian plays). www.christianeseidel.com

     

    Tomas Lagermand Lundme (playwright, reading #2 on Nov 9, Danish play “The Sauna”).

    Courtesy of SATC

    What’s On

    We’ll be kicking off our upcoming season with a new concept called “Shows in Development”. Here we invite audiences to follow and experience our process of creating an off-Broadway production at an early stage to give our audience the opportunity to ask questions and bring their thoughts to the table. The first show in development is titled “The Remember Me Project” and our first audience interaction will be on Sept 21, 2015 at 7:30pm with a pre-reception at 7:00pm. The play we’re working on is titled “Remember Me” (original title “Muista minut”) by Finnish writer Minna Nurmelin.

    We’re also continuing with our popular SATContemporary Reading Series. This is the sixth season of the series where we present five staged readings – one from each of the Nordic countries Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. The readings are one-night-only events, free to the public.

    The first reading will be on Oct 5, 2015 presenting two plays by the Norwegian playwright Marius Leknes Snekkevåg: “I Love You, Let Me Go” and “We Are The Voice of Our People”.

    The second reading will be on Nov 9, 2015 introducing Danish playwright Tomas Lagermand Lundme and his play “The Sauna”. For this reading, we’ll also have a guest star (TBA) joining us.

    The dates for the remaining readings are Jan 25, 2016, Feb 29, 2016, and May 2, 2016. We’re currently in the process of deciding on the individual plays.

    All our readings and “Show in Development” projects take place at Scandinavia House (http://www.scandinaviahouse.org/ at 58 Park Avenue, 10016 NYC) at 7:30pm with a 7:00pm pre-reception.

    In 2016, we’ll present the US-premiere of Norwegian playwright Arne Lygre’s play “Then Silence” as an Off-Broadway production.

    Head over to satcnyc.org to find out more
    Featured image Full cast from SATC’s Off-Broadway production “Bastards of Strindberg”, photographer Kait Ebinger
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    Nordophile attends Norwegian Night in Utrecht

  • Guest
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  • 29th September 2015
  • A Nordic fairytale in…Utrecht? As a Dutch copywriter – editor – journalist I don’t usually write in English, but when Nordophile’s Sarah Surgey – whom I ‘met’ on Instagram – asked me to cover the Nordic Delight Festival in my hometown Utrecht I thought: why not give it a try! The undiscovered culture of Northern […]




    A Nordic fairytale in…Utrecht?

    As a Dutch copywriter – editor – journalist I don’t usually write in English, but when Nordophile’s Sarah Surgey – whom I ‘met’ on Instagram – asked me to cover the Nordic Delight Festival in my hometown Utrecht I thought: why not give it a try! The undiscovered culture of Northern Europe brought to an innovating local music venue in the centre of a historical university town. It might be a positive new experience to a middle-aged guy (54) like me, normally covering city development and architecture. Well…I can tell you now, it was an experience more than worthwhile.

    Utsolgt’

     

     

    Not only did the unexpected request from Nordophile’s Sarah Surgey to cover the Nordic Delight Festival trigger my interest, I was also intrigued as to the fact that the festival at first did not get any attention in what’s called ‘Uitagenda Utrecht’, which claims to give full insight in cultural events across the city. Woud this affect the success of this relatively small festival, still unknown to many? Probably not, with around 300 visitors the 2014 edition in EKKO was ‘utsolgt’, Norwegian for sold out! Not a mainstream festival, Nordic Delight isn’t the first that brings high-caliber performers to the picturesque city of Utrecht. Until recently it was Summer Darkness that turned Utrecht gothic-black in a more than special gathering of spirits once every year since 2003. And November this year it’s Le Guess Who? that again welcomes international upcoming bands and artists as well as international visitors. The initiative for a Nordic Delight Festival in Utrecht started in 2013. Founding fathers Arne Dee and Ad Pontier successfully organized two festivals and several events in Utrecht since then, always focused on Scandinavian music and culture. This September 26 Nordic Delight again offered a chance to experience the most talented upcoming music acts, from Norway this time, for the first time in the Netherlands.

     

    DSC_7247

     

    Getting tuned

    Not being much of a Nordophile myself the complete line up was unknown to me. Live performances by Fay Wildhagen, Emilie Nicolas and Bloody Beach, names that did not ring any bells to me. Then again, set to play their first shows in the Netherlands it would probably also be a first acquaintance to many. I decided to check them out before visiting the festival and doing so l had to adjust all of my (somewhat mainstream) musicality to tune into the styles of music they represented. In that way, and perhaps in many ways, covering Nordic Delight promised to be like discovering an entirely new world. Seeing some YouTube vids of the young but already eccentric Emilie Nicolas for instance, made it clear to me that she could bewilder me even more performing live at our local music venue EKKO, famous for its widely renewing agenda. Nicolas’ enchanting, melancholy and sometimes ecstatic songs made one shiver inside. ‘Amazing work on sound, vocals, electro-pop arrangements and a great richness of colours, true emotion and sensibility’ someone strikingly defined her music. For instance ‘Psterio‘ from her 2014 debut album ‘Like I’m a warrior’ (released in the Netherlands June this year) brought Northern Europe straight into my living room the way only Volvo did before with their ‘Made by Sweden’ campaign.

     

     

    Different dimensions

    Besides prizewinning Nicolas, without any doubt the most famous act in the Nordic Delight line up, the other acts deserve some special attention as well. Fay Wildhagen, the young singer-songwriter and guitarist with her impressive band brings songs with an organic mix of folk, rock and other genres. Straight from the heart and with a wide range of emotions, from small and modest, melancholy at times (as in this beautiful song), too loud and extrovert. Not always easy listening but pure, intense and very vivid. Her promising debut album ‘Snow’ was recently released in the Netherlands. And then there’s the five-piece band Bloody Beach with their self-proclaimed ‘tropidelica’, a colourful and warm cocktail of rock, psychedelia, dub, afrobeat, disco, punk, reggae and pop. Awaiting their final breakthrough with the release of their second album next year, performing at Nordic Delight might warm us up for what’s to come. But it’s not only the main acts that draw attention. The program contains music, a wonderful selection of short films and a Norwegian dinner. So, hungry in many ways, I headed for EKKO on this Saturday night.

    Stunning and ecstatic

    There I was in the midst of a mostly young, alternative audience that at first seemed to be more in place. The atmosphere was relaxed and friendly and obviously everyone was curious for what the night would bring. None of us, however, seemed prepared for the impact of this evening. Where the sit down Norwegian dinner appeared to be reserved for other limited guests and was not open for all of the media, I arrived just before the stage opened at 20.00 hours. With the short films and musical performances programmed at the same time, for me it was more than logical to focus on music this evening and I’m glad I did. Almost traditional at times it was the stunning and sometimes ecstatic performance of the beautiful Emilie Nicolas and her impressive band that brought up a variety of emotions to probably every single visitor this night. What can one say about an overwhelming first acquaintance with this group of very modest young artists that in my opinion deserve a world stage. I’m convinced we’re gonna hear more of them soon…

     

     

    A warm embrace

    Also impressive was the first Dutch performance of the somewhat unordinary but charming Fay Wildhagen and band. Don’t ask me why, but to be honest, I was not expecting them to be as convincing as they were this evening. I was wrong there! Coming in from Hamburg/Germany, where she and Emilie Nicolas performed the night before at Reeperbahn Festival, Wildhagen rocked the house in many ways. Modest and fragile, folky at times and then up-tempo, loud and strong with a great sense of musicality and impressive guitar playing by Wildhagen herself. It felt like a warm embrace with this talented and promising young artist. And then, closing up Nordic Delight, there was Bloody Beach that finally made the audience move with their down to earth mix of music styles. In many ways a somewhat peace loving hippie style, dreamy rock perhaps, rather than the heavy metal appearance they seem to have. They did great on stage and knew how to take the house along with their infectious music.

    Catching up

    Looking back on the overwhelming experience that Nordic Delight was, it seems I’ve been missing out on the fast growing interest in Nordic culture. Working on this article, for instance, I discovered NordicVibes.com, a Dutch version of Nordophile.com which is, to my surprise, based in Utrecht. So without any doubt I’ve got some catching up to do and writing this article might be just the start of that!

    Maurice Hengevel Twitter 

    All photos credited to Wim Pontier

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    Norwegian/British band – Sun Up

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , , , 1 Comment
  • 24th September 2015
  • Nordophile is always on the lookout to bring you fresh Nordic music sounds which are creating ripples on the music scene. Occasionally known for its darker melancholy sounds running alongside with upbeat electronic pop, the acts coming out of the Nordics are certainly welcomed in countries fixated on the Nordic genre right now. We were […]




    Nordophile is always on the lookout to bring you fresh Nordic music sounds which are creating ripples on the music scene. Occasionally known for its darker melancholy sounds running alongside with upbeat electronic pop, the acts coming out of the Nordics are certainly welcomed in countries fixated on the Nordic genre right now.

    We were very excited to learn about a London/Norway mixed band called ‘Sun Up’ and wanted to find out more about this group whose track has been shared on Soundcloud this week.

    Listen to the ethereal dreamy voice from Frøydis Erås backed by upbeat pop music.

     

    Frøydis Erås – Voice
    John de Smet – Keys, Samples & Voice
    Maxim Fernandez – Guitar
    Howard de Smet – Bass
    Andrew Lusher – Drums, Samples & Voice

    If you tipped a scoop of Scandinavian snow, a handful of Hackney muck, and five friends in a blender, you’d get Sun Up, a new electro-speckled pop band hailing from Norway and London. Led by frontwoman Frøydis Erås, this five-piece uniquely weave together the introspective quirk of rural Scandinavia with the Technicolor clatter of metropolitan life.

    Sun Up’s first track ‘Machines’, a bedroom demo recorded and uploaded with minimal fanfare, immediately caught the attention of music tastemaker blogs such as Crack In The Road, Breaking More Waves and Gold Flake Paint.

    At their third ever gig, Sun Up were spotted by veteran booking agent Dave Chumbley at Primary Talent (Lana Del Rey, Alt-J, Wolf Alice) and spent the remainder of the year supporting the likes of Childhood, The Joy Formidable, and Phoria.

    Sun Up’s official debut track ‘Anchors’ is the crystallization of the band’s distinctive Anglo-Scandi DNA. Recorded during the pre-dawn hours of studio downtime by up-and-coming producer Neil Tollitt (Låpsley, Swim Deep, Pussy Riot), ‘Anchors’ is a glittering pop Trojan Horse hiding a bleak, broken heart.

    ‘Bursting with joy but tinged with something that sits between desire and the crushing weight of regret… understated brilliance’ – Gold Flake Paint

    ‘One of our new favourite voices… it took us just twenty-five seconds to fall in love’ – Breaking More Waves

    ‘Fantastic… Sun Up are well worth keeping an eye on’ – Crack In The Road

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    Tromso on a Budget

  • Guest
  • Tagged , , , , , 6 Comments
  • 21st September 2015
  • One of our guest bloggers here at Nordophile is back. Vanessa Brune made the move from Germany to Tromso in the Arctic of Norway. Whilst running her own site blogging about life in Tromso, Van also knows the true meaning of being a Nordophile and what Nordophiles want to see and do, so she has […]




    One of our guest bloggers here at Nordophile is back. Vanessa Brune made the move from Germany to Tromso in the Arctic of Norway. Whilst running her own site blogging about life in Tromso, Van also knows the true meaning of being a Nordophile and what Nordophiles want to see and do, so she has started guest writing for us with this in mind. Maybe one day you will make the move as well…….

     

     

    Tromso on a Budget – 10 Free Things to do on your visit

    Hello fellow Nordophiles! I’m so glad to be back again! In case you missed my last post about Tromso, my name is Vanessa and I’m a German expat living in Tromso in Arctic Norway. I blog about my life and travels in Scandinavia and the Arctic over at Snow in Tromso and am here today to spread a bit of my love for Arctic Norway!

    I’m currently a student and living in Norway isn’t exactly the cheapest thing to do. Neither is visiting so I completely understand your worries that visiting Tromso might be too expensive. Therefore, I’m here today to tell you: it is possible to visit the Arctic on a budget! Aside from looking out for cheap flights and booking a private room instead of a room at a hotel, there are a couple of things you can do and see in Tromso completely for free. Today I’m showing you the 10 best!

     

     

    Hunt the Northern Lights

    This is probably the best about Tromso: the Northern Lights. And yes, you can see them for free! Of course, there are Northern Lights tours for tourists which is great when the sky is cloudy and they drive you to less cloudy areas. However if the sky is clear, you’ll most likely see them in the middle of Tromso too! I can see them from my bedroom and I live in the city center! Although, if you want to take really nice pictures of the lights, you’d need to get away from the lights of the city. No problem though as Tromso Island is big and you can get outside of the city within a half hour walk.

     

     

    Experience the Midnight Sun

    Interested in more natural phenomena of the Arctic? If you visit Tromso during summertime, you’ll experience the Midnight Sun (aka 24 hours of daylight) included in your stay. It’s so nice to take a walk around the city centre in the middle of the night while it’s still bright outside.

     

    P1180163dz

     

    Go on a Hike

    Speaking of going on a walk, the Arctic nature can best be experienced outside of the city on a hike through the forests or in the mountains. There are so many hiking routes for you to choose from and all of them are clearly marked. My favourites: walking around Lake Prestvannet, hiking from the Northern tip of Tromso Island to the Southern tip or going up Mountain Storstein or Mountain Tromsdalstind on the mainland.

     

    The Southern Tip of Tromso Island

     

    Visit Perspektivet

    Tromso also has some culture for you to offer and some of it is even for free. Perspektivet, for example, is a photography museum with changing exhibitions – all of them for free!

     

    Perspektivet

     

    Visit the Northern Norway Art Museum & the Gallery of Contemporary Art

    If you’re interested in art, the Northern Norway Art Museum and the Gallery of Contemporary Art should be on your must-see list of places for your Tromso visit. Both are free of charge and both host wonderful Norwegian art you might not be able to see anywhere else.

     

    Gallery of Contemporary Art

     

    Get on board of the Hurtigruten

    Want to see what it’s like to cruise around on Norway’s coastal steamer? The Hurtigruten can be found at Tromso harbour every day from 2.30 to 6.30 pm and can be visited free of charge. You can have a look around the ship, drink coffee in the cafeteria and even use the whirlpool on deck while having a fabulous view on the Arctic Cathedral.

     

    Hurtigruten

     

    Have some Beach Time

    Yes, Tromso has a beach and even though it might not be warm enough to go for a swim during your visit, you should definitely head out to Telegrafbukta anyway. It’s such a beautiful place in the South of Tromso Island and the perfect place for an evening walk at the ocean!

     

    Telegrafbukta - the beach of Tromso

     

    Visit the Botanic Garden

    The Arctic-Alpine Botanical Garden in Tromso is showcasing plants from the world’s Arctic and Alpine regions, like the Himalaya and the Rocky Mountains, and is situated right below the University. To walk through the Gardens is free and should be on your list of things to do if you visit the city between May and October!

     

     

    See Reindeers and Polar Bears

    Tromso is in the Arctic so of course you’ll see reindeers and polar bears! Okay, the polar bear might only be a stuffed one at Mack Brewery but you can also see real reindeers near the University (in captivity) and over on Tromso’s neighbouring island Kvaloya (wild), besides seeing them all over the city centre for decorative purposes.

     

    Reindeer

     

    Take in the view of Tromso from above

    Tromso is such a beautiful place – and even more so if seen from above! The sight of Tromso Island, in the middle of the fjord between the mainland and the island Kvaloya is just so amazing! You can have this view after hiking up Mountain Storstein and as this might be a tough hike not exactly suitable for less well-trained people, you can always go for a much easier hike from the University to the ski jumping tower and look at the mainland and great parts of Tromso from that one. The views will be equally nice, promised!

     

    Tromso from above

     

    You see, Tromso might be in the Arctic and one of the most expensive countries of Europe, but it’s definitely possible to visit the city and see a lot while being on a budget!

    If you want to read more about Tromso and my life in Arctic Norway, head on over to Snow in Tromso and leave a comment below telling me what you’d like to do if you’d visit Tromso one day!

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    Season Scandinavia by Empty Deck

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
  • 17th September 2015
  • Nordophile was interested to learn more about a project on Kickstarter which caught our attention, with the two words Season Scandinavia. We spoke to the director Kay Michael, who has excited us even more, as this project will no doubt feed many Nordophile’s Nordic passion. The reasoning behind the venture from what we could see was […]




    Nordophile was interested to learn more about a project on Kickstarter which caught our attention, with the two words Season Scandinavia.

    We spoke to the director Kay Michael, who has excited us even more, as this project will no doubt feed many Nordophile’s Nordic passion.

    The reasoning behind the venture from what we could see was that Nordic film and TV drama accompanied with Nordic literature was now a firm favourite in most homes, but what was the next step? Even though there is no sign of the interest in Nordic drama both on screen and book form faltering, anytime soon, what if Scandinavian playwrights and their works were brought to our stages?

    Empty Deck presents the most exciting unknown contemporary Scandinavian plays in co-production with The Other Room Theatre, Cardiff.

    Empty Deck is a new theatre collective that collaborates with playwrights and artists from all over the world, bringing the best of international new writing to the UK stage for the first time.

     

     

    We may have spent too many nighttime hours watching The Killing or The Bridge, or immersed in the brooding novels of Karl Ove Knausgaard and Stieg Larsson… and we got thinking: Where’s the theatrical equivalent to all this Nordic Noir?

    Beyond Jon Fosse’s work, little is known of contemporary Scandinavian playwrights. Over the last 12 months Empty Deck has been developing Ibsen Award winner Arne Lygre’s Then Silence for its English-language world premiere, and that development has led us to discover other exciting, award-winning Scandinavian playwrights, both up-and-coming and established, whose work deserves a wider and English audience.

    Thanks to International Performing Rights Ltd and Theatre Colombine Agency we have now selected plays from Denmark, Sweden, and Norway that we shall be presenting readings of across three venues in Cardiff between October – November.

    COSMIC FEAR OR THE DAY BRAD PITT GOT PARANOIA

    By Christian Lollike The Other Room, Cardiff 

    October 30th, 19.30PM

     

     

    “The world is a goddamn hairs breadth away from falling apart. Everyone knows it. Everyone fucking knows it, but no one…no one is doing anything.”

    Cosmic Fear or The Day Brad Pitt Got Paranoia charts our growing concerns and paralysis over the impact of climate change on the planet. LA is filled with traffic jams under heavy smog, trees are drifting under floods in Bangladesh and in China incinerators are burning holes in the ozone layer. Brad Pitt fears the future. Brad is a man of action and he’s not here to entertain but to make a difference. Brad embarks on the great universal love project: to Save Planet Earth

    Christian Lollike is an award-winning Danish director, adaptor and playwright educated at The Danish National School of Playwriting at Aarhus Theatre (1997 – 2001). He is one of the most performed Danish playwrights abroad and is known for his critical plays all written in an anti-naturalistic and open form. In 2009, he received a Reumert award as playwright of the year. 

    This play, by Danish Christian Lollike, grabbed our attention in particular and we’d like to do more than just a rehearsed reading of it. We’re asking for your support to enable one week’s Research & Development and performance sharing of this play during our residency at The Other Room, Cardiff’s pub theatre.

    Cosmic Fear is about three peoples’ paralysis in the face of climate change. Not knowing what to do they all imagine themselves to be Brad Pitt, using his status as Hollywood hero to make a blockbuster film campaigning for a new global consciousness of universal love, with the mission of saving Planet Earth.

    It’s silly. And it’s scary. But it is an ever-relevant play, which asks pertinent questions of our responsibility as individuals towards the care of the planet, humanity and the future. It reaches into our genuine concerns, fears, confusion, denial and anger about the devastating effects of climate change on the world.

     

                                                         Photography: Richard Davenport

     

    Collaboration is at the heart of what we do, and the team is only as good as the collaborators with whom we work.

    As part of our residency at The Other Room Theatre, all venue and marketing costs are covered. However we want to employ the most exciting Cardiff-based creatives to work with us for the week. To excavate the ongoing issues of climate change and look at how we can present this text through both theatrical and digital means, we want to engage:

    • 3 actors
    • One video designer 
    • One dramaturge 

    It’s important to us that artists are respected and paid properly for their hard work and creativity, in line with the Independent Theatre Council recommended rates of pay. Your support will enable us to do just that.

     

                                                         Photography: Ettiene Leung

     

    The Team

    Kay is a freelance theatre director, who trained at Drama Centre London and read English & Theatre Studies at Warwick University. She is a founding member of award-winning Curious Directive with whom she has devised, performed and directed. In 2014 she was Trainee Director at Paines Plough.

     

                                                         Photography: Hannah Lovell

     

    Fern has worked between Italy, Australia and Wales for the last 7 years. Most recently she worked at Wales Millennium Centre, Cardiff, on forming their strategic producing plan and new vision under their new artistic director.

     

     

    Born in Romania, Denisa’s training has included 5 years of Architecture and Design, 8 years of Drawing and Painting, 3 years of Sculpture and 6 years of Art History. At Central Saint Martins she developed her practice through both devised and design-led projects.

     

     

    Sara is a post-graduate of Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music & Dance and has collaborated with Kay since the early days of curious directive.

     

     

    Empty Deck

    Empty Deck is an international collective who tell stories that cross artistic forms and geographical borders.

    Collaborating with contemporary playwrights and artists from all over the world, we strive to make invigorating theatre that is physically bold, emotionally stirring, and relevant. We want to make work that is both local and global in its reach.
    Empty Deck aims to:
    • Deliver narratives that uncover experiences of the world that we live in now;
    • Challenge the relationship between the audience and spectacle, exploring the audience’s complicity within a shared space;
    • Interrogate the relationship between theatrical form and content in inventive, exciting and illuminating ways.Help us spread the word by posting our Kickstarter campaign on your facebook &/or twitter page and mention us on any social media platform you use.

    Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/emptydeck

    And follow us on Twitter:  https://twitter.com/emptydeckco

    Head to the Kickstarter page www.kickstarter.com

    Featured image by Richard Davenport

    Thank you to empty deck for text & use of photos

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    Nordic Film Days Lübeck

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , Leave a comment
  • 15th September 2015
  • Nordic Film Days Lübeck, first presented by the Lübeck Film Club in 1956 and taken over by the Hanseatic City of Lübeck in 1971, has one of the longest traditions of any film festival worldwide. It is the only festival in Germany, and the only one in Europe, which is entirely devoted to the presentation […]




    Nordic Film Days Lübeck, first presented by the Lübeck Film Club in 1956 and taken over by the Hanseatic City of Lübeck in 1971, has one of the longest traditions of any film festival worldwide. It is the only festival in Germany, and the only one in Europe, which is entirely devoted to the presentation of films from the North and Northeast of Europe.

    Feature films, documentaries and short films from Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Iceland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway and Sweden are presented at this five-day event every year at the beginning of November. In addition, there is an extensive children’s and youth film programme and a retrospective devoted to important eras, specific genres or famous persons of film history. The section Filmforum presents films from North Germany. Accompanying the film programme are seminars, discussions, roundtable talks, concerts and readings.

     

     

    The Nordic Film Days Lübeck is both an audience festival and an important meeting place for the film industry in Germany and northern Europe. Many directors whose debut works were presented in Lübeck have gone on to earn fame around the world – such as Bille August, Lasse Hallström, Aki Kaurismäki or Fridrik Thór Fridriksson.

    The film festival is put on by the Hanseatic City of Lübeck in cooperation with the Scandinavian film institutes and foundations as well as the corresponding film institutions in the Baltic countries. Patrons of the festival are the ambassadors of the Nordic countries in Germany. Honorary President is the Norwegian actress and film director Liv Ullmann. Media partners are the television and radio broadcaster Norddeutscher Rundfunk (NDR) and daily newspaper Lübecker Nachrichten.

    The 2015 official programme will be released early October, but here are some of the previous years winners for you to find some Nordic Films to keep you going until then!

     

    Previous Winners

    The NDR Film Prize for Best Feature Film.

    Endowed with 12,500 euros this prize has been awarded annually since 1990 for a “feature film of special artistic quality.” The film should “reflect society in an independent creative language and open up new perspectives in terms of content and aesthetics.”

    Straße der Hoffnung / Vonarstræti / Life in A Fishbowl
    Baldvin Z (Zophoníasson), Iceland 2014

     

     

     

    Lübecker Nachrichten.

    The oldest festival prize, was founded in 1979 by the newspaper Lübecker Nachrichten. Since 1993, it includes prize money amounting to the current value of 5,000 euros. The prize is awarded to the winning feature film in competition on the basis of an audience ballot.

    2014
    HalloHallo / HallåHallå / HelloHello
    Maria Blom, Sweden 2013

     

     

     

    Baltic Film Prize for a Nordic Feature Film.

    In 1991, filmmakers from the Baltic States created a film prize for an outstanding feature film from the Nordic countries.

    2014
    Schwedenbastard / Svenskjævel / Underdog
    Ronnie Sandahl, Sweden 2014

     

    Photo: © Ita ZbroneicZajt

     

    Documentary Film Prize.

    The Confederation of German Trade Unions (Deutscher Gewerkschaftsbund) awards a film prize for a “socially and politically committed film” from the festival’s documentary film programme. The award carries a cash prize of 2,500 euros. In previous years, the prize was awarded by the Lübeck Trade unions.

    2014
    Früher träumte ich vom Leben / Näin Unta Elämästä / Once I dreamed of Life
    Jukka Kärkkäinen and Sini Liimatainen, Finland 2014

     

     

    Children’s & Youth Film Prize.

    This prize, created in 1983 by the Nordic Film Institutes, has been awarded to the best Scandinavian children’s or youth film since 1993. A genre which has been an important component of the Nordic Film Days since 1979. From 2008 on this prize is endowed with 5,000 euros, donated by the charitable foundation Gemeinnützige Sparkassenstiftung zu Lübeck.

    2014
    Der Lehrjunge / Oppipoika / The Disciple
    Ulrika Bengts, Finland 2013

     


    57. NORDIC FILM DAYS LÜBECK – Festival opens with “Rams” – Retrospective goes on northerly journeys – INTERFILM honourable membership for Linde Fröhlich.

     

     

    Linde Fröhlich announced the first high point of this year’s festival with the opening night film, “Rams” (Hrútar) by director Grímur Hákonarson, an Icelandic-Danish production that won the Un Certain Regard Prize at this year’s Cannes film festival. The NFL is pleased to welcome the Icelandic director and his two leads, Sigurður Sigurjónsson and Theodór Júlíusson as guests at the NFL opening night celebration on November 4, 2015 in Lübeck (the film will be released in Germany in autumn 2015 by Arsenal Filmverleih).

    “The Icelanders are powerful storytellers and Grímur Hákonarson’s “Rams” is the best example of this.  The film is a human drama, filled with empathy for the protagonists, as well as odd situations and comic moments, all set in a spectacular landscape,” said Linde Fröhlich.

    Curator and director of the Retrospective, Jörg Schöning, presented this year’s look back, dedicated to “Northern journeys. Travelogues & Road Movies”. Audiences will be “transported” back in time with a screening of the silent Swedish outdoor drama “The Strongest” (1929), shown with musical accompaniment in cooperation with the Lübeck Academy of Music under the direction of professor Franz Danksagmüller, as well as by maritime documentation by shipboard photographer Richard Fleischhut (1881 – 1951) and film treasures from the National Library of Norway. On top of that, selected road movies will take audiences on sometimes comic, sometimes melancholy, but always adventurous paths to far-flung locales in the Scandinavian film landscape. The series will include films by Ingmar Bergman, Friðrik Þór Friðriksson, Mika and Aki Kaurismäki, as well as directors Karin Ottarssdóttir and Auli Mantila. The Retrospective will open with the world premiere of “Hit the Road Gunnar” by young director Nicolas Ehret.

    For more information about this years event and other features head over to www.luebeck.de

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    North – Nordic Food Festival

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 3rd September 2015
  • North – Nordic Food Festival comes alive in New York City, September 23-28. Experience an explosion of gastronomical delights from a collaboration of Nordic Chefs. Try the New Nordic Cuisine, experience the different Nordic countries through their food and feed your Nordic passion! Honest Cooking Media, the award-winning food and wine media company behind HonestCooking.com, […]




    North – Nordic Food Festival comes alive in New York City, September 23-28. Experience an explosion of gastronomical delights from a collaboration of Nordic Chefs. Try the New Nordic Cuisine, experience the different Nordic countries through their food and feed your Nordic passion!

    Honest Cooking Media, the award-winning food and wine media company behind HonestCooking.com, proudly presents the NORTH Nordic Food Festival 2015, a six-day celebration of the culinary culture of Denmark, Iceland, Finland and Sweden. The third annual festival will run September 23-28 and comprise a diverse lineup of events including pop-up dinners, cooking classes, cocktail parties and conversations with Nordic gastronomy leaders such as Claus Meyer and Fredrik Berselius.

    A rustic space located at the intersection of Washington Street and Charles Street in New York Citys West Village will be home to NORTH Nordic Food Festival events throughout the week. Dubbed the NORTH Market Square, and influenced by Stockholm’s bustling Haymarket Square, the space is divided into an outdoor area where diners can enjoy Nordic street food and an indoor event space where pop-up dinners, industry talks and cocktail parties will take place.

    For the 3rd year running, Nordic cuisine takes over New York City for five days. Dubbed “the most influential gastronomy movement since the 1960’s”, New Nordic Cuisine has had a huge impact on the world’s dining scene since it first arrived 10 years ago. NORTH Food Festival is your chance to experience the cooking of some of the world’s most exciting Nordic chefs. From exclusive and intimate pop-up dinners, through educational cooking classes, to fun and free events celebrating Nordic food and cooking – at NORTH Food Festival 2015, there is something for everyone. Families, kids, die hard foodies and anyone else who wants to experience a taste of the Nordics are all welcome at the festival!

     

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    About NORTH Nordic Food Festival

    NORTH Nordic Food Festival is the largest celebration of Nordic food outside of Northern Europe and is presented by the award-winning online culinary magazine group Honest Cooking Media. With a focus on the gastronomy, products, personalities and philosophy behind Nordic Cuisine, the festival is a unique chance for chefs, culinary industry guests and diners to experience the wonder and diversity of modern Nordic gastronomy.

    The NORTH Nordic Food Festival 2015 is presented by a diverse group of generous sponsors including the Consulate General of Denmark, the Consulate General of Iceland, Fika, Finnair, Food Organization of Denmark, Iceland Naturally, Iceland Responsible Fisheries, Rekorderlig Cider, Reyka Vodka,Scandic Hotels, VisitDenmark, VisitHensinki, VisitStockholm, and VisitSweden.

     

     

    A Few events for you……

    Wednesday, Sept 23

    Kick Off Cocktail Party 6pm-10pm
    The NORTH 2015 Kick Off Cocktail Party will feature Nordic drinks and bites, and offer the first look at the new West Village location that will host this year’s festival.
    $45

    Chocolate-Making Class at FIKA with Master Chocolatier Håkan Mårtensson 6:30pm-8:30pm

    FIKA: 450 Washington Street in TriBeCa

    Get an inside look at one of Manhattan’s few artisan chocolate factories with chocolate expert Håkan Mårtensson.
    Learn how to source, temper, coat and decorate your own truffles. Enjoy the results over a glass of wine, and take home a “Meet the Medals” 12-piece box of award-winning truffles.
    $100

    FIKA

     

    Thursday, September 24:

    Presented by #TrySwedish, VisitSweden, Stockholm Visitors Board, Scandic Hotels, and Rekorderlig Cider

    #TrySwedish Crayfish Party 4pm-10pm

    Enjoy aquavit, sing-alongs, and the traditional Swedish tradition of boiled crayfish under paper lanterns and the late afternoon summer sun.
    Entrance is free. Crayfish plate: $20

     

     

    An Evening in Stockholm with Restaurant Volt and Rekorderlig Cider 7pm-10pm
    This gourmet pop-up dinner will showcase the innovative cuisine of Michelin-starred restaurant Volt of Stockholm. The city’s rich cultural history will be presented in edible form, at this intimate one-night-only dinner with dishes accompanied by Rekorderlig Cider.
    $150

     

    Friday, September 25: FINLAND DAY

    Presented by Finnair and VisitHelsinki
    #FoodHelYeah Helsinki Street Eats 3pm-10pm

    Join Chef Richard McCormick, one of the driving forces behind street food in Helsinki and the Nordic Region, for a day of Finnish street food.

    Entrance is free. Food and drink available for purchase.

     

    Saturday, September 26: ICELAND DAY

    Presented by Iceland Naturally, Reyka Vodka, and the Consulate General of Iceland in New York

     

     

    Icelandic Brunch with Chef Thrainn Freyr Vigfusson 12pm-3pm

    Brunch Icelandic style with restaurant LAVA Chef Thrainn Freyr Vigfusson’s delicious menu that features traditional Icelandic ingredients in new and surprising ways.

    The nine-dish menu includes smoked trout and pancakes, grilled prime of lamb with skyr rhubarb dressing, traditional Icelandic fish stew with geothermal cooked rye bread, and a cocktail sampling from Reyka Vodka.
    $75

    Baking Class with FIKA Master Baker Robert Tell 4:30pm-6:30pm
    FIKA Tower and Bakery: 824 10th Avenue in Hell’s Kitchen

    Voted one of the Top 10 Bread Bakers in North American by Dessert Professional magazine, FIKA Master Baker Robert Tell is known for his classic Swedish desserts with a modern twist. He’ll lead a hands-on bread and pastry baking demonstration accompanied by wine, FIKA’s crisp bread and signature spreads with cheese. Take home a basket of baked goods along with a recipe card to bring your new baking skills home.

    $85

     

    Sunday, September 27: DENMARK DAY

    Presented by VisitDenmark, F.O.O.D., and the Consulate General of Denmark in New York


    Danish Pølse Hot Dogs and Beer 12pm-10pm

    Join the NORTH Market for a day celebrating the country that kicked off the New Nordic movement, Denmark.  Enjoy smørrebrød, the traditional open-faced sandwich, Danish beer and pølse hot dogs, the classic Danish street food by NYC-based Revolving Dansk.
    Entrance is free
    Food and drink available for purchase

    Monday, September 28
    NORTH TALKS Times TBD

     

     

    Some of the greatest food leaders of Northern Europe and New York City will come together for a series of conversations about what’s next for Nordic cuisine. NORTH Talks will explore trends and Nordic cuisine’s role in the changing culinary landscape.

    Claus Meyer, arguably the biggest name in Danish food, will serve as keynote speaker. He will be joined by a panel of chefs including Fredrik Berseliusand prominent entrepreneurs such as Lars Akerlund, founder of Fika and Siggi Hilmarsson of Siggi’s. Brooklyn Brewery brewmaster Garrett Oliver and other notable New York business leaders will speak about the Nordic influence and how the cuisine has translated into their business.
    Price TBD

    Closing Dinner with Mads Refslund and Fredrik Berselius
    7pm-10pm

    Two powerhouses of the New York restaurant scene will close out the 2015 NORTH Nordic Food Festival
    with a one-night-only collaboration.

    FredrikBerselius, the Swedish founder of the Michelin-starred and much praised ASKA, and Mads Refslund, Executive Chef at ACME and previously the co-founder of Noma Restaurant in Copenhagen, will explore their own Nordic heritage and flavors at this exclusive dinner.
    $179

    Head over to NordicFoodFestival.org to see the rest of the lineup and other events which are taking place over this six day Nordic Food Festival.

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