Finnish artist & photographer – Milla Koivisto

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 5th February 2016
  • Kaikubanner

    Nordophile was very excited to come across Finnish artist & photographer, Milla Koivisto. Not purely just because of her breath-taking artistic view of the Nordic landscape but also because of her natural intensity when relating back to her audience her vision. Milla Koivisto is an artist, photographer and author from Finland. Her focus is on the […]




    Nordophile was very excited to come across Finnish artist & photographer, Milla Koivisto. Not purely just because of her breath-taking artistic view of the Nordic landscape but also because of her natural intensity when relating back to her audience her vision.

    Milla Koivisto is an artist, photographer and author from Finland. Her focus is on the natural world and our connections and relationship with it. Milla studied both illustration and visual communication at the Arts University of Bournemouth. She also studied classical flute and music theatre in Finland. She works with several artistic disciplines and her interest lies in narrative structures and storytelling. She currently divides her time between Finland and the UK.

     

    Kaiku

    We were keen to understand more about the Kaiku project from this Finnish artist and find out how this would translate to peak the interest of Nordophiles, with a certain attraction to the Nordic arts, in all genres.

    Kaiku is an audio-visual project, structured around a core narrative. Set in and inspired by the Nordic landscape of the Finnish archipelago, Kaiku tells the story of a reclusive Shaman, a flute playing girl called Aino and her echo Kaiku. The protagonists of the story face the harshness and the isolation brought by the landscape and each of their lives is a manifestation of learning and surviving by the stipulations of nature. Music and sound in the natural world become ways of connecting, coping and conveying feelings in the dialogue-less story of Kaiku.

    In the Kaiku project traditional storytelling is combined with modern narrative technique. The project combines words, images, recorded sound, compositions and video. The Kaiku project will be released in a series of exhibitions, events and talks during 2015-2017.

     

    The Kaiku Series

    The first short film in the Kaiku series, ‘The Old Woman’ is an exploration of solitude through sound and image and portrays the landscape of an old woman called Aino’s soul. The film was shot during a three month stay on a treeless lighthouse island of Bengtskär in the Baltic Sea in Finland.

     

     

    The Kaiku book

    The first part of the Kaiku project is an illustrated, fictional book. Set on a small island where the winter days are short and the summer sun never sets and life must adapt to the changing seasons. A vision of two women with the same face sets a reclusive shaman on a journey from his dark forest cabin to the barren, windswept shores of a lighthouse.

    In Kaiku our relationship with nature is explored through sounds and seasons. Set over the course of a year in the isolation of a small island Kaiku  is the result of a long-running fascination with traditional narrative, folklore and the natural environment.

     

    To order the book and find out more about Milla Koivisto head over to Millakoivisto.com

    Milla talks about the origins of the Kaiku project on her site which gives us an insight into her thought process and how the idea was born.

    “A story had been brewing in my mind for some time, not leaving me alone. On the last day of December 2012 I sat down at my desk in my apartment in Brighton and started to write. I have always been writing stories, but never been mature enough to sit still long enough to finish a longer piece. Writing a book is of course more then just an endurance sport -it is about finding a story you believe in, are passionate about and know is true. For me there was only one thing I could write about. I had to write about the sea and the island I grew up on. The project became a love letter to the landscape I knew. I was brought up on a small island called Kemiönsaari in the south coast of Finland, in the Baltic Sea. At the time I started writing Kaiku I had been living in the UK for seven years. I realised how little was written or known about the Finnish culture outside Finland. It became clear to me that the story needed to be written in English, so I added this on to my challenge and started writing in my third language.

    I started to write about an island, about a Shaman, a girl called Aino and her echo Kaiku. Kaiku in Finnish is both a name and the event of a sound caused by the reflection of sound waves from a surface back to the listener – an echo. What I wanted to portray in the story was the interconnection with the natural world and the people. It was important for me to show the integral connection between the people and their land. It also became a story about solitude, isolation and loneliness, themes I feel are close to the Finnish people through our characteristics, the geographical location of the country and perhaps even through the dissimilarity of our language compared to most other European languages.

     

     

    From the very beginning I wanted to create a whole world around the story of Kaiku. I wanted to not only to tell a story with words but also to make it come alive with sound and images. Kaiku became a multidisciplinary project structured around a core narrative. It is a project combining words, image, sound and music and video. So far the project has taken me to three small islands in Finland. In Summer 2014 I spent a month on the island of Kökar, in the Baltic Sea in Finland, living in the old post office that was converted in to an artist residence. My purpose was to compose and collect natural sounds for the project. I returned to the island in January 2015 to further compose and collect, this time the sound world of the Nordic winter. In summer of 2015 I divided my time living in Kemiönsaari and the small lighthouse island of Bengtskär at the Baltic Sea where I filmed and recorded natural sounds.

    Kaiku is an ongoing project which will be completed in 2017. The first part of the project, is a book titled Kaiku.”

    Contact Milla here

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    Helsinki Design Week

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 1st September 2015
  • About Founded in 2005, Helsinki Design Week is the largest design festival in the Nordic countries. Held annually in September, the multidisciplinary festival presents design from a number of fields as well as fashion, architecture and urban culture. Helsinki Design Week will be held 3.–13.9.2015. Helsinki Design Week presents the new faces and phenomena of design, […]




    About

    Founded in 2005, Helsinki Design Week is the largest design festival in the Nordic countries. Held annually in September, the multidisciplinary festival presents design from a number of fields as well as fashion, architecture and urban culture. Helsinki Design Week will be held 3.–13.9.2015.

    Helsinki Design Week presents the new faces and phenomena of design, promotes design internationally in collaboration with various partners and offers city citizens through design a forum to participate in developing and discussing the city and its culture. The festival programme contains around 150 events every year, and includes both events targeted for professionals and the general public.

    The Helsinki Design Week main events are produced by Helsinki Design Week and its main partners. The Helsinki Design Week programme is produced in cooperation with national and international stakeholders and an extensive event-planning network. The programme is completed with selected events from an open call for programme entries. In 2014 the festival boasted about 110,000 visitors.

    The festival programme takes place in a variety of event spaces spread throughout the city: from museums to markets, from seminar halls to secret shops. The festival also actively seeks new spaces and ways to explore the city.

    Helsinki Design Week is produced by the design service agency Luovi Productions Oy.

     

    Featured events

    Below you will find some of the Design inspired events taking place throughout Helsinki Design Week. But there is so much more going on including a Lego Collective Workshop, The Children’s Weekend and A Focus on the Future of Cities. Check out on their site!

     

    A Workshop by Proloque Shop 10.9.15

    © JONNA JÄRVINEN

    ..”a workshop may be a room or building which provides both the area and tools (or machinery) that may be required for the manufacture or repair of manufactured goods.” (wiki)

    Proloque believes in the future of a fascinating live shop experience and unforgattable objects. Proloque Shop invited set designer and artist Jonna Järvinen to A WORKSHOP by Proloque Shop. In this Helsinki Design Week -evening Järvinen will finalize her magnificent dome-installations for Proloque, also upon customers wishes. Jonna Järvinen’s dome-installations are fascinating micro worlds that pay attention to the small details in life and nature surrounding us.

    You are welcome to follow and interact with her work or just enjoy our HDW evening,  where both beautiful objects and a shop comes alive. Small refreshments will be served.

     

    Cityspace 3-13.9.15

     

     

     

    A multi-dimensional meeting point of art and design, built out of containers by the seaside, right next to the newly renovated Old market hall of Helsinki. The transformable containers will work as a stage for surprising spaces and events where people and companies from different fields meet and create new and lively urban city culture. The event is produced by Hei Helsinki and Misc. Management.

     

    Anthology of Finnish Fashion 3-13.9.15

     

     

    This exhibition approaches its topic through nine themes: Folk, Globalization, The Engineering Mindset, The Millennium, Modernism, Change, the Economic Boom, Winter and Equality.

    In this exhibition, fashion is understood in a broad sense. The exhibits include technological clothing design, such as a motorcycle outfit and smart sportswear.

    The heritage of modernism is prominent in Finnish fashion design. Typical features of Finnish fashions in the spirit of modernism are practicality, functionalism and usability. The Modernism theme features work by Samuji and Irja Leimu, among others. On the other hand, the idiom of form is also influenced by colourful folk-inspired maximalism and decorativeness. The designers presented in the Folk theme include Sophie Sälekari and Annikki Karvinen.

    The conditions under which Finnish fashion and clothing designers have worked have changed radically from the 1950s to the present day. During the heyday of the Finnish fashion and clothing industry from the late 1960s to the beginning of the 1990s, there were over 500 manufacturers in this sector, employing a large number of designers. When trade with the Soviet Union collapsed and the clothing industry moved out of Finland, designers had to find new ways of earning their livelihood. Around the turn of the millennium,  brands established by young designers began to emerge in Finland. At present, Finnish fashion is a seamless part of international fashion.

    Designers and brands featured in the exhibition include Achilles Ion Gabriel,Ivana Helsinki, Jasmiine Julin-Aro, Karhu, Satu Maaranen, Makia,Marimekko, Mattisen Teollisuus, Daniel Palillo, Plastic Pony, Jukka Rintala,Anna Ruohonen and Vuokko.

    The curators of the exhibition are Suvi Saloniemi, Chief Curator of Exhibitions at Design Museum and journalist Liisa Jokinen. The exhibition architecture is by Linda Bergroth.

     

    I Heart Vallila 5.9.15

     

     

    The I Heart Vallila -urban event takes place on 5 September in Vallila. The event opens up the workshops, companies and brick-and-mortar shops of Vallila and makes visible the creative professionals working in the neighbourhood. Doors will be open and everyone is invited to meet the makers and creative workers of Vallila.

     

    The Charm of Musical Instruments 5.9.15

     

     

    Families are invited to the world of musical instruments in order to discover how the shape of the instrument affects its sound. Heureka Science Centre organises a workshop where children (5 years or older) can make curious and surprising “scientific” musical instruments. Jamkids Music School offers a music workshop where everyone can play. Jug band Dog in a Bucket presents and plays their home-made instruments.

    Children can try various instruments under the guidance of music teachers from the North Helsinki Music School. Mubik, a mobile game and virtual musical instrument, is presented as an example of the future.

    The event takes place in the Music! exhibition of the Helsinki City Museum.

    To meet the rest of the team and find out more about the events, head over to www.HelsinkiDesignWeek.com

     

     

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    The Nordic Council Film Prize 2015

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 31st August 2015
  • The Nordic Council Film Prize nominations for 2015 are out. The purpose of The Nordic Council Film Prize is to support the production of Nordic films in order to strengthen the Nordic film industry, thereby in the long term contributing to the strengthening of Nordic films internationally.     The winner will be a feature […]




    The Nordic Council Film Prize nominations for 2015 are out.

    The purpose of The Nordic Council Film Prize is to support the production of Nordic films in order to strengthen the Nordic film industry, thereby in the long term contributing to the strengthening of Nordic films internationally.

     

     

    The winner will be a feature film that is rooted in Nordic culture, is of high artistic quality and stands out through its artistic originality to form a harmonious work. Innovation within the film genre will also be given positive consideration when comparing the nominated films. The films nominated must primarily be recorded in a Nordic language to be considered for the Film Prize.

    The prize was awarded for the first time on a trial basis in 2002 in connection with the Nordic Council’s 50th anniversary. It became permanent in 2005 and has since been awarded along with the Nordic Council’s other prizes for music, literature, and nature and the environment.

     

    image_16_9_bigger (12)

    The Nordic Council Film Prize 2009 was awarded to the Danish film director and scriptwriter Lars von Trier and producer Meta Louise Foldager for the film ANTICHRIST.

     

    A member of the jury from every Nordic country

    Each Nordic country appoints one jury member and a substitute. These people are film connoisseurs but must be independent of the film industry in their home country and have no personal financial interest in the nominated films.

     

    Nordic Jury appoints the prize winner

    The national jury members form a Nordic Adjudication Committee. The national jury member proposes the nominations from his/her own country. The film nominations are made public at the beginning of September. After that it is the combined Nordic adjudication committee which decides which of the nominated films – one from each Nordic country – will win the prize.

    Films from the Faroe Islands, Greenland and Åland are outside the countries quota of one film each. Nominated films from these countries must be submitted to the Nordic Adjudication Committee. When a Faroese, Greenlandic or Ålandic film has to be judged a jury member from that country is co-opted onto the committee.

     

     

    Film prize divided between three main functions

    The Nordic Council Film Prize is administered by the Nordic Film and TV Fund and is worth DKK 350,000 (approx. €47,000), and thus has the same value as the literature, nature and the environment, and music prizes. The prize money is to be shared between the scriptwriter, the director and the producer, which underlines that film as an art form is the result of close co-operation between these three main functions.

    The Film Prize is usually awarded with the other Nordic prizes for literature, music and nature and the environment during the Nordic Council’s Ordinary Session in the autumn at a special ceremony.

    Previous winners of the Film Prize include Danish Per Fly’s film ‘Drabet’ (‘Manslaughter’) and the film ‘Zozo’ by Josef Fares from Sweden.

     

    The Nordic Council Film Prize Nominations 2015

     

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    Stille hjerte (Silent Heart) – Denmark

     

    Masterfully crafted and played to perfection, director Bille August and screenwriter Christian Torpe tell a warm-hearted story about an unforgettable weekend where a family has to deal with a mother’s wish to die. In the typically Nordic tradition of exorcising all skeletons from the closet, the film dissects one of the most difficult challenges a family can face – saying goodbye to a loved one.

     

    He ovat paenneet (They Have Escaped) – Finland

     

    A gripping coming-of-age drama, a thrilling road movie, a drug-induced fantasy and then some! Jukka-Pekka Valkeapää’s They Have Escaped flirts with genre characteristics only to rise above their respective dynamics and to metamorphose into an expressionistic, no holds barred adult fairytale. The exquisite cinematography combined with a thoughtful, multifaceted soundtrack adds to film’s strong, dreamlike ambiance.

     

    Fúsi (Virgin Mountain) – Iceland

     

    With a delicate touch, director Dagur Kári´s Virgin Mountain is a moving coming-of-age portrait of a gentle giant. In a skilfully nuanced way this humanistic film conveys both inner torment and offbeat charm, while its symbolic interaction of items big and small conveys such universal themes as goodness, giving and grace.

     

    Mot naturen (Out of Nature) – Norway

     

    In Out of Nature, Ole Giæver portrays a self-reflection of our modern lives and today’s Nordic man. A personal yet forthright narrative conveys a collage of mental imagery to express memories, hopes, dreams, and emotive atmospheres, yet all in a good humour that addresses embarrassment, shame and pain.

     

    Gentlemen- Sweden

     

    Gentlemen takes us on a winding journey of a story in which time perspectives and identities are as fluid as the boundary between dreams and fantasy. The attention to detail in the film’s various expressions culminates in a uniquely personal, playful and self-reflective work.

    Photos & text credited to Norden.org

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    Helsinki Festival

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 7th August 2015
  • ISO_Carmen_credits_Janne-Mikkila

    Helsinki Festival is the largest arts festival in Finland, organised annually in late summer. The festival’s aim is to make art accessible for all. In 2015, the Helsinki Festival is arranged from August 14-30. The Night of the Arts is arranged on 20 August 2015.   Compañía Kaari & Roni Martin; KILL Carmen   Featured events […]




    Helsinki Festival is the largest arts festival in Finland, organised annually in late summer. The festival’s aim is to make art accessible for all.

    In 2015, the Helsinki Festival is arranged from August 14-30.
    The Night of the Arts is arranged on 20 August 2015.

     

    ISO_Carmen_credits_Janne-Mikkila

    Compañía Kaari & Roni Martin; KILL Carmen

     

    Featured events

    Art goes Kapakka

    Ten days, ten nights and more than 300 events taking place across Helsinki’s bars, restaurants and cafes. Art goes Kapakka brings together interesting and insightful art, the city’s finest gastronomic delights and some fantastic crowds – and is a chance for established artists to preview their latest ideas and newcomers to do some profile raising.

    Throw yourself in and enjoy unforgettable AgK moments in the dark August nights. The long-awaited programme is due to be announced in summer 2015. See you there!

     

    ISO_AGK-JV-2015_kuvat-Heini-Lehvaslaiho-ja-Ville-Malja

     

    30th Helsinki Comics Festival

    This year, the largest comic festival in Northern Europe is also turning its gaze toward Asia and moving its normal timetable up by one week. The special themes for 2015 are zines and small press, Hong Kong and Korea. The programme will include, e.g., a comic market, Small Press heaven, comic artists, gallery exhibitions throughout the city, discussions, lectures, live drawing sessions, competitions, animations, a children’s programme and evening clubs.

    sarjakuvafestivaalit.fi

    In co-operation with:
    Suomen sarjakuvaseura, Sarjakuvakeskus artgoeskapakka.fi

     

    ISO_Sarjakuvafestivaali-jussi-pakkanen

     

    Helsinki Night Market

    At last! After two years of waiting, the Helsinki Night Market offers the possibility of tasting insects. More than ten different street stalls set up with a variety of night-time delicacies from traditional Asian treats to more exotic flavours. This year, insect food cooks from Shanghai conjure up snacks from all kinds of insects.

    Inside the red-brick yard, there is a diverse and zany combination of art forms, glow-in-the-dark lions and dragons, and of course, live music. There are also activities for the smaller members of the family. The event continues on Friday!

    teurastamo.com

    In co-operation with:
    The Abattoir (Teurastamo), Centre of International Cultural Exchange, Chinese Ministry of Culture

     

    Iso_Teurastamo2-credit-Sasa-Tkalcan

     

    Searching for Janne

    In honour of the 150th anniversary, students from the Theatre Academy read the Sibelius biography by Erik Tawaststjerna in pop-up events all over the city. Find yourself in situations that uplift beyond everyday life in unexpected locations throughout the Festival!

    Performed in Finnish.

    In co-operation with: Theatre Academy OP

     

    ISO_Janne

     

    Giants

    Enormous, eight-metre giants come to life at Night of the Arts! Where are they from? How did they get here and why? Helsinki Festival and Helsingin Sanomat join the city residents in welcoming these rare guests with open arms. Join in the fun of building giant wicker beings in free workshops co-ordinated by EMMA. The event will culminate in the giants coming to life, and that can happen only with your help!

    Night of the Arts thu 20.8.
    The Giants come to life at Senate Square at 19.00

    Concept, production: BeNoît Mousserion & Bérangère Pajaud, Cie l’Homme debout

    Co-operation: EMMA – Espoo Museum of Modern Art

    In partnership with: Helsingin Sanomat

     

    ISO_Homme-debout3_credits_Cie-Homme-Debout-Poitiers

     

    Susanne Sundfør; Color Dolor

    Dramatic, elegant, cinematic, unapologetic, inspiring. These adjectives, among others, have been used to describe Susanne Sundfør, a young talent at the top of the charts in Norway. Sundfør, 29, has already recorded six albums and collaborated with the Norwegian group Röyksopp and the French group M83. Sundfør has moved from nostalgic folk music to dark pop and gloomy electronic music. Her newest album, Ten Love Songs, is like Kate Bush meets disco.

    The warm-up act for the evening, Color Dolor from Helsinki, leads you into a vortex of experimental, dream-like and unexpected soundscapes. Underneath the wild sound, there is classy, dynamic pop playing that is guaranteed to lift your dancing feet off the floor.

    Color Dolor starts at 7 p.m. Susanne Sundfør starts at 8.15 p.m.
    Doors: 6 p.m.

    For this event you can purchase a meal by Restaurant Juuri beforehand!

    Age limit: 18

    ISO_SusanneSundfor_PressImage-credit-Luke-Gilford

    credit Luke Gilford

     

    Director of Helsinki Festival – Erik Söderblom

    The Tree Booms

    Boom 1: Changing China

    Circus, dance, design, rock, symphony, cartoons, kites and street food. As part of the 2015 Helsinki Festival, we present Focus: China, one of the most comprehensive looks at Chinese culture seen in Europe over the past years. We are not interested in how different or exotic the Chinese are as such, but rather how similar we humans ultimately are.

    The world has changed China. Now China is changing the world at a pace. If you dig deep enough in Finland, you get to China, they say. The 2015 Helsinki Festival provides you with shovels for the exploration.

    Boom 2: Changing musical theatre

    Theatre changes, music changes, dance changes. Perhaps musical theatre is the art form which, in embracing the world, ultimately best describes our multifaceted modern reality. This has been understood by the modern generation of composers – more than 20 of them are currently working on an opera or musical theatre project. Finland is experiencing a well-hidden musical theatre boom! The 2015 Helsinki Festival programme contains a small part thereof: three premieres of Finnish musical theatre works.

    Boom 3: Continuing agent of change

    The Huvila Festival Tent, the agent of change in the city’s music scene, celebrates its 20th anniversary! Over the years, this Tokoinranta landmark has fed the fires of passion, introduced new artists of all sorts and launched one star after another into the musical sky of Helsinki. And it will do so this summer as well. The agent of change continues!

    In this landscape of change, after six festivals, I bid farewell to the wonderful audience of the Helsinki Festival with this year’s programme and welcome my successor, Topi Lehtipuu.

    The world is changing – art makes the transition easier.

     

    Erik2-c-Sasa-Tkalcan

    photo; Sasa Tkalcan

    Check out Helsinki Festival

     

     

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    Finnish author – Markus Ahonen

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 15th July 2015
  • Markus1_mv

    Nordophile spoke with the Finnish author – Markus Ahonen about his success with Nordic noir and children’s books and found out how his passion for writing allows him to cross two of the most opposite genres, with ease. Markus was born in 1972 in Helsinki, Finland and grew up in Martinlaakso, a suburb of Vantaa, known as […]




    Nordophile spoke with the Finnish author – Markus Ahonen about his success with Nordic noir and children’s books and found out how his passion for writing allows him to cross two of the most opposite genres, with ease.

    Markus was born in 1972 in Helsinki, Finland and grew up in Martinlaakso, a suburb of Vantaa, known as the childhood residence of famous Formula One drivers Mika Häkkinen, Mika Salo and Kimi Räikkönen and heavy metal band Amorphis.

    Markus1_mv

    After spending a year as an exchange student in Upstate New York and studying Communications and Finnish Literature in Turku, he has worked extensively as Editor and Editor-in-chief in local newspapers, as TV Script Writer for Finnish versions of game show Weakest Link and the Finnish modified version from shows Never Mind the Buzzcocks and They Think It’s All Over as well as writing TV sketch comedy.

    After moving to Ireland in 2006, Markus has worked as a flying foreign correspondent having reported to newspapers and magazines from several dozen countries around Europe and elsewhere.
    His first crime novel Meduusa (Medusa) was awarded with third prize in Kouvola Crime Literature Festival 10th anniversary novel contest in 2006. The second crime-themed novel Palava sydän (Burning Heart) was published in 2008. Short story collection My Hometown Named Love was published as an e-book in English in March 2012 and in Finnish as Kotipaikkani on rakkaus in October the same year. The updated new versions of Meduusa and Palava sydän were published as e-books in Finnish in late 2012.

    Markus widened his literary career by publishing a story collection for children Karkaileva bussi ja kaiken maailman ihmeelliset vempeleet (Runaway Bus and All Other Marvelous Gadgets) as an e-book and the story collection for children and adults, Haikarasaaren vauvasatama ja muita tarinoita (Heron Island Baby Harbour and other stories) both in November 2012.
    In late 2012 and early 2013, Meduusa reached continuously the #1 spot in iTunes Finland e-book top100 chart.
    Meduusa and Palava sydän have both reached the #1 spot in iTunes Finland Mysteries and Thrillers top10 chart often holding #1 and #2 spots at the same time together.
    Meduusa was chosen to Apple iBookstore Best of 2012 catalog Top Fiction category in December 2012 and again year later into their Best of 2013 catalog. This time in the category: Most sold: Fiction. It is one of the most sold e-books ever in Apple iTunes Finland. Medusa was published in English as an e-book in August, 2013.
    In March 2013, Karkaileva bussi ja kaiken maailman ihmeelliset vempeleet reached #1 in iTunes Finland Children’s literature chart.

    Medusaengl

    By the end of 2013, Apple iTunes Finland selected Markus and his works into their Bestselling Authors category. The category consists of 14 authors, of whom 9 are non-Finns and 5 Finns. Authors in addition to Markus in the category are: Jo Nesbø, Reijo Mäki, Nora Roberts, Miika Nousiainen, Tess Gerritsen, Stephen King, Cassandra Clare, Liza Marklund, Donna Leon, Eve Hietamies, Patricia Cornwell, Conn Iggulden and Anna-Leena Härkönen.

    Jäljet (Tracks), the third novel in crime-themed Isaksson series was published as an e-book in Finnish in April 2014.

    Markus has been a member of Irish Writers’ Union since 2012.

    Markus, a film, book, music, exercise and general knowledge enthusiast, lives in Malahide, County Dublin, Ireland with his son.

    Karkaileva Bussi

     

    Interview

    Was it a conscious decision to become an author or have you always written, so it was a natural progression?

    I liked writing already as a child and remember having a writing flow at age 7. Somewhere around age 13 or 14, I realised I was observing people, how they behave, what kind of personalities they are. Even the passers-by or people sitting in the buses. I started writing these observations as texts inside my head. So I think it was partially constructed inside of me. Also because it apparently has run in the family. My late Dad wrote, as did my Grandpa, his sister, my Greatgrandpa…
    I was also probably just another shy boy, who was concentrating more in communicating through writing. One addition to that was that at the time I felt the surroundings I grew up were somewhat rough. Writing, and the silent aim in it I told no one about, were that the better I will some day get in writing, the more I will have something of my own. Something that couldn’t be taken away from me in those rough surroundings.
    Still, I ended up studying other things first in college, but I soon realised I couldn’t escape what was in my heart. I switched to study communications, then continued with literature studies in university. While doing a career in journalism, I started writing book scripts. It was time. Also after seeing all kinds of people’s lives while working as a security guard during my years in uni. It all prepared me for this work.

     

    Which authors do you think have genuinely inspired you?

    The big influence for me already at very young was Finnish author Matti Yrjänä Joensuu and his writings. His Harjunpää detective series with its unique, touching language and humane way to depict life realistically were a big inspiration to me. Still are.

    Inside the crime genre, I’ve also been a big fan of Swedish writers Sjöwall-Wahlöö and their Beck series. When wanting to read a superb, smart crime novel, I go back to the fourth Beck novel, The Laughing Policeman. Another great example of inspiring structure for a crime novel is Swedish Håkan Nesser’s Hour of the Wolf. Truly inspiring.

    Outside the genre for other writings, authors such as Raymond Carver, Anton Chekhov, Harri Sirola, Jukka Pakkanen, Leena Lander, Mark Twain and Astrid Lindgren have inspired me very much.

     

    You have been successful in Nordic Noir to Children’s books, do you get a different satisfaction from writing each genre?

    Yes, I do. I read various genres of books and the same goes with writing. If the inspiration comes, it doesn’t always circulate around crimes and murders. Though at some point one TV producer looked through my script ideas and concluded: ”scripts don’t always have to include a murder”. So some kind of an attraction to the crime genre has always been there. But I get inspired well by other forms of art like movies and music or books. When watching The Thief of Bagdad (the 1940 version), I’d love to write a great fantasy story for children. Or when I watch one of my favourite films Cinema Paradiso, I do get inspired writing a melancholic love story. Also a variety of music does bring pictures in the head, bringing it to the need to write in different genres.
    Surely life in itself brings inspirational content with its reality to get the creative machine working to whatever genre it may be. I’m also a big fan of short stories myself. I’d love to write more of them. Great form of writing. Satisfaction from writing comes fast.

     

    Can you tell us a bit about the #1 best seller – Medusa and its protagonist Markku Isaksson.

    Medusa tells a story about several, hazy, staged-like murders, which are committed in a short time in Helsinki region in Finland. In their last days, victims have ended up in the middle of strange events. As if someone had wanted to rip them from their last pieces of sanity.
    It goes back to Helsinki and also the surroundings I grew up in Vantaa. Somehow depicting the rough atmosphere in the past and also today’s tougher work life and pressures in the society, including violent behaviour, bullying, toughening work life, strained relations, mental illnesses… Senior Crime Constable Markku Isaksson, who has recently moved back from a small town to the rough suburb he grew up, is investigating a perfect murder game.
    Isaksson is a humane thinker, who has not given up his humanity because of his rough past when young and other obstacles in his life such as being a caretaker of his dying father in his young adulthood. He tries to understand the often sad circumstances leading to crimes for some weaker, very much pressured people. At the same time he can’t stand those people, who just use others as stepping stones. Going through rough childhood in a concrete suburb has not made him numb with feelings. Just the opposite, as he has fought heavily not to become cynical or become a bully himself. Therefore he is more receptive to different feelings, such as his hunger for love, all the way that he is somehow vulnerable with it. During the Isaksson series, he eventually falls madly in love with his level-headed, humane and intelligent female colleague Nina Markkanen, his apparent female counterpart.

    Because of Isaksson’s past, and quiet resilient nature, he tends to walk things over in his long walks. He often stays up overnight with his papers and board drawings. Just to see the connections in investigations connect in his mind when the sun rises in the morning.

     

    What can readers expect from you over the next year and will Jäljet be available in English?

    Among other scripts I’ve been working on for a longer while, I’m right now concentrating on finishing the next Isaksson novel. I’ve played a script lottery. After deciding upon two partially written Isaksson scripts to finish, just the other one starting flowing smoothly. So I switched to that one. Natural selection, I believe. There are some partially written and several planned ones in the series. Hoping to get the first version well finished in the coming months.
    Hoping that in addition to the English e-version of Medusa, also Isaksson #2 Palava sydän (Burning Heart) and Isaksson #3 Jäljet (Tracks) and the follow-ups would some time get published in English. I get constantly queries from readers about these. But it’s not always up to me. I’m open to talks. We’ll see.

     

    You have lived in Ireland since 2006, what do you miss most about Finland?

    Family and friends and the magical summer. Luckily I get to go there once or twice a year to meet them. Usually for a bit longer time during the summer.
    When the summer in Finland is good, there’s nothing like it in the world. The nature with all its scents. Lakes, sea… Finns being cheerful after unwrapping themselves after the dark and harsh winter.
    The summer nights with the midnight sun. It’s magical when you get up at 3am and see the sun coming up slowly behind the horizon already. The short dark moment of the night in the south is over.
    Although, I do get inspired also by the September evening autumn air. When still in Finland, that pushed the button for the creative machine. Usually with a slight tone of melancholy, when the summer is over.

    Markusireland.wix.com

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    XX Mänttä Art Festival – Finland

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , , Leave a comment
  • 10th July 2015
  • manatta

    New Present To Open Up The Senses And Provoke Thought Since starting Nordophile we have been overwhelmed by the quality of art exhibitions, festivals and groups of people who are promoting and showcasing not only Nordic artists but the support these Nordic countries gives when welcoming international artists. We have come across XX Mänttä Art Festival – Finland […]




    New Present To Open Up The Senses And Provoke Thought

    Since starting Nordophile we have been overwhelmed by the quality of art exhibitions, festivals and groups of people who are promoting and showcasing not only Nordic artists but the support these Nordic countries gives when welcoming international artists.

    We have come across XX Mänttä Art Festival – Finland and are excited by the 2015 offering. 14th July- 31st August.

     

    manatta

     

    The curators of this summer’s Mänttä Art Festival, Kalle Hamm and Dzamil Kamanger, have invited to the exhibition an impressive sample of international artists working in Finland. At the festival, spatial, audio and video installations, as well as community art projects, take centre stage. The works of 43 artists and artist groups create a phenomenal whole that offers new perspectives on the world today.

    Sight is not the only sense required to enjoy this exhibition. Contemporary art is multisensory, multidisciplinary and thought-provoking. In this exhibition, artists also become commentators via the intervention of the Third Space collective.

     

    curators

     

    Many of the artworks create new spaces, lounges and miniature worlds inside the Pekilo Exhibition Hall. Karolina Kucia lets the exhibition guest take the place of a cockroach, shining a spotlight on the small and ignored. Carolina Sandell’s installation Collage of Time and Space is a glimpse into the life stages of a young person in different cities, apartments and time periods. The guests can immerse themselves in the world of senses, for example in Hilda Kozári’s fragrant room and inside Meri Linna’s installation, where the sense of sight is excluded altogether.

    The Library of Influential Books by Tellervo Kalleinen and Oliver Kochta-Kalleinen is comprised of books that have made an impact in the thinking of the hundred people representing a statistical sample of the entire population of Finland. The installation is based on their project, 101 For All, that will be reported in full next autumn at Kunsthalle Helsinki. Edwina Goldstone has transferred inside the exhibition space an entire barn that bears on its walls human faces and Karelian landscapes from old glass plate negatives.

    Ray Langenbach and David A.R. Ross invite the audience into a combined lounge and study, where they can listen to the amazing life story of Ross unwinding like a veritable thriller. Their work, Habeas Corpus, poses questions: Whose word is taken to be the truth and how is reality being manipulated? At the same time, the installation offers perspectives into the relations between Finland and the US, international crime and child trafficking.

    Politics and scrutiny of the past are also heavily present in the NÆS group’s installation The Trace (Exercise no. 3), examining the emergence of the Finnish welfare state, and in Diego Bruno’s video installation, Galindez, tackling Argentina’s history and different forms of torture.

     

    manatta

     

    The exhibition takes us from the countryside into the city and from the nature and the earth all the way into outer space. The artist group Ore.e Refineries has brought bales of hay indoors and compiled the Trans-Horse Anthology, a critical review of modern Finnish equestrian culture. On June 5th, the group rode their horses from Keuruu to Mänttä, travelling the 50-kilometre journey in 10-plus hours. During the summer, the group will organize events such as carriage rides and assisted riding.

    The focus of Egle Oddo’s installation performance, Word for Freedom, is a towering sculpture of a bud holding seeds of various plants within. During the Mänttä Music Festival, an event combining theatre, performance art and music will take place around the sculpture. Shinji Kanki’s solar-powered sound installation Music for Flowers in a White Round Tea House captures the hearing with white noise, establishing a connection with the universe.

    This summer, Taavetinsaari Island next to the Joenniemi Manor is transformed into Isle of the Dead. The guests can reflect on the cycles of nature and life by the sculptures of William Dennisuk and the wind chimes of Mark Mitchell. Hill of Crosses by Pira Cousin is a memorial grove in the form of an installation. The audience is invited to participate in building and expanding it by making memorial crosses for their loved ones.

     

    mantta3Ahsan Masood: Lori (Lullaby), still from video, 2013

     

    In the Mänttä town centre, various communities are given a voice. During the summer, the Town Hall of Mänttä- Vilppula is taken over by cleaners who, via Martta Tuomaala’s video documentation, speak of the harsh treatment of their profession in Finland. Social Landscapes by Jyri Pitkänen spreads out into the cafés and restaurants of the centre, presenting the values of the surrounding businesses. The Mänttä Library will also present Pitkänen’s video art made together with the Omapolku group. The townscape also includes Kölnsinki by Yvapurü Samaniego, a series of tape art commenting on advertising imagery.

    The artworks of XX Mänttä Art Festival come together to create a network of friendship, where different cultures and eras, seriousness, lightheartedness and outspokenness meet, enter into fluent dialogues and intertwine with each other.

     

    harrieliveart

    2015 Artist Harrie Liveart  harrieliveart.com

    XX Mänttä Art Festival
    14 June – 31 August, 2015
    Open Every Day, including Midsummer, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. www.mantankuvataideviikot.fi

    Further Details:
    Kalle Hamm and Dzamil Kamanger, Curators hamm.kamanger@gmail.com

    Elissa Määttänen, Press and Exhibition Secretary 044 023 4587, kuvataideviikot.tiedottaja@gmail.com

    Tiina Nyrhinen, Executive Director
    044 259 9194, kuvataideviikot@gmail.com

     

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    Chelsea Music Festival – New York

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , Leave a comment
  • 16th June 2015
  • olavi

    The 2015 Chelsea Music Festival will celebrate Finland and Hungary with over 2 dozen performances in a wide range of venues throughout Manhattan. Events include evening concerts with music ranging from baroque to Jazz, Saturday morning Family Events, Late Night events, and daytime Open-Air events that will include Finnish Tango and Hungarian Dances.     […]




    The 2015 Chelsea Music Festival will celebrate Finland and Hungary with over 2 dozen performances in a wide range of venues throughout Manhattan. Events include evening concerts with music ranging from baroque to Jazz, Saturday morning Family Events, Late Night events, and daytime Open-Air events that will include Finnish Tango and Hungarian Dances.

     

    chelsea music festival

     

    June 12-20, 2015 in New York City, over two dozen events will be held in a wide range of venues throughout Manhattan. Program highlights will include reflections and collaborations on the life and music of Jean Sibelius to celebrate his 150th birthday, as well as the music of Bartók, Kodaly, Rautavaara and Bach. The Festival will once again present world and New York premieres, original Jazz arrangements, as well as evening and late night expeditions that will complete historical and present-day portraits of Finland and Hungary. Events include evening concerts with music ranging from baroque to Jazz, Saturday morning Family Events that give children a chance to Hear | Taste | See Finland and Hungary, Late Night events and daytime Open Air events featuring Finnish Tango and Hungarian Dances. • Avanti! | Ensemble-in-Residence (Finland) • Ilari Kaila | Composer-in-Residence (Finland) • Sami Tallberg & Carl Frederiksen | Culinary Artists-in-Residence (Finland & Denmark) • Rachel Mica Weiss | Visual Artist-in-Residence (USA) As in seasons past, the Festival has assembled a noteworthy roster of over 75 artists, including 2015 Festival Ensemble-in-Residence Avanti! from Finland and leading contemporary Finnish composers such as Ilari Kaila and Uljas Pulkkis; the Tapiola Chamber Choir; the stage play Sibelius & Ida in its U.S. premiere; the Jazz ensemble Tuomo Uusitalo Trio; Hungarian/Canadian composer Kati Agócs and ensembles including the Loop Doctors and the Gőz-Kurtág-Lukács Trio. Star chefs from Finland, Hungary and Denmark including Carl Frederiksen and Sami Tallberg will surprise the audience with their special culinary creations honoring the 150th anniversaries of Nielsen.

     

    The program includes some very special musicians. The motto is Hear/Taste/See and all of your senses will definitely be alerted.

     

    Voices of Finland: The Tapiola Chamber Choir in New York

     

    tapiola

     

    One of Europe’s most celebrated choirs, the Tapiola Chamber Choir, will perform at the 2015 Chelsea Music Festival as part of its first ever North American tour. This evening will be a rare a cappella listening experience of lesser-known Finnish choral works as well as songs by Jean Sibelius, as no other choir truly can. Tapiola’s recordings of Penderecki and Sibelius are included as “benchmark” recordings in the Gramophone Classical Good CD Guide. A chance to revel in the beauty and distinct sounds of the Finnish language and song.

    www.tapiolachamberchoir.squarespace.com

    Works by Fougstedt, Johansson, Kokkonen, Kostiainen, Kuula, Madetoja, Makaroff, Mäntyjärvi, Merikanto, Palmgren, Rautavaara, and Sibelius.

    Friday, June 19 7:30pm | St. Paul’s German Lutheran Church | 315 West 22nd Street | $35 ($55 combo for both evening events)

     

    Festival Jazz FINNale – the Tuomo Uusitalo Trio

     

    Tuomo

     

    “Since releasing his award-winning debut album “TRIO” in 2012, Finnish jazz pianist Tuomo Uusitalo is taking NYC jazz scene by storm. He will be joined by American bassist Myles Sloniker and Finnish drummer sensation Olavi Louhivuori to close the 2015 Festival with original compositions and inspired arrangements. A tasting menu of wild, foraged Finnish cuisine curated by master Chef Sami Talberg will follow as the 2015 Chelsea Music Festival out its celebration of the great musical, artistic and culinary heritage of Finland.

    www.tuomouusitalo.com

    Saturday, June 20 7:30pm | St. Paul’s German Lutheran Church | 315 West 22nd Street | $68 | Curated Gala Reception

    Olavi Louhivuori, Percussion. Tuomo Uusitalo Trio

     olavi

     

    In 2002 Olavi moved to Helsinki to study under Jukkis Uotila at the Sibelius Academy and quickly began working full-time in Finland and internationally. He won the Young Nordic Jazz Groups competition three times: in 2000 with the Joona ToivanenTrio, in 2002 with the Ilmiliekki Quartet, and in 2006 with the Sun Trio. Olavi tours internationally with the Tomasz Stanko Quintet and has performed with artists and groups such as Lee Konitz, Anthony Braxton, Marilyn Crispell, Susanne Abbuehl, theFinnish Umo Jazz Orchestra, and Piirpauke.

    http://www.olavilouhivuori.com

     

    Avanti!

     

    avanti!

     

    Avanti! Chamber Orchestra was founded in 1983 by Esa-Pekka Salonen, Olli Pohjola, and Jukka-Pekka Saraste. Clarinetist Kari Kriikku has served as its Artistic Director since 1998. In manifestations ranging from a single player to an entire symphony orchestra, Avanti! operates across multiple eras and genres with a particular emphasis on contemporary music. They work in close partnership with front-line international conductors, soloists, and composers such as Oliver Knussen, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Kaija Saariaho, Susanna Mälkki, Emanuel Ax, John Storgårds, Hannu Lintu, Barbara Hannigan, Pekka Kuusisto, Matthias Pintscher, Uri Caine, and Django Bates.The winner of numerous prizes and acclaimed by audiences and critics alike, Avanti! is a major presence on the Finnish music scene. The ensemble runs a concert series in its home city of Helsinki and tours regularly around the world. It has released recordings on the Alba, BIS, Ondine, and other labels. Avanti! debuted its annual music festival in 1986. Each year it focuses on a living international guest composer, thus forging a link with contemporary music and winning it an established place among Finland’s unique summer festivals.

    To find out more visit www.chelseamusicfestival2015.org
    Olavi Louhivuori, photo by Tero Ahonen
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    Janne Kyttanen

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , Leave a comment
  • 12th June 2015
  • Janne-Kyttanen

    Nordophile features Janne Kyttanen during a very busy period for him as he prepares for Design Miami/Basel We have excitedly followed his exhibitions, concepts, and designs. His work highlights how the specific visualisation many Nordic artists have, is something which is very much in demand around the world right now. Janne Kyttanen (born March 13, 1974) […]




    Nordophile features Janne Kyttanen during a very busy period for him as he prepares for Design Miami/Basel

    We have excitedly followed his exhibitions, concepts, and designs. His work highlights how the specific visualisation many Nordic artists have, is something which is very much in demand around the world right now.

    Janne Kyttanen (born March 13, 1974) is a Finnish designer and conceptual artist, best known for his pioneering work with design for 3D printing.

     

    Janne-Kyttanen

     

     

    Janne Kyttanen was born in Hameenlinna, Finland. He commenced his design studies at the Escola De Disseny, Elisave in Barcelona in 1996, before moving to the Netherlands and graduating from The Gerrit Rietveld Academy in the year 2000. During his studies, Kyttanen discovered 3D printing and envisioned a future in which products would be scaled down into digital files, their distribution becoming as simple as downloading music from the internet. Kyttanen’s vision for the future of 3D printing was so clear that he decided to focus solely on creating products using digital technologies.

     

    16731800893_0642601e09_h

     

    In the year 2000, Kyttanen founded Freedom of Creation, a pioneering agency specializing in design for 3D printing. Leading a team of design and innovation experts, Kyttanen created a portfolio of acclaimed and awarded designs for the Freedom of Creation brand. Notably, Kyttanen was the first designer to commercialize high volume 3D printed products including creating the world’s first 3D printed lights, shoes and gradient structures. In collaboration with Jiri Evenhuis, Kyttanen made the world’s first fully functional 3D printed dress in the year 2000. In collaboration with Freshfiber Kyttanen created the Macedonia smartphone case in 2010 – this product was the highest selling 3D printed consumer product to date at the conclusion of 2010. Kyttanen has several patents pending, covering pioneering designs.

     

    8400324888_644732e040_h

    Kyttanen’s work has been extensively exhibited and integrated into permanent design collections at leading galleries and museums around the world. Such museum collections include MOMA, FIT, MAD and the Vitra Design Museum. In 2011 Freedom of Creation BV was acquired by 3D Systems Corporation, providing Kyttanen with access to the world’s most innovative, cutting edge software, materials and technology. Kyttanen has designed award winning 3D printers for 3D Systems including the Cube ® which has won a variety of awards including the American Technology Award (ATA) for outstanding achievement in Technology Manufacturing and Japan’s prestigious Good Design Award in 2013. Kyttanen is now Creative Director for 3D Systems, the largest specialized 3D printing company in the world.

     

    8399139835_e8956b7dbd_h

     

    SELECTED AWARDS

    Best New Comer Award 100% Design, 2003

    Best New Exhibitor Award 100% Design, 2005

    Red Dot Design winner, Lily.MGX lamp, 2005

    Interior Innovation Award Cologne, 2006

    Young Designer of the Year, Finland Forum, 2007

    Cristal International, Best Cyber/Viral (ASICS Sportstyle Left/Right campaign), 2009

    EuroBest, Best use of social media – Bronze (ASICS Sportstyle Left/Right campaign), 2009

    ADCN, Integrated – Silver (Onitsuka Tiger/Electric Tigerland campaign), 2009

    Meribel Ad Festival, Integrated – Crystal award(Onitsuka Tiger/Electric Tigerland campaign), 2008

     

    13097210465_2d9ebb14fa_h

     

    You can see more about Janne and his up-coming events at www.JanneKyttanen.com

    www.designmiami.com

     

     

     

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    Nordic Contemporary in Paris

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
  • 2nd June 2015
  • nc space

    Nordic Contemporary Art Space proudly presents “Too much of a Good Thing” A group exhibition by artists from Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland. Exhibition period: 28. MAY – 7. JUNE 2015 The artist/curator Andreas Emenius and cultural entrepreneur Jacob Valdemar introduce with Nordic Contemporary the exhibition ‘TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING’, showing ten contem- […]




    Nordic Contemporary Art Space proudly presents “Too much of a Good Thing”
    A group exhibition by artists from Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland.
    Exhibition period: 28. MAY – 7. JUNE 2015

    The artist/curator Andreas Emenius and cultural entrepreneur Jacob Valdemar introduce with
    Nordic Contemporary the exhibition ‘TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING’, showing ten contem-
    porary Nordic artists presenting new interpretations of paintings, sculptures, drawings and video.
    Apart from being connected geographically, the invited artists are also connected by an interest in
    high culture meets low culture, polished meets raw, natural meets clinical.

    nordic-contemporary

    The Nordic region is a stage where the beautiful life is acted out, resulting in a growing distance
    to the living life. “TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING” is an exhibition about how we exist in this
    condition. Not necessarily to reflect on it, but to work on it from within, looking out. Many of the
    artworks represented are satisfied with pointing back at the work itself, rather than a certain
    discourse, while pointing towards a freedom and subjectivity, with an existential commitment to the
    material.
    The titles reference ‘a good thing’ as being something utopian, while ‘too much’ stands for some
    thing over saturated, to the limit and beyond: mental states, material, and media. The artists are
    represented in a broad range of expressions as an attempt to break down hierarchies. High culture
    meets low culture, polished meets raw, natural meets clinical in an eclectic brew that aims to clash more than harmonise; yet somehow linked through the artists view.

    nordicC2

    Nordic Contemporary is an art space founded in 2014 by Andreas Emenius and Jacob
    Valdemar, situated on 160m2 in an empty apartment at Republique, Paris. It serves as a platform
    for contemporary art by Scandinavian artists, established and less established and presents
    three exhibitions a year aiming to visualize any current direction of Nordic art today. The aim is to
    create long-term visibility for Nordic art and showcase internationally the Nordic region’s increasing
    importance on the global art scene.

    The last exhibition at Nordic Contemporary, FLUID FLESH, opened Oct. 23, 2014. Attended by
    400 people it created an instant impact and was covered in national and international press,
    among others the New York Times and Purple magazine.

    NordicC3

    Curator/Artist
    Andreas Emenius

    Creates semi-figurative paintings, drawings and hulking
    figures in plaster, wood and iron, as well as suggestive videos, often composed
    together in a total installation, activated by a live performance. He indirectly
    draws from his personal background and history while observing people in his
    nearby surroundings. His figures appear in motion, restless at the same time
    positioned in place, full of brute emotive power. His interest lies in the effect
    the modern world has on the body, both in a cognitive and physical sense and,
    where he imagines an aesthetic chaos, due to the temporary body in constant

    Collaboration is a key aspect of his praxis and being the curator at
    Nordic contemporary is the latest in what creates a cluster of connections
    to his artist centre – the studio.
    Emenius is a founding member of Vibskov&Emenius, together with the Danish
    designer Henrik Vibskov. ‘The Fringe Projects’ and ‘The Circular Series’
    fifteen works in form of installations, objects, performances, video and self-
    potraits has been presented widely internationally since 2007 and documented
    in ‘The Fringe Projects 1-10’ (144p JapSam Books, 2009).

    Other collaborations include the Danish musician Trentemøller, EMENIUS
    directed and filmed two videos for ‘Decieve’ and ‘Come Undone
    Trentemøller remix’. (2014), as well being involved in the stage scenography for
    Trentemøller’s ongoing ‘Lost’ world tour. In return, Trentemøller was invited
    to perform in Emenius’s exhibition ‘Movement’ at H.C Andersen Castle,
    Copenhagen (2012), supported by Mercedes Benz and staged and curated by Andreas Emenius, international artists in dialogues across the fields of fine art, dance, performance and music.

     nc space

    The Director
    Jacob Valdemar

    Has education in Cultural Entrepreneurship and Leadership
    (KaosPilot, Denmark). Since then he has successfully initiated and led many
    fashion and music related projects.

    Being the business drive behind different artists and projects, Jacob has helped
    to grow them into cultural movements and cementing them as milestones in
    their time and context. Working with ideas that stand out and make a change
    in the world has always been a key factor in his projects.
    At the start of his career, Valdemar founded the internationally acclaimed
    RECession festival for experimental rock and electronical music in Aarhus,
    Denmark, featuring artists as The Fall, Cold Cut, Asian Dub Foundation and
    Einstürzende Neubauten. Later he was part of FreeMuse organization against
    music censorship, making opinions of artists like The Cure and Natacha Atlas
    heard.

    In 2003 he moved to Berlin and launched the business of a young South
    African designer by positioning his work at high end European stores. This
    received broad attention on international scale in both business and media
    environments by being featured in such respectable channels as CNN, Dazed
    and Confused and Danish Berlingske Tidne.
    In 2004 he founded Sales and PR company “Agency V”. Based in Berlin,
    the agency’s clients included such at the time emerging designers as Henrik
    Vibskov, Wood Wood and others. From 2008 to 2012 Jacob worked with
    Henrik Vibskov as his partner in business development, including opening
    Henrik Vibskov retail stores and launching the fragrance line TYPE.

    In 2013 Jacob opened Sales and Marketing company VALD agency, which
    today provides it’s services to 14 international designers, including Danish
    Henrik Vibskov, Anne Sofie Madsen, Asger Juel Larsen, American Eckhaus
    Latta, 69, and other designers from Germany, France, Austria and Korea.
    Initiating Nordic Contemporary project
    Jacob Valdemar uses his global network to elevate the Nordic art by
    providing the artists from the region with international platform through which
    to connect with world leading art collectors and culture media

    We look forward to hearing from you.
    Nordic Contemporary
    Address: Nordic Contemporary, 14, rue du Chateau d’Eau, 75010 Paris/France
    For further information please contact: T. +33 954 108 321 · info@nordiccontemporary.com
    www.nordiccontemporary.com

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    Liverpool International Nordic Community

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , , , , , Leave a comment
  • 1st June 2015
  • candles

    We have come across a Nordic community in Liverpool, who seem to be extremely active in the local community. This would be a perfect place to embrace Nordic culture and make friends. But just where did the concept for this Nordic hub in Liverpool come from? The decision to establish a religious mission in Liverpool, […]




    We have come across a Nordic community in Liverpool, who seem to be extremely active in the local community. This would be a perfect place to embrace Nordic culture and make friends.

    But just where did the concept for this Nordic hub in Liverpool come from?

    The decision to establish a religious mission in Liverpool, in order to meet the pastoral needs of Scandinavian seamen and the growing number of emigrants on their way to North America and other overseas destinations, was the result of a recommendation by the Swedish Norwegian Church Council in London, where a mission had already been established by the Evangelical Patriotic Foundation (Evangeliska Fosterlands-Stiftelsen) in 1862.

    The first priest, Per August Tegner, arrived in Liverpool on 22 August 1870 and the first service was held six days later at South Bethel.

    liverpool-nordic-church

    The Liverpool International Nordic Community Cultural and Social Centre
    Gustaf Adolfs Kyrka in Park Lane Liverpool

    The connection between the Port of Liverpool, trade with the Baltic regions and Scandinavian seamen is deeply etched into Liverpool’s economic and cultural history. When you walk up Park Lane from the bustling shops of Liverpool One, you can’t fail to notice on your right an imposing Neo-Gothic brick building. Gustaf Adolf’s Kyrka, was completed in 1884 specifically as a place of worship and sanctuary initially for Scandinavian seamen and later extended to the thousands of emigrants from Scandinavian countries on their way to the ‘New World’. Before that, ministers had to visit boarding houses, or hop from ship to ship to provide worship and spiritual sustenance.
    This much-loved and cherished building, so long part of Liverpool’s Baltic Triangle, remains today as the heart of the Nordic Community in and beyond Merseyside.

    Liverpool international Nordic Community Charity Company (LiNC)

    Today, the building has a more varied range of activities than was the case as recently as 10 years ago, when it became the home of LiNC. The charity has a modern wide set of objectives to meet the needs of anyone connected to, or interested in, Nordic cultural and social activities.
    On certain days of the week, there is a buzz of activity — coffee mornings, knitting and crafts, language classes, music gigs, film club, cultural events, and, for a small charge, guests can stay overnight. Everyone speaks English of course. But you will also hear Norwegian, Swedish, Danish and Finnish languages spoken, and on festive occasions like Jul (Christmas), Midsommar, Lucia (Festival of Light) and on Nordic National Days, you will also see a sprinkling of colourful national costumes.

    christmas decorations

    Gustaf Adolf Nordic Congregation Company (GANC)

    After the departure of the Church of Sweden in 2008, the building was renamed the Nordic Church. The members of the congregation have set up the Gustaf Adolf Nordic Congregation Company and have joined the Lutheran Church in Great Britain. Through the Porvoo agreement, the Lutheran church is now affiliated with the Anglican Church in Great Britain. The congregation holds regular acts of worship. Everyone is welcome to join the congregation. Just click on Church Services to view the programme. Occupying the top floor of the building, the church, with blue painted pews and soft lighting, has a distinct maritime feel and is an oasis of perfect calm.
    Managed by LiNC, everyone is welcome to attend events at the Nordic Church. Why not find out what is on and join us?
    Under the tabs you will find membership forms for LiNC, the Congregation Company and more information on our activities.

     candles

    Can you help beat a Guiness World Record?

    As part of Liverpool’s One Magnificent City celebration on SATURDAY 4th JULY, starting at 4pm, there will be a
    VERY BIG CATWALK taking place at THE LIVERPOOL PIERHEAD.

    This is an attempt to beat the Guinness World Record for the most models on a catwalk, currently held by Mexico City.
    The Nordic Church (LiNC) has been asked to take part. To do this, we need to form a group of at least 25 men, women and children willing to wear national dress, lucia outfits, Nordic knits or carry flags.

    To take part you must be committed to attend a rehearsal on SUNDAY 28th JUNE, 3pm and the actual event, SATURDAY 4th JULY.

    It will be great fun- a chance to strut our stuff- and afterwards, if you want, you can stay on for an open air disco and the departure of the Queen Mary 2.

    Just say yes and email Sylvia at sycy83@hotmail.com or Stan at stan.royden@hotmail.co.uk

    http://nordicliverpool.co.uk/

    Liverpool international Nordic Community Charity Company Ltd is a registered charity company.
    (Registration 8351592 and charity registration 1152041)
    LiNC Operations Company Ltd (Registration 8748865)
    Gustaf Adolf Nordic Congregation Company (Registration 7034654)
    Head offices: Gustaf Adolf Church, 138 Park Lane, Liverpool L1 8HG.

    photo credit; Markus Spiske raumrot.com

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