Norwegian/British band – Sun Up

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , , , 1 Comment
  • 24th September 2015
  • Nordophile is always on the lookout to bring you fresh Nordic music sounds which are creating ripples on the music scene. Occasionally known for its darker melancholy sounds running alongside with upbeat electronic pop, the acts coming out of the Nordics are certainly welcomed in countries fixated on the Nordic genre right now. We were […]




    Nordophile is always on the lookout to bring you fresh Nordic music sounds which are creating ripples on the music scene. Occasionally known for its darker melancholy sounds running alongside with upbeat electronic pop, the acts coming out of the Nordics are certainly welcomed in countries fixated on the Nordic genre right now.

    We were very excited to learn about a London/Norway mixed band called ‘Sun Up’ and wanted to find out more about this group whose track has been shared on Soundcloud this week.

    Listen to the ethereal dreamy voice from Frøydis Erås backed by upbeat pop music.

     

    Frøydis Erås – Voice
    John de Smet – Keys, Samples & Voice
    Maxim Fernandez – Guitar
    Howard de Smet – Bass
    Andrew Lusher – Drums, Samples & Voice

    If you tipped a scoop of Scandinavian snow, a handful of Hackney muck, and five friends in a blender, you’d get Sun Up, a new electro-speckled pop band hailing from Norway and London. Led by frontwoman Frøydis Erås, this five-piece uniquely weave together the introspective quirk of rural Scandinavia with the Technicolor clatter of metropolitan life.

    Sun Up’s first track ‘Machines’, a bedroom demo recorded and uploaded with minimal fanfare, immediately caught the attention of music tastemaker blogs such as Crack In The Road, Breaking More Waves and Gold Flake Paint.

    At their third ever gig, Sun Up were spotted by veteran booking agent Dave Chumbley at Primary Talent (Lana Del Rey, Alt-J, Wolf Alice) and spent the remainder of the year supporting the likes of Childhood, The Joy Formidable, and Phoria.

    Sun Up’s official debut track ‘Anchors’ is the crystallization of the band’s distinctive Anglo-Scandi DNA. Recorded during the pre-dawn hours of studio downtime by up-and-coming producer Neil Tollitt (Låpsley, Swim Deep, Pussy Riot), ‘Anchors’ is a glittering pop Trojan Horse hiding a bleak, broken heart.

    ‘Bursting with joy but tinged with something that sits between desire and the crushing weight of regret… understated brilliance’ – Gold Flake Paint

    ‘One of our new favourite voices… it took us just twenty-five seconds to fall in love’ – Breaking More Waves

    ‘Fantastic… Sun Up are well worth keeping an eye on’ – Crack In The Road

    -->

    Nordic Bakery celebrates Cinnamon Bun Day

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , , , , , Leave a comment
  • 23rd September 2015
  • One of the best ways to experience a country is through its cuisine and one of the best ways to gauge how important tradition is to a country, is through the esteem in which it holds it traditions. So when people are curious about why there is a Cinnamon Bun Day (Kanelbullens dag) in Sweden, […]




    One of the best ways to experience a country is through its cuisine and one of the best ways to gauge how important tradition is to a country, is through the esteem in which it holds it traditions. So when people are curious about why there is a Cinnamon Bun Day (Kanelbullens dag) in Sweden, what they should really be acknowledging is just how proud the Swedes are of their heritage, offerings and identity. A Cinnamon Bun sums this up perfectly! The smells and taste involved in the making and execution, many Swedes away from home say conjure up childhood memories of these delights being made. It is also a very symbolic social thing as the Cinnamon Bun is often hand in hand with the other time old tradition, the Fika, which is a moment in the day to take time out have a coffee and a bun and sit with friends and family to not let the day slip by.

     

     

    With Nordic Bakery serving not only its Nordic community in and around London but many Nordophiles for miles around who started out curious and are now hooked on some of the sweet delicacies from our favourite Nordic countries, Nordic Bakery will be proudly flying the flag for Cinnamon Bun Day (Kanelbullens dag). Come and enjoy a perfectly crafted bun or any one of their other bites and involve yourself in the festivities from the 28th Sept to 4th Oct.

    The Cinnamon Bun has been around since the 1920’s and has been celebrated since 1999 so this is still a relatively new festival, however it is embraced wholeheartedly and is definitely a fun way for any Nordophile to join in.

    Nordic Bakery have kindly sent us a recipe for the Cinnamon Bun from Miisa Mink ‘The Nordic bakery Cookbook’ by Ryland, Peters, Small and they tell us a little bit about what we can expect over the week long celebrations

     

    Created for Nordic Bakery Cinnamon bun week of celebrations – a caramel and pecan cinnamon bun which will be on sale next week only.

     

    Nordic Bakery, the Scandinavian style premium coffee shop chain, is giving Londoners a taste extravaganza of cinnamon buns with a week-long cinnamon bun celebration at all three London coffee shops (from 28 September – October 2014). Fans travel from all over London and abroad for Nordic Bakery’s iconic cinnamon buns (applauded by Time Out, Vogue and Evening Standard). Now they can have their favourite taste in a five different flavours (including cinnamon bun with blueberry and cinnamon bun with chocolate) with a different variety available during the Monday to Friday of Cinnamon Bun Week. The celebrations reach a peak at the weekend, when fans can choose from all the cinnamon bun flavours

    Dough

    570ml lukewarm milk

    150g caster sugar

    45g fresh yeast (or easy baked dried yeast according to manufacturer’s instructions)

    1 tsp cardamom seeds, crushed with a pestle and mortar

    180g unsalted butter, melted

    1 egg

    1 kg plain flour

    Filling

    100g unsalted butter, softened at room temperature

    200g dark brown soft sugar

    3 Tbsp ground cinnamon

    Glaze

    85g caster sugar

    1 Tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice

    2 baking trays, lined with non-stick baking paper

     

    Nordic Bakery cinnamon bun and cappuccino (1)

     

    To make the dough, put the milk, sugar, yeast, cardamom, melted butter and egg in a food processor or mixer with a dough hook.  With the motor running, gradually add the flour until it is all incorporated and the dough has come together.

     

    Transfer the dough to a bowl, cover with a clean tea towel and leave to prove in a warm place for 1 hour, or until it has doubled in size.

     

    After 1 hour, punch down the dough and transfer onto a lightly floured surface. Using a rolling pin, roll it out until it is about 30 x 80cm and 7mm thick.

     

    For the filling, spread the butter evenly over the dough and sprinkle the sugar and cinnamon all over the top.

    Roll the dough up from a long side. Cut into roughly 6-cm rolls, but cut them at an angle – so, make the first cut diagonally, then the second cut about 6cm along diagonally in the opposite direction. You should get a roll that looks like a trapezium (or a triangle with the tip chopped off). Carefully transfer the buns to the prepared baking trays, with the longest edge of the bun sitting on the tray, cover with tea towers again and leave to prove in a warm place for 30-60 mins, until almost doubled in size.

     

    Preheat oven to 200C or 400F or Gas 6. Bake the buns in the preheated oven for 20-25min or until golden brown.

     

    To make the glaze, put the sugar, lemon juice and 100ml water in a small saucepan and bring to the boil. Simmer for 10-15 min, until slightly thickened. The glaze will still be quite watery.

     

    Remove the buns from the oven, transfer onto a wire rack and brush the glaze generously over them. Leave to cool before serving.

    Head over to Nordicbakery to find out more

     

    -->

    Fika London

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
  • 3rd June 2015
  • fika-london

    FIKA Bar & Kitchen first opened its doors early 2008, thanks to Sadaf, a Swede who after more than 10 years in the UK felt she needed to bring the Swedish Fika tradition to London Having a ‘FIKA’ is good for you. Whether you’re bored or over stimulated, busy or twiddling your thumbs – it’s good […]




    FIKA Bar & Kitchen first opened its doors early 2008, thanks to Sadaf, a Swede who after more than 10 years in the UK felt she needed to bring the Swedish Fika tradition to London
    meatballs
    Having a FIKA’ is good for you. Whether you’re bored or over stimulated, busy or twiddling your thumbs – it’s good to remove yourself from your everyday routine to relax, unwind, catch up with friends and be re-inspired.
    fika-london
    In its truest sense, it means to have a coffee break. But this has evolved into a cultural phenomenon combining food, drink and company. We embrace Fika in all its forms and welcome you to have yours the way you like it
    Elve's Touch
    FIKA is a little oasis (check out the not so secret roof garden!) on busy Brick Lane open every weekday from 12am – 11pm & 10am – midnight on weekends. The Fika family creates a quirky and cosy atmosphere and serves delicious Scandinavian inspired dishes, treats and drinks. 
    cinnamon-bun-fika
    FIKA is also a creative space made to inspire. The Fika team welcomes pop-ups, holds workshops and events and has also launched Fika the shop, showcasing beautiful items that will make great gifts, for your loved ones or yourself. 
    fika-london
    -->

    Den Danske Kirke – A big event coming up

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , Leave a comment
  • 17th May 2015
  • The front of the Danish Church in London

    Den Danske Kirke in London was brought to my attention by a family member back in Denmark. So after some digging I found a place which has a multitude of offerings to welcome any Nordophile into the Danish culture.   The Danish church in London is a place to welcome  the Danish living in the […]




    Den Danske Kirke in London was brought to my attention by a family member back in Denmark. So after some digging I found a place which has a multitude of offerings to welcome any Nordophile into the Danish culture.

    The towers of the Danish Church in London

     

    The Danish church in London is a place to welcome  the Danish living in the area, the church and services are important but so are the get-togethers and community events that they share with people around them. Based at St Katharine’s Precinct, London, I would recommend any Nordophile from anywhere to enjoy one of their events.

    I spoke with Marika about up and coming celebrations that any Nordophile can attend if they want to meet Danish people living in and around London, enjoy some Danish food and be part of the celebrations that bring together two communities, in one place.

    I spoke with Marika from the church who was more than willing to talk about all the lovely things the church offers the community.

    How else does Den Danske Kirke embrace the local community and what other Danish delights does it offer?

    On a day to day basis, we have a little shop in our basement which is open in the church’s opening hours. The café is mainly open in connection with events.

    The website also offers details about their Danish lessons, so you can fully immerse yourself in the Danish culture.

    The lessons are broken down into classes for children and adults (times and dates are on the web site).

    The Danish Church in London

    Once you’ve mastered some Danish you will be able to enjoy a lot more.

    We celebrate Christmas, Carnival (Fastelavn) and Midsummer (Skt. Hans) and in May the Bazaar takes place in the Church and in the surrounding garden. We host Danish lessons, the Book Club, Mums and Toddlers’ group (Mødregruppe), the Sewing Club and many Danish associations. You can come here for concerts with Danish artists, to sing Danish songs, see new Danish films, take part in conference days, and when the Danish football team plays an international match you can watch the game on a widescreen with other Danes.

    Missed the Danish Summer Bazaar that has just gone?……..Don’t worry….book in your calendar of Nordophile events another big event, the celebration of Sankt Hans, Midsummer on the 20th of June. The Sankt Hans event is just a turn up (from 7pm) – there might be a small entrance fee on the door, which all goes to a refurbishing project in the Church. Everyone is welcome, so come along and enjoy meeting new friends, Danish and English, around a bonfire in the garden and traditional midsummer songs and a speech. Beer and hotdogs of course are on the menu!

     

     

     

     

    -->

    Nordic Bakery – London

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , Leave a comment
  • 11th May 2015
  • Miisa Mink sits in front of the Nordic Bakery

    Nordic Bakery is a Scandinavian style premium coffee shop chain taking its inspiration from Finland’s coffee shops. The idea was to bring Nordic ‘dark rye bread, cinnamon buns and coffee’ to London with a quiet, stylish cafe.  No one else was doing it.  And Nordic Bakery is still quite unique even though we’ve been around […]




    Nordic Bakery is a Scandinavian style premium coffee shop chain taking its inspiration from Finland’s coffee shops.

    The idea was to bring Nordic ‘dark rye bread, cinnamon buns and coffee’ to London with a quiet, stylish cafe.  No one else was doing it.  And Nordic Bakery is still quite unique even though we’ve been around for eight years now.

    A basket filled with Karelian Pies

    The first Nordic Bakery opened in 2007 in the heart of Soho.  The aim was to find somewhere located just off the small, busy streets of Soho but with a more open space – and the small greenery of Golden Square was ideal.

    The other two cafes (in New Cavendish Street and Dorset Street) also offer Londoners a quiet ambiance unlike other coffee shops. One is located just off Marylebone High Street, the other off Baker Street and both provide a peaceful haven where people can meet and enjoy each other’s company over a great cup of coffee.

    Miisa Mink sits in front of the Nordic Bakery

     

    Miisa Mink, now co-owner

    One of the people behind the business is Miisa Mink (who become involved with the business in 2008). She is co-owner of Nordic Bakery, author of Nordic Bakery Cookbook and the ‘public face’ of the business.

    A passionate cook, she grew up in a foodie family 30 miles north of Helsinki, learning to fish and forage for berries and mushrooms in the forests.  Family summers were spent at Lake Saimaa in south east Finland where she spent her time outdoors learning about the wild food from the lake and forest. Her love of baking started at an early age. There was always fresh bread at home, baked by her father who ground his own flour from whole grains bought locally.

    This simple self-sufficiency and appreciation for nature and its ingredients is a way of life for many Finnish people, and it is these values that are reflected in Nordic Bakery’s philosophy.

    Today, Miisa lives in London. Before becoming involved in Nordic Bakery, she built a successful career in design, having founded a design and branding agency.  This creativity can be seen in the aesthetics of Nordic Bakery’s cafes, by the beautiful selection of interior design pieces and careful presentation of food.

    -->