Ultima – Oslo Contemporary Music Festival

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 7th September 2015
  • ClariNord-4-c-Jie-Yang-467x700

    Ultima – Oslo Contemporary Music Festival takes place September 10-19. This is a fascinating festival which we thoroughly recommend as it takes us through a celebration of music through collaborations, talks, commissions, exhibitions, improvised performances and of course music from every corner of genres. Held in Oslo this is the perfect opportunity for a Nordophile to […]




    Ultima – Oslo Contemporary Music Festival takes place September 10-19. This is a fascinating festival which we thoroughly recommend as it takes us through a celebration of music through collaborations, talks, commissions, exhibitions, improvised performances and of course music from every corner of genres.

    Held in Oslo this is the perfect opportunity for a Nordophile to explore this cultural mecca of a Nordic city and immerse in the music culture through the festival.

     

     

    Rikksscenen

     

    About

    Ultima is the premiere contemporary music festival in the Nordic region. The festival became a designated “knutepunkt” (cultural hub) in 2006 and is supported by the Ministry of Culture and Church Affairs and Oslo City Council. Ultima is a foundation with 17 members, all of them professional cultural institutions or organisations.

    The festival takes place during September and is staged at venues all around Oslo. Our events are staged both in large, established venues such as the Norwegian National Opera & Ballet, Oslo Concert Hall and the University of Oslo’s Great Hall as well as in small clubs, shop premises, industrial premises, museums, schools and outdoors.

    The Ultima Festival aims to promote artistic distinctiveness, trends and innovation and to make music of a high artistic standard accessible by everyone.

    His Royal Highness Crown Prince Haakon is the patron of Ultima.

     

    Featured Events

     

     

    Below are just a few of some of the events which are taking place. Head over to the Ultima website to find out about the other events which are taking place at the festival.

     

    Elisabeth Vatn: The color Beneath.

    Ekeberg park 6.30pm, September 10th

     

     

    Exclusive sunrise and sunset concerts with Elisabeth Vatn in James Turrell’s light installations in Ekeberg sculpture park.

    The Color Beneath by musician and composer ELISABETH VATN was conceived in James Turrell’s light installations in the old water reservoir on Ekeberg. Between 10–13 September, Vatn (harmonium, Meråker clarinet, bagpipes) performs withANDERS RØINE (langeleik, mouth harp, violin).

    Contemporary artist JAMES TURRELL works with perception, colour, light and space. The two location-specific works Ganzfeld: Double Vision and Skyspace: The Color Beneath were both created for the old water reservoir in 2013. While Ganzfeldexplores the way colours affect our senses, Skyspace makes use of the chromatic interaction between the concert space and the sky at dawn and dusk.

    In The Color Beneath the composer and performer turn their encounter with the installation into music, partly following the composition and partly through improvisation. Consequently, none of the concerts performed in this unique setting will be identical.

    The Color Beneath album was recorded during autumn 2014 and is released during Ultima 2015. The concerts are staged in cooperation with nyMusikk, Ekebergparken and Grappa Musikkforlag with contributions by Fond for Utøvende Kunstnere.

     

    Teknisk Museum, 10 AM

    Installation throughout festival

     

     

    ‘We are so used to seeing that suddenly we forgot how to look, so used to hearing that suddenly we forgot to listen.’

    Every movement we see in nature can be perceived as a visual concert, like a storm of birds moving together making astonishing patterns, or snow falling from the sky and touching the ground.Quintetto is based on the study of casual movement of objects or living creatures used as input for the production of sounds. The basic concept is to reveal what the ‘invisible concerts’ of everyday life. In this installation, the scene is five aquariums with a goldfish in each. The movement of the five fishes is captured by a video camera that translates their movements in digital sound signals/music in real time.

     

    Den Norske Opera & Ballett, Provesalen.

    MATTHEW SHLOMOWITZ: LECTURE ABOUT BAD MUSIC (WP)  ALEXANDER SCHUBERT: SENSATE FOCUS  September 11th 5pm

     

     

    Can music really be bad in itself or is ‘bad’ really nothing other than a subjective opinion?

    That is the question MATTHEW SHLOMOWITZ asks in Lecture About Bad Music, which was specially composed for the Anglo-Belgian octet. The work, which was written for lecturer, clarinet, electric guitar, synthesiser and violin, has been commissioned by Ultima and will receive its debut performance here. Australian-born Shlomowitz draws on elements from many fields and genres, employing musical demonstrations and recreations of psychological experiments to examine differences between musical experience and musical material.

    ALEXANDER SCHUBERT‘s Sensate Focus combines light and image, allowing lighting effects take on the role of a fifth performer to a quartet of musicians. In the work, Schubert, who studied bioinformatics, experiments with the interfaces between gesticular movements and musical sounds, where the performers’ physical movements and position in the room are essential elements of the composition.

    PLUS MINUS ENSEMBLE specialises in new music and modern key works. It is particularly known for its interest in avant-garde, experimental and conceptual music, such as Stockhausen’s seminal work from 1963, from which the ensemble takes its name.

     

    OCA (Office for Contemporary Art)

    September 13th 6.pm PRE-TALK AT OCA 5PM. INTRODUCTION BY KATYA GARCÍA-ANTÓN, DIRECTOR OF OCA.

     

     

    CAMILLE NORMENT, who is Norway’s entry to the 56th Venice Biennale, began her collaboration with composer and writer DAVID TOOP at Café OTO in London in 2014. The collaboration resulted in a performance at the Biennale. The performance explores the legends, stories and mysteries of the depth of the oceans through sound. It is still being continually developed, and will be performed at Ultima in September.

    The Oslo-based American artist CAMILLE NORMENT’S practice includes performance, installation, drawing and sound. She explores how the body is interconnected with its environment through sound, and contemplates on the power of dissonance to create spaces for new ways of thinking. DAVID TOOP is a British composer, writer and professor of Audio Culture and Improvisation at the London College of Communication. The third edition of his debut book, Rap Attack, has just been released. He has recorded five solo albums since he released Ocean of Sound in 1995.

    In cooperation with nyMusikk and the Office for Contemporary Art Norway.

     

    Black Box Teater; Annie Dorsen – Yesterday Tomorrow

    September 18th, 7pm & September 19th, 6pm

     

     

    AN EVOLUTIONARY MUSICAL

    Annie Dorsen’s Yesterday Tomorrow is a musical that breaks most of the rules for this genre. Unlike traditional musicals, the music for this musical is created during the course of the performance with the help of computer-generated algorithms, which means that the final result is different every time. The only points of reference are the two well-known songs Yesterday by The Beatles andTomorrow from the musical Annie.

    Based on evolutionary processes such as mutation and natural selection, the algorithms determine the most appropriate route from the first song to the next, or from what has passed to what is to come. As a result, the performance stands as an expression of the unpredictable nature of the present, as a contrast to a familiar past and the notion of a happy future. The music is performed by three singers who continually receive information about which rhythm, pitch and lyrics to sing. The result is an intelligent, humorous yet disturbing encounter between man and machine.

    Annie Dorsen has previously work in film, dance and theatre, and in recent years has been particularly interested in artificial intelligence and digital performance. The Yesterday Tomorrowproject was developed in cooperation with Pierre Godard and Greg Bellar from the Institute for Research and Coordination in Acoustics/Music (IRCAM.).

    Concept, direction: Annie Dorsen. Music director: Joanna Bailie. Algorithm design: Pierre Godard. Sound design: Greg Beller. Video systems design: Ryan Holsopple. Lighting design and technical direction: Bruno Pocheron, Ruth Waldeyer. Producer: Alexandra Rosenberg. Performers: Hai-Ting Chinn, Jeffrey Gavett & Natalie Raybould. Coproduction: Holland Festival, Black Box Teater, Performance Space 122, La Villette – Résidences d’Artistes 2015, L’Hippodrome, scène nationale de Douai, Théâtre de Gennevilliers with Festival d’automne à Paris, Le Maillon-Wacken – Scene européenne – Strasbourg, théâtre Garonne – Scène européenne – Toulouse. Supported by: Mount Tremper Arts, Abrons Arts Center, New York State Council on the Arts.

     

    CEO & Artistic Director – Lars Pettern Hagen

     

     

    “The board appreciates that Lars Petter Hagen will continue to manage the festival for another three years,” says Stein Gullberg, Chairman of the Board. “Mr. Hagen has brought an innovative spirit to the festival program and steered its administrative advancement with a steady hand. Public attendance is on a rise, and Ultima is meeting with ever growing international attention. It’s important to make the best use of this potential, which is best served by the continuity we achieve by extending this appointment. Lars Petter Hagen’s extensive network as well as the fact that he is held in esteem by a broad music and art environment, both within Norway and internationally.”

    Lars Petter Hagen has accepted the offer. “Oslo is a fabulous music town in constant growth, making the Ultima Festival one of the most exciting places to work in the whole world right now. I look forward to another three years with unpredictable musical encounters, dialog with the public and artists, good colleagues and partners,” he says.

     

    Ultima Academy

     

     

    How does art affect nature? How does nature affect art? For its 2015 edition, Ultima Academy invites scientists, music researchers and artists to talk about nature and discuss our attitude to it.

    Head over to Ultima.no to read more about the collaborations and what you can expect to see!

    Special thanks to Ultima for text and photos.

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    Kunsthal Aarhus – DUMP!

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 23rd August 2015
  • 1536

    Nordophile is constantly searching for Nordic art centres/projects and festivals who work tirelessly to promote and showcase art, artists and their efforts to promote thought through their work. The collaborations that we have brought you all have a dedication to the art, fully. Sometimes unstructured, sometimes unrestrained but always fully committed. We encourage Nordophiles to combine their Nordic […]




    Nordophile is constantly searching for Nordic art centres/projects and festivals who work tirelessly to promote and showcase art, artists and their efforts to promote thought through their work. The collaborations that we have brought you all have a dedication to the art, fully. Sometimes unstructured, sometimes unrestrained but always fully committed. We encourage Nordophiles to combine their Nordic travels with some of these art exhibitions and festivals so you fully appreciate being in and part of the Nordics.

    Nordophile have come across Kunsthal Aarhus which is a contemporary art centre located at the heart of the city of Aarhus, Denmark: cutting edge art, landmark architecture, intimate atmosphere.

     

    Ny "løbebane"
    Ny “løbebane”

     

    The institution initiates, commissions, produces and presents art at an international level to local, regional, and international audiences. Kunsthal Aarhus creates art in a broad context, connected to other fields of human activity, other disciplines, and to a wider society as part of a sustainable approach.

    It provides a research-based participatory, collaborative and transdisciplinary platform for artistic experimentation and critical engagement. Kunsthal Aarhus strives to be an inclusive, transparent, dynamic and flexible institution that fosters the culture of appreciation and values diversity of contributions.

     

    Shaped Canvas Track

    Come and try Kunsthal Aarhus’ running track.

    Shaped Canvas Track is designed by the Dutch artist/designer duo Jeroen Bouweriks & Linda Beumer and was selected from a Call for Ideas in the summer of 2013. The selected project is inspired by the American minimalist icon Frank Stella and the Danish middle distance runner Wilson Kipketer, and in this way it combines art and sport.

    With its red rubber surface the track is perfect for a 50 metre sprint from the J.M. Mørks Gade street to Kunsthal Aarhus’ new entrance. The stripes of the track wrap around the old building becoming a hybrid between landscape architecture, sport, design and art.

    This fascinates City Architect from Aarhus Municipality, Stephen Willacy:
    “The selected team has created a very inspiring project. They have been able to create a temporary artwork, which guides the visitors with humour and clear design, but also respects the existing architecture.”

    The artists, Jeroen Bouweriks & Linda Beumer say:
    “We believe in the unexpected combination of disciplines, and that this can result in interesting dynamics. The idea of walking, running with a certain goal – in this case to the entrance – can become a game or a challenge. Why not facilitate this motion with an unusual track in a contemporary art context. It’s the mixture of these two worlds that can appeal to different kind of visitors.”

    Lars Nielsen, Chief Coach for the National Athletics team who has been a consultant on Shaped Canvas Track explains his interest in the project:
    “It combines sports and arts, and for me these are two elements with a lot in common. Both demand the same to get you to the top level, and that is commitment. You have to think in new ways, seek inspiration and make use of other people’s ideas.”

    The project marks the start of the new phase of the transformation of Kunsthal Aarhus, connecting the development of its new artistic profile with its architectural features:
”With this project we are rethinking the idea of the future art institution, and how to transform Kunsthal Aarhus into a more open and accessible institution that is connected to the wider world. Imagine if people will literally be able to run in and out of Kunsthal Aarhus and merge the experience of the art programme inside with the outside” – add Joasia Krysa, Artistic Director and Iben Hofstede, Administrative Director of Kunsthal Aarhus.

    Shaped Canvas Track can be experienced until 2017 and is the first commissioned art project in Kunsthal Aarhus’ new public programme “Museum Without Walls” (2015-2017) comprising of a series of new artworks developed specifically for urban context and participatory projects developed through social media.

     

    Current Exhibition

    DUMP! 26.June.2015-20 Sept.2015

    Collective Making series at Kunsthal Aarhus presents a new exhibition curated by Elaine Gan, Steven Lam and Sarah Lookofsky.

    DUMP! gathers together artists, scientists and organisms to explore multispecies collaboration that reshapes the ruins of modernity and resists industrialized progress. Contesting the celebratory logics of invention and making that dominate contemporary discourse, DUMP! creates an arena for waste, obsolescence, and decomposition, where practices of nurturing and collective cultivation may begin, turning composts to compositions.

     

     

    DUMP! upends the division between nature and culture, while refusing separations between art and science; the art institution and the natural history museum; and wonder and comprehension. By presenting creations of humans and nonhumans alike, DUMP! calls out for new ways of seeing, describing, making, and living in unruly entanglement within contaminated worlds.

    Inspired by Lucy Lippard, a self-described “compiler” of exhibitions, and taking its cue from garbage heaps – and the multispecies life that ferments and flourishes in them – the exhibition will continue to grow throughout its duration.

    The exhibition is sited in and between two locations: Kunsthal Aarhus and Søby Brunkulslejerne – a post-mining landscape of contamination, garbage, and unruly multispecies transformation. Both places will host projects, proposals, artifacts, and concepts compiled along two strands of overlapping inquiry that constitute the DNA and organizing principles of the show:

     

     

    Unmaking Making:
    There is a utopian and almost naive celebration of the creative maker in this era of crisis and extinction – a heroic figure invoked as alibi for economic recovery and sustainability by policymakers and governments. DUMP! proposes that the seduction of making, which also often goes unexamined in the field of art, dangerously reinforces a techno-positivist neoliberal logic of accumulation, which has accelerated the ruinous buildup that is threatening the very possibilities of collective life.

     

    Multispecies Collaboration:
    The ecological crisis facing the planet evokes an apocalypse that can be rationalized and mapped. DUMP! proposes that its key challenge is messy: nature and culture, humans and nonhumans can no longer be taken apart. Plants, fungi, animals, microbes challenge us to reconsider the unruly, rogue, invasive, and unspectacular compilers that hold things together, in effect playing across difference. DUMP! challenges the story of human domestication and mastery with murky, multispecies heaps.

     

     

    Workshop

    Aarhus University Research on the Anthropocene (AURA) and Kunsthal Aarhus host a weekend workshop with creative methods and experimental genres for living in contaminated landscapes, garbage dumps, and compost heaps of the Anthropocene. Led by Niels Bohr Professor Anna Tsing and Professor Nils Bubandt of Aarhus University, Department of Culture & Society, AURA research combines the arts, sciences, and humanities to ask: how might humans and nonhumans continue to inhabit a damaged planet? How might “we” collectively make and unmake livable relations?

    The workshop is organized in conjunction with an exhibition currently on view at Kunsthal Aarhus, curated by Elaine Gan (AURA), Steven Lam (Purchase College, NY), and Sarah Lookofsky (Museum of Modern Art, NY). Over a weekend, the workshop will gather seven different artists-scientists from the exhibition in a series of performances, tastings, presentations, and roundtables. A short story by Ursula K. Le Guin, The Carrier Bag Theory of Fiction provides a rich conceptual framework. (Guests are invited to enjoy reading the short piece in advance.)

     

    elaine_gal (1)

     

    5 September, the workshop opens with a welcome at 10.30am, followed by a curatorial introduction to the exhibition. This will be followed by an AURA presentation on ongoing field research at the brown coal mining beds in Søby Brunkuslejerne. Around noon, Åsa Sonjasdotter (Sweden/Berlin) will lead a potato harvest and share insights on historical trajectories of potato varieties. In the afternoon, Cecilia Vicuña (Chile/NY) will talk about seed collecting and the beings of seeds in Chile and Denmark. This will be followed by Semiya 2015 town hall, an open celebration of seeds and stories. All guests are then invited to take a short break to eat Sonjasdotter’s potatoes harvested in the morning, along with some local beer brews. In late afternoon, Pawel Wojtasik (NY) will do a screening and open discussion on his experimental documentaries and works in progress.

     

    6 September, the workshop reconvenes at 13.00pm, with an open seminar by Etienne Turpin (Jakarta/Berlin) on postnatural histories. This will be followed by a short presentation by Amy Balkin, calling in from San Francisco, CA. At 15.00pm, roundtable discussion among all participants will be held. This roundtable will engage with Le Guin’s short story through three key themes: (a) the work of art and archives as carrier bags in a time of unprecedented environmental crises, (b) problems of scale and narrative, and (c) the representation of species temporalities and differential ontologies through various media (performance, poetry, film, writing). A tasting/cooking event by Spurs collective will be held in the early evening.

     

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    Invitation to become involved

    Collect seeds in late summer
    Examine the particularities and origin of the seeds you find
    Contemplate and love the seeds, share your notes, drawings or photos of them

    Saturday, September 5th at 3 pm at Kunsthal Aarhus, citizens are encouraged to bring their seeds as contributions to a realization of “Semiya”, a 1971 work by the artist Cecilia Vicuña during her visit to Aarhus. Citizens (including scientists and artists) will observe, present and discuss the seeds. Dinner will be served.

    In 1971, Cecilia Vicuña proposed the work “Semiya” to Salvador Allende, the socialist Chilean president who died in the military coup that deposed him two years later. The proposal involved the collection of seeds throughout the country for a gathering and nationwide celebration of seeds. Allende smiled and said the country was not prepared, but perhaps would be by the year 2000. Since the work was never realized at the time, the artist is calling for participation for a realization of the work in 2015 in Denmark in conjunction with the exhibition DUMP! at Kunsthal Aarhus:

    “My idea is very simple: To encourage people to gather seeds as an act of love and contemplation. The collection may be performed during the late summer (August). On the 6th, we will join with and meet others who have been gathering seeds, to engage in a collective conversation. I will contribute with poetry readings and researchers will talk about the current situation of seeds in a global perspective, their loss of habitat and freedom due to the interference of transgenic crops that disturb or contaminate wild and native species. The event will feel like a town hall with people of all ages.

     

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    Online
    Document your collection of seeds on social media (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Flickr, Vine) and use the hashtag #semiya2015. All these seed posts, if they are assigned as public, will automatically gather on the website; https://tagboard.com/semiya2015/231493

     

    At Kunsthal Aarhus
    For the exhibition DUMP! at Kunsthal Aarhus, the artist created the work “Seed Quipu” containing both seeds, recently collected by the artist in Chile, and seeds collected in Aarhus. New seeds will join the installation following the event. Both “Seed Quipu” and the Danish enactment of “Semiya” are created in close collaboration the researchers Meredith Root-Bernstein and Marilena Campos of AURA (Aarhus University Research on The Anthropocene).

     

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    About the artist:
    Cecilia Vicuña is a poet and multidisciplinary artist from Chile. Her work embodies the meeting point between art and poetry, text and textile, the body and the land. Her ritual performances/site specific installations bring together the oral traditions of the Andes, science and linguistics to meet the contemporary realities of ecological disaster. Vicuña’s art has been exhibited in New York at the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Museum of Modern Art, at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Chile, and at the Institute of Contemporary Arts and the Whitechapel Art Gallery in London. Her most recent book is Spit Temple, 2013. Vicuña is a founding member of Artists for Democracy.

    Head to Kunsthalaarhus.dk for information on DUMP! and other exhibitions.

    Thank you to Kunsthal Aarhus for text and photos.

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    Norwegian artist Rina Charlott Lindgren

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 24th July 2015
  • Rina Charlott Lindgren 15

    Norwegian artist Rina Charlott Lindgren first came to our attention as one of the artist in Residency at the Nordic Artists’ Centre Dalsåsen. She was born in Tromsø, Norway but now resides in the culture hub in the centre of Europe, Brussels.    “Alignement IV”, wood and graphite 2015 and “Glacier”, pencil on paper, 2015 […]




    Norwegian artist Rina Charlott Lindgren first came to our attention as one of the artist in Residency at the Nordic Artists’ Centre Dalsåsen.

    She was born in Tromsø, Norway but now resides in the culture hub in the centre of Europe, Brussels.

     

    Rina Charlott Lindgren 3

     Alignement IV”, wood and graphite 2015 and “Glacier”, pencil on paper, 2015

     

    Art historian, art critic and curator Joakim Borda compiled a summary about Rina, talking about her as an artist, her works and style. Describing her interpretations on Norwegian Goth also known as Nordic Gloom, Joakim reflects on this young artist who is increasingly becoming respected within this art genre.

     

    Rina Charlott Lindgren 5

    “Collection”, graphite and pencil on paper, 2015 and “Collection II”, graphite on paper, 2015

     

    Mysteries of Ocean – Reflections on the work of Rina C. Lindgren

    It is twilight in an almost barren Birchwood forest, with ghoulish green reflections tainting the scarce foliage clustering on the top of naked stems. In this sort of dark gloomy forest well known from Scandinavian folklore with its many tales of trolls and sprites, a portal into another dimension opens itself in thin air, white light streaking out it. Like few other artists of her generation, Rina C. Lindgren knows how to create enigmatic images that are as uncanny as technically exquisite.

     

    Rina Charlott Lindgren 6

    Overview

     

    I have had the privilege of working with Lindgren on several curatorial projects since she graduated from Trondheim Art Academy in 2011. In that short time she has become one of the most promising exponents of what has been described as Norwegian Gothic, or Nordic Gloom – a contemporary interpretation of Gothic aesthetics within contemporary art with a particular Scandinavian sensibility. In her book “Heart of Darkness: a Poetics of Darkness”, Anne Williams describes the essence of Gothic conventions as the systematic representation of ‘otherness’. The basic formula of Gothic representation can often be reduced in opposites such as good/evil, nature/culture or male/female. It is in the tension between such opposites that the Gothic appears in fiction and art.

     

    Rina Charlott Lindgren 12

    “Sample”, pencil on paper and collage, 2015

     

    Choosing often to work in pencil on paper, Rina Lindgren deal with a string of themes, which can be divided in motifs that closely connect to the symbolic imagery of Romanticism, such as ruins, caves, dead trees and stormy seascapes, “the dangerous mysteries of ocean” Mary Shelley described in her classic Gothic novel Frankenstein (1818). These works can be seen as commentaries on the Romantic idea of the terrible Sublime, awe-striking and frightening at the same time. In a seminal work entitled What is left Behind III (2011) a buried young man is consumed by the roots of a tree, bringing to mind the corpse brides and vampiric phenomena of Gothic horror.

     

    Rina Charlott Lindgren 13

    “Fall is a feeling”, pencil on paper , 2014

     

    Parallel to this, Lindgren also explores a more intensely psychological landscape rooted in her own personal history. Born above the Polar Circle in the Northern Norwegian city of Tromsø, Lindgren is no stranger to “the land of mist and snow”, as Coleridge describes it in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798). In fact, a recurrent theme in Lindgren’s work revolves around the ancient coastal culture of her home region, and her own family history with a seaman father leave biographical traces in both her drawings and sculptural work. Recurrent motifs connected with the Northern coasts, such as lighthouses, fishing boats and fjords are paired with three-dimensional and collages works that incorporate found objects from an inherited family house in Lofoten, as well as memorabilia of her father’s life at sea. These works resemble reliquaries of private devotion, nostalgic perhaps of a culture nearly extinguished by modernity.

     

    Rina Charlott Lindgren 15

    “Solgløtt III” graphite on paper, 2014

     

    Recent works however, seem to move away from the previous fascination with Romanticism and nostalgia. Although architectural details have always featured prominently in her works as traces of culture, lately Lindgren expresses a particular interest in the formal aspects of architecture. Walls, windows and ceilings organise space, ultimately defining the limits between inside and outside. Again we can trace the basic dichotomy between nature and culture, but now the artist turns a more scrutinising eye towards the latter. Paradoxically a long stay in the remote surroundings of Lofoten seem to have had a restricting effect on the artist’s need for visual representations of northern Norway, replacing them for a more abstract and culturally disassociated imagery, although natural phenomena like the sea, forests and skies still play an important role.

     

    Rina Charlott Lindgren(1)

    “Days are floating through my eyes II”, graphite on paper, 2015

     

    Although a young artist in the early beginning of her trajectory, Rina C. Lindgren’s great promise lies in the consistency of her work, in both it’s trueness to a subject matter that is poetic and uncompromising in its draughtsmanship.

    The next solo show from Rina, titled “Wind blown blue”, will be in Bodø kunstforening with opening 1stAugust.

    Photos credited to Thomas Falstad

    www.rinalindgren.net

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    Danish artist – Claus Thurøe

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 21st July 2015
  • -Night Fly- - 80 x 80 cm

    Danish artist – Claus Thurøe was born and lives in one of Denmark’s culture cities, Copenhagen. Known for its embrace of artists, Claus has nurtured his career here to go on to specialise in Landscapes, which are shown through his solo exhibitions.       We spoke with Claus and asked him to take us through […]




    Danish artist – Claus Thurøe was born and lives in one of Denmark’s culture cities, Copenhagen. Known for its embrace of artists, Claus has nurtured his career here to go on to specialise in Landscapes, which are shown through his solo exhibitions.

     

     

     

    We spoke with Claus and asked him to take us through his history and how his talent has evolved.

     

    I have been creating art since 1983 when I started with collages of paper.
    1986 was the year I started painting. First on plates then on canvas in 1989. I have over the years made paintings inspired from the industrial environments, Japan, the Faroe Islands, natural landscapes cityscapes and people.

    Back 1987 I visited Israel for a month and spent my time sketching and drawing.

    After returning home, I was more focused on my style and used acrylic on masonite. This turned into a series of portraits.
    The following month I started painting with acrylic on canvas and depicted the industrial environment, sports, theater and other subjects under the title Figurative Cubism.

     

    1-timo-moto-on-his-mothers-back-claus-thuroe

     

    In 1991, I was in Japan for 3 months. There I was fascinated by the old Japanese woodcut prints Ukiyo-e. I visited many ukiyo-e exhibitions and decided to work with motifs from a Cubist perspective.

    I have now painted Cubist Ukiyo-e since 1990 and still enjoy it  to this day. I find it inspiring especially because I can see that my style evolves and the paintings change expression.

    In 2008, I was asked to illustrate children’s and workbook “Timo Moto adventure” with my Japanese paintings. This resulted in a series of paintings.

    In that period, I have also visited the Faroes several times and tried to express my experiences in my work. My Faroese paintings, allow me to show the magnificent natural scenery and the interaction between it and the man-made constructions upon it.
    In 2010, I began to combine the Japanese and Faroese landscape in a kind of “Landscape Fantasy”.

    In 2014, I visited New York and this inspired my work with cityscapes.

     

    cityscape-with-tower-claus-thuroe

     

    I then started to paint significantly different from my previous paintings where I previously had a far tightened control of painting. The new design choices challenge me with the many striking colour contrasts and the heavy brushstrokes. During the process, the paintings seem fairly chaotic for me, where I eventually tighten up the result. This appeals to me a lot.

    I try now to combine the old buildings with the modern buildings that are springing up everywhere these days. The urban skyline is changing forever these days.

    I’m very inspired by Copenhagen and other European medieval cities. Their random urban design with nice big beautiful buildings, where the atmosphere is reflected by colours. I portray but also depict the small streets and squares, and quirky spaces. The buildings dark windows capture the imagination and ask the question  “what happens there, what life is lived there”.

    I visited New York in 2014  and tried to capture the city’s historical ambience. The city is almost done on a drawing board, but despite its wide open streets and squares, there is a high degree of proximity. I made my Nordic comment to New York in 12 paintings.

    Early in 2015 I decided to try to illustrate through my paintings, the electronic sense and the electronic human in the digital age. The digital society today is very individual in all directions. This resulted in a series of paintings in which I plan to continue working within this style.

     

    the-village-in-the-west-claus-thuroe

     

    Exhibitions

    Denmark in Museums, exhibition halls, galleries and art fairs.
    Exhibitions in Norway, The Faroe Islands, Japan, USA.

    I have received a Danish scholarship “De Bielkeske Legater”.

    Check out ct-art.dk for more information

     

    Upcoming Exhibitions 

    Solo exhibition at Gentofte Townhall, Copenhagen. August 2015.
    Gentofte.dk

    Exhibition in Gallery Habsø, Midtjyllands Kunst Center. October 2015
    habsoe.dk

    Christmas exhibition at The Peter Faber House, Copenhagen. December 2015

     

    Paintings 

    Gimignano” – 130 x 150 cm
    Inspired by San Gimignano, which is an Italian city located in Tuscany.
    San Gimignano was in 1990 UNESCO World Heritage Site because of it’s well-preserved and unique medieval architecture.

     

    Gimignano - 130 x 150 cm.

     

    View from Brooklyn Bridge” – 80 x 80 cm
    Inspired of New York, when I was walking to Brooklyn on The Bridge.

     

    -View from Brooklyn Bridge- - 80 x 80 cm

     

    Dome” – 60 x 80 cm
    Inspired of The Marble Church in Copenhagen. It was build 1749-1894 and is landmark for a part of Cph. called “Frederiksstaden” (Frederik City).

     

    -Dome- - 60 x 80 cm

     

    Night Fly” – 80 x 80 cm
    The digital human having an evening stroll in cyberspace

     

    -Night Fly- - 80 x 80 cm

     

    E-Links” – 80 x 80 cm
    The digital human creates connections crisscrossing

     

    -E-Links- - 80 x 80 cm

     

    Watch a video about Claus https://vimeo.com/115210998

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    The Scream from Nature

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 15th July 2015
  • The Scream from Nature is an eco-art project which aims to raise consciousness about the relationship between humans and nature. The project is a contemporary interpretation of Munch’s masterpiece the Scream, in which the iconic anxiety-ridden face is recreated in nature with a variety of materials.     Munch wrote several texts about the Scream […]




    The Scream from Nature is an eco-art project which aims to raise consciousness about the relationship between humans and nature. The project is a contemporary interpretation of Munch’s masterpiece the Scream, in which the iconic anxiety-ridden face is recreated in nature with a variety of materials.

     

    IMG_1577

     

    Munch wrote several texts about the Scream motif, the most poignant among these being: “I felt a huge unending scream course through nature”. Now, over 100 years later, we hear another ”scream” from nature: droughts, forest fires, floods, earth slides, extreme weather, melting glaciers and mass extinction of animal and plant species are just some of the challenges the world faces today.

     

    Hove Music Festival

    Initiated by Norwegian artist Lise Wulff, the Scream from Nature is developed in collaboration with the environmental NGO Bellona, Pure CSR and Serbian artist Branislav Nikolic. The project was part of the official celebration of Edvard Munch’s 150th anniversary in 2013, and collaborates with the United Nations Environment Programme.

    Thousands of people from all over the world have made screams to help nature be heard; HRH Crown Prince Haakon of Norway, Nobel Peace Prize winner and head of IPCC at the time Dr. Pachauri, artist Cee Lo Green, the Norwegian Ministers of Environment, of Culture and of Development, the pro teams at La Vuelta a España 2013, UNEP delegates to the Governing Council in Nairobi in 2013, and many more.

     

    Beach clean up Skrik av rakgods i fjæra Bakkamyra skole

     

    About the artist behind the project: 

    Lise Wulff connects the realms of art and culture with those of the environment and nature. Her practice employs a variety of media, ranging from painting, sculpture and land art to large scale projects.

    Wulff seeks to make visible the interconnectedness between humans and nature. Some of her works make explicit the fragility of nature, while others show the force of nature, as her art is left to the dominance of natural processes and the perpetual changes of seasons and time.

    Lise Wulff has exhibited in galleries and museums in Norway and abroad. Recent group exhibitions include Lost Garden at the Henie Onstad Art Centre, Norway; Ahoj at the Museum Kampa, Praha; Elements at ArtEco Gallery, London; and Izložba at Treci Gallery, Belgrade. Her last solo show Benetah and Below (the Outside is Shallow) was at the Bærum Kunstforening, Norway.

     

    Lise_Wulff_Photo Stephanie Drescher Basiliscus production

    Photo Stephanie Drescher Basiliscus production

     

    Make your own Scream from Nature and share it with the world

    Scream grid

    Use your creativity. Choose a material – for example, collect waste, like plastic, metal or electronic waste that later can be recycled. Put it in the shape of the scream. If you need a drawing to look at, here is one

     

     

     

    Take a picture of your scream

     

     

     

    Share it with the world* :

    instagram

    Instagram: Tag your photo with #thescreamfromnature, and location   tag if you want

    facebookFacebook: Share and feel free to add you personal comments and where in the world your scream was done

    If these options do not suit you, you are welcome to send your Scream to scream@thescreamfromnature.com, and we will publish it for you.

     

    London Thames residues

     

    thescreamfromnature.com

     

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    XX Mänttä Art Festival – Finland

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 10th July 2015
  • manatta

    New Present To Open Up The Senses And Provoke Thought Since starting Nordophile we have been overwhelmed by the quality of art exhibitions, festivals and groups of people who are promoting and showcasing not only Nordic artists but the support these Nordic countries gives when welcoming international artists. We have come across XX Mänttä Art Festival – Finland […]




    New Present To Open Up The Senses And Provoke Thought

    Since starting Nordophile we have been overwhelmed by the quality of art exhibitions, festivals and groups of people who are promoting and showcasing not only Nordic artists but the support these Nordic countries gives when welcoming international artists.

    We have come across XX Mänttä Art Festival – Finland and are excited by the 2015 offering. 14th July- 31st August.

     

    manatta

     

    The curators of this summer’s Mänttä Art Festival, Kalle Hamm and Dzamil Kamanger, have invited to the exhibition an impressive sample of international artists working in Finland. At the festival, spatial, audio and video installations, as well as community art projects, take centre stage. The works of 43 artists and artist groups create a phenomenal whole that offers new perspectives on the world today.

    Sight is not the only sense required to enjoy this exhibition. Contemporary art is multisensory, multidisciplinary and thought-provoking. In this exhibition, artists also become commentators via the intervention of the Third Space collective.

     

    curators

     

    Many of the artworks create new spaces, lounges and miniature worlds inside the Pekilo Exhibition Hall. Karolina Kucia lets the exhibition guest take the place of a cockroach, shining a spotlight on the small and ignored. Carolina Sandell’s installation Collage of Time and Space is a glimpse into the life stages of a young person in different cities, apartments and time periods. The guests can immerse themselves in the world of senses, for example in Hilda Kozári’s fragrant room and inside Meri Linna’s installation, where the sense of sight is excluded altogether.

    The Library of Influential Books by Tellervo Kalleinen and Oliver Kochta-Kalleinen is comprised of books that have made an impact in the thinking of the hundred people representing a statistical sample of the entire population of Finland. The installation is based on their project, 101 For All, that will be reported in full next autumn at Kunsthalle Helsinki. Edwina Goldstone has transferred inside the exhibition space an entire barn that bears on its walls human faces and Karelian landscapes from old glass plate negatives.

    Ray Langenbach and David A.R. Ross invite the audience into a combined lounge and study, where they can listen to the amazing life story of Ross unwinding like a veritable thriller. Their work, Habeas Corpus, poses questions: Whose word is taken to be the truth and how is reality being manipulated? At the same time, the installation offers perspectives into the relations between Finland and the US, international crime and child trafficking.

    Politics and scrutiny of the past are also heavily present in the NÆS group’s installation The Trace (Exercise no. 3), examining the emergence of the Finnish welfare state, and in Diego Bruno’s video installation, Galindez, tackling Argentina’s history and different forms of torture.

     

    manatta

     

    The exhibition takes us from the countryside into the city and from the nature and the earth all the way into outer space. The artist group Ore.e Refineries has brought bales of hay indoors and compiled the Trans-Horse Anthology, a critical review of modern Finnish equestrian culture. On June 5th, the group rode their horses from Keuruu to Mänttä, travelling the 50-kilometre journey in 10-plus hours. During the summer, the group will organize events such as carriage rides and assisted riding.

    The focus of Egle Oddo’s installation performance, Word for Freedom, is a towering sculpture of a bud holding seeds of various plants within. During the Mänttä Music Festival, an event combining theatre, performance art and music will take place around the sculpture. Shinji Kanki’s solar-powered sound installation Music for Flowers in a White Round Tea House captures the hearing with white noise, establishing a connection with the universe.

    This summer, Taavetinsaari Island next to the Joenniemi Manor is transformed into Isle of the Dead. The guests can reflect on the cycles of nature and life by the sculptures of William Dennisuk and the wind chimes of Mark Mitchell. Hill of Crosses by Pira Cousin is a memorial grove in the form of an installation. The audience is invited to participate in building and expanding it by making memorial crosses for their loved ones.

     

    mantta3Ahsan Masood: Lori (Lullaby), still from video, 2013

     

    In the Mänttä town centre, various communities are given a voice. During the summer, the Town Hall of Mänttä- Vilppula is taken over by cleaners who, via Martta Tuomaala’s video documentation, speak of the harsh treatment of their profession in Finland. Social Landscapes by Jyri Pitkänen spreads out into the cafés and restaurants of the centre, presenting the values of the surrounding businesses. The Mänttä Library will also present Pitkänen’s video art made together with the Omapolku group. The townscape also includes Kölnsinki by Yvapurü Samaniego, a series of tape art commenting on advertising imagery.

    The artworks of XX Mänttä Art Festival come together to create a network of friendship, where different cultures and eras, seriousness, lightheartedness and outspokenness meet, enter into fluent dialogues and intertwine with each other.

     

    harrieliveart

    2015 Artist Harrie Liveart  harrieliveart.com

    XX Mänttä Art Festival
    14 June – 31 August, 2015
    Open Every Day, including Midsummer, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. www.mantankuvataideviikot.fi

    Further Details:
    Kalle Hamm and Dzamil Kamanger, Curators hamm.kamanger@gmail.com

    Elissa Määttänen, Press and Exhibition Secretary 044 023 4587, kuvataideviikot.tiedottaja@gmail.com

    Tiina Nyrhinen, Executive Director
    044 259 9194, kuvataideviikot@gmail.com

     

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    NuArt festival

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 9th July 2015
  • tilt

    Nordophile was drawn to NuArt by it being such an expressive, improvised, exploration of art by the artists attending this Norwegian art festival collaboration in Stavanger, Norway. NuArt starts with Nuart Plus (Academic and Industry conference) Sept 3-5th. The Exhibition & Festival opening : Sept 5th 7pm And then the Exhibition: Sept 6-Oct 11. Open Wed-Sun […]




    Nordophile was drawn to NuArt by it being such an expressive, improvised, exploration of art by the artists attending this Norwegian art festival collaboration in Stavanger, Norway. NuArt starts with Nuart Plus (Academic and Industry conference) Sept 3-5th.
    The Exhibition & Festival opening : Sept 5th 7pm And then the Exhibition: Sept 6-Oct 11. Open Wed-Sun

    nuart1

    ICY & SOT

    The concept is refreshing to a world which is often limited by other people’s boundaries. NuArt encourages and promotes genuine free expression through art on an open stage to encourage debate and allows the audience to watch the artist’s story unfold in a very natural way.

    A world of no constraints is magnified from different genres of art with no corporate intervention.

    Just imagine the eclectic and raw end results you will see at NuArt! One of the most exciting art exhibitions you will see.

    Nordophile spoke with its Director and founder, Martyn Reed.

     

    tilt

    TILT

    Nuart is an annual independent international contemporary street and urban art festival established in 2001. Since 2005, the festival has focussed exclusively on Street Art making the event one of the oldest there is. The Festival is based in Stavanger on the West Coast of Norway.

    The Nuart Festival follows the ethos behind the Nu teams desire to provide an annual platform for national and international artists who operate outside of traditional systems. Outsiders if you like. The event aims to stimulate debate by challenging entrenched notions of what art is, and more importantly, can be. Nuart aims to provide an internationally relevant, challenging and dynamic environment for artists, students, gallery goers and public alike, an event that aims to reflect the culture as well as participate it helping define it.

    Nuart aims to explore and present new movements and works from within the field loosely termed “Street Art”. Street art has its roots in situationism, graffiti, post-graffiti, muralism, comic culture, stencil art and activism amongst many other things. It is without a doubt the most exciting development in visual art for decades. A “movement” that has caught the imagination of the general public, collectors, auction houses and curators the world over.

     

    martynwhatson

    MARTIN WHATSON

    Nuart consists of a series of citywide exhibitions, events, performances, interventions, debates & workshops surrounding current trends and movements in street art practice by some of the worlds leading practitioners and emerging names.

    Street art as a genre has developed significantly over the past few years, and Nuart is a leading festival on a world basis concerned with the task of identifying, promoting and presenting both pioneers and emerging talents within the scene. The artists who attend the festival are among the most acclaimed and progressive public art practitioners in the world.

    Nuart continues to pioneer a new breed of art exhibition that is neither institutionalised nor commercial, giving the artists free reign to express themselves to the full. Without the usual restraints of curatorial and corporate preferences, the event consistently brings out the best in its invited guests.

    From the first week of September an invited international team of street artists start to leave their mark on the city’s walls, both indoor and out, creating one of Europe’s most dynamic and constantly evolving public art events.

    Nuart is a not for profit event run by a small group of idealistic volunteers, vandals and bored arts professionals.

     

    nuart

    LEVALET

    Join our crew for Nuart 2015!

    We’re looking for enthusiastic people who wish to gain some invaluable experience this fall. The volunteers are an essential part of the festival and contribute in all areas of the production. Help us create one the world’s leading street art festivals, let’s make this years festival the best one yet! Drivers, catering, painters, writers, production crew and artist hosts are all needed. If you have skills you think we may need, just drop us a message.

    Send a quick mail including a little info about yourself to info@nuartfestival.no

    www.nuartfestival.no

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    Søren Solkær – Danish Photographer

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 8th July 2015
  • SørenSolkær_b&w

    Søren Solkær is a Danish photographer, born in 1969. He has been working with a global profile since 1996. Søren is best known for his distinctive portraits of musicians. He is most recognised as the man responsible for various iconic images of Björk, The White Stripes, Franz Ferdinand, David Lynch, The Arctic Monkeys, R.E.M. and […]




    Søren Solkær is a Danish photographer, born in 1969. He has been working with a global profile since 1996.

    Søren is best known for his distinctive portraits of musicians. He is most recognised as the man responsible for various iconic images of Björk, The White Stripes, Franz Ferdinand, David Lynch, The Arctic Monkeys, R.E.M. and U2.

    The photography by Søren is characterised by finding a tension point between intimacy and edginess. His portraits are often regarded as cinematic in tone with a distinctive colour palette. The inspirations for his style as a photographer is ranging from filmmakers David Lynch and Wong Kar-Wai through to the works of photographer Philip-Lorca diCorcia and painter Caspar David Friedrich.

    SørenSolkær_b&w

    He has released three fine art photography books: Beat City (2006), CLOSER (2011), Souls (2011) and SURFACE (2015). They are available in selected exhibitions as well as in stores worldwide.

    Works have been exhibited in New York, Oxford, Copenhagen, Sydney, Melbourne, London, Edinburgh, Los Angeles, Oslo, Chicago, Milano, Napoli, Bratislava, Reykjavik, Cologne and Prague and are featured as part of the permanent collection in The Royal Danish Library and The National Portrait Collection in Frederiksborg Castle, Denmark.

     SørenSolkær_OnStreetShoot

    Søren in his own words.

    I grew up in a small village in the south of Denmark. That was a great place to live until I became a teenager. As Lou Reed put it on Songs for Drella, the album he did for Andy Warhol:

    There is only one good thing about small town

    You know that you want to get out

    I recorded mixtapes of music from German radio stations and listened to Radio Luxembourg from underneath my blankets at night.

     

    The White Stripes - Nashville 2007

     

    When I graduated from high school I urgently wanted to go travelling. I saved up some money working in the local slaughterhouse and jumped on an Aeroflot plane to Bangkok with my best friend. I was supposed to go home after four months in Southeast Asia, but I was very far from done with travelling. I had just spent my last money on my first SLR camera and literally had to survive on bananas and peanuts for a while. I got my brother to wire me some money and used it to get to Australia. I was 20 and ready to meet the world with a camera around my neck.

     

    Inspiration and Style

    My biggest inspiration is cinema and painting. The use of artificial lighting on location creates an atmosphere of hyperrealism. Storytelling is another important aspect in my image making. I like to use locations to create a stage where people can play and express themselves. I like to see my photographs as imaginary film stills. My photographic studies in Prague and my meeting with Czech photography inspired me a great deal. The staged quality and the somewhat somber mood seemed to resonate well with my Scandinavian sensibility.”

     

    Björk - London 2007

     

    Søren’s work is commonly noted for its condensed, inward and emotional feel. His visual universe is often described as melancholic or stylized with a subtle sense of humour.

    Beyond its grandiose, cinematic quality, Søren’s work often reveals inspiration from less-likely sources.

    I am also really inspired by painters and certain elements of their work, such as Francis Bacons’ use of space or the mood conveyed in Edward Hopper’s work ‘Nighthawks’.”

     

    Anton Corbijn & model Helena Christensen - Copenhagen 1999

    Current Exhibitions

    COPENHAGEN @ Øksnehallen
    In collaboration w/ V1 Gallery June 12 – end of July  2015
    Grand opening June 12

    Øksnehallen is one of the largest exhibition venues in the Vesterbro district of Copenhagen.

    OSLO @ Kistefos-Museum
    Rockens Ikoner – w/ Bent Rej May 31 to October 4  2015

    Kistefos-Museum is an industry museum, art gallery and Scandinavia’s largest park of contemporary sculpture.

    Kistefos-Museet

    sorensolkaer.com

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    MOMENTUM – TUNNEL VISION

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 29th June 2015
  • momentum

    Nordophile is happy to showcase the Momentum 8th Nordic Biennial of Contemporary Art, Tunnel Vision.     Showing now, just outside of Oslo until the 27th September, Tunnel Vision is an exploration that will encapture and intrigue even the vaguest of art lovers. The concept and story surrounding this will convert many Nordophiles exploring Nordic […]




    Nordophile is happy to showcase the Momentum 8th Nordic Biennial of Contemporary Art, Tunnel Vision.

     

    momentum

     

    Showing now, just outside of Oslo until the 27th September, Tunnel Vision is an exploration that will encapture and intrigue even the vaguest of art lovers. The concept and story surrounding this will convert many Nordophiles exploring Nordic art.

     

     

    momentum

    FERDINAND AHMKRAG Heliotropic drift 2015
    Video. Loop Courtesy of the artist
    Photo: Vegard Kleven © Punkt Ø/ Momentum

     

    Since its inception in 1998, MOMENTUM has strived to present compelling works of art and outstanding artistic ventures in Norway and the Nordic region.
    The biennial has since become established as one of the most exciting platforms for contemporary art in the Nordic region.

    The 8th Momentum Nordic Biennial of Contemporary Art explores tunnel vision as a cultural and artistic condition. Today’s networked culture not only generates hyper-connectivity, but also various disconnects. People and communities can thrive in bubbles of their own. Momentum 8 focuses on artists and cultural producers who inhabit worlds of their own logic and follow their thoughts all the way through.

     

    momentum

    CHRISTINE ÖDLUND Colored light in far red eyes, 2015
    Stained glass window Courtesy of the artist
    Photo: Vegard Kleven © Punkt Ø/ Momentum

     

    Although the biennial is international in scope, Momentum 8 also digs into a Nordic sentiment of geographic and cultural seclusion. The biennial takes place in Moss, a small city just outside of Oslo where Edvard Munch withdrew for four years. The relative solitude that he enjoyed there, and which helped to cultivate his eclectic and highly personal practice, is not exceptional. Rather, it is exemplary. Tunnel vision might be prone to cultural condemnation as alarmingly asocial, but it has for a long time also lent itself to artistic celebration as disarmingly eccentric. While Momentum 8 addresses phenomena symptomatic of contemporary society and culture, it also deals with the persistent idea of ‘a room of one’s own’ as a premise for artistic practice.

     

    momentum

    STEINGRIMUR EYFJÖRD The Yellow Earring 2015
    Drawings on paper & aluminium, wood, found objects
    Courtesy of the artist Photo: Vegard Kleven © Punkt Ø/ Momentum

     

    Current technoscientific developments encourage individualism at the same time as they foster segregated communities into which one can delve and disappear. The personalization of the Internet through the abundant use of cookies and matching metadata algorithms sparks so-called filter bubbles and you-loops: User data is collected and deployed in a manner that determines what we find and subsequently also what we seek. Our web search queries thus confirm the existing world-view of each and every one of us. If the Internet has been a window to the world, it is now also our own mirror image on the screen.

    Immersion in self-referential loops is echoed in a renewed interest in psychotropic substances in society at large. Whereas the psychedelic movement of the 1960s was concerned with mind expansion, what interests us here are experiences of a narrowing-down of the mind – a state similar to that which one might achieve through trance or meditation. Such a centering might for instance, take the form of obsessive claustrophobia, where insights seem lucid simply because everything else is blanked out. Submerged in a constant flow of information, we find that multitasking and directed concentration are in demand simultaneously. At present, new chemicals, drugs and technologies are used in order to create a tunnel vision that narrows down this spectrum of information and our access to it.

     

    momentum

    Photo credit; Fujiko Nakaya, Fog Garden Murasaki, 2010. Japan Industry Pavilion, Shanghai Expo, China. Copyright: Processart Inc.

     

    Addressing conspiracy theories, paranoia and altered states of mind, the exhibition explores what might be called compressed consciousness, that may appear incestuous, navel-gazing or idiosyncratic.

    At Momentum 8, the theme of tunnel vision will unfold as a multisensory experience triggering altered states of mind and physical awareness. The exhibition aims at creating an atmosphere that appeals to all six senses, and which ties the various venues and events together across time and space.

     

    Curators

    Jonatan Habib Engqvist, Birta Gudjonsdottir, Stefanie Hessler, Toke Lykkeberg.

     

     

    momentum

    SOFIA HULTÉN Indecisive Angles (IV) 2015 Modified steel trolley, paint.
    Courtesy of Daniel Marzona Photo: Vegard Kleven © Punkt Ø/ Momentum

     

    Venues

    Momentum Kunsthall; Moss city centre.

    Galleri F 15; Alby Mansion on the island Jeløy in the Oslo fjord.

     

    www.momentum.no

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    Prize Prints; The Queen Sonja Print Award.

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 9th June 2015
  • prize-prints-awards

    THE AMERICAN-SCANDINAVIAN FOUNDATION (ASF) & SCANDINAVIA HOUSE: THE NORDIC CENTER IN AMERICA Incorporated in New York State in 1911, The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF) is the leading cultural and educational link between the United States and Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. It is a publicly-supported, non-profit 501 (c) (3) organization that provides a forum for […]




    THE AMERICAN-SCANDINAVIAN FOUNDATION (ASF) & SCANDINAVIA HOUSE: THE NORDIC CENTER IN AMERICA

    Incorporated in New York State in 1911, The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF) is the leading cultural and educational link between the United States and Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. It is a publicly-supported, non-profit 501 (c) (3) organization that provides a forum for the exchange of ideas and cultural understanding and has an extensive program of fellowships, grants, internships, training, publishing, membership offerings, and cultural activities. Scandinavia House – home of the ASF– offers a wide range of programs presenting contemporary Nordic culture that encompass the visual arts, music, and literature along with public policy, business, finance, and technology. These programs include art, design, and historical exhibitions as well as films, concerts, readings, lectures, symposia, language courses, and kids and family programs that illustrate and illuminate the modern-day vitality of the Nordic countries.  An American nonprofit organization, the ASF works to build international understanding through an extensive program of fellowships, grants, intern/trainee sponsorship, publishing, and membership offerings. Headquartered at Scandinavia House: The Nordic Center in America, in New York City, the ASF celebrated its centennial in 2011.

    scandinavia-house

    Photo “Courtesy of Scandinavia House/The American-Scandinavian Foundation.”

     

    Exhibition at Scandinavia House: The Nordic Center in America offers an intimate view into contemporary Nordic Printmaking.

    It Features recent work by printmakers Tiina Kivinen, Svend-Allan Sørensen, Kjell Nupen, Ørnulf Opdahl. Her Majesty Queen Sonja of Norway opened it at a reception of the exhibition of contemporary Nordic prints from the recipients and founders of The Queen Sonja Print Award—an international prize established to encourage artists working in the graphic arts.

    Featuring recent work by the 2012 and 2014 award winners, Tiina Kivinen (Finland) and Svend-Allan Sørensen (Denmark), as well as a selection of works by the award’s founders, printmakers Her Majesty Queen Sonja of Norway, Kjell Nupen, and Ørnulf Opdahl, the exhibition offers an intimate view into contemporary printmaking in the Nordic countries. Edward P. Gallagher, President of The AmericanScandinavian Foundation, states: “We are delighted to present this exhibition at Scandinavia House, introducing New York to the work of two exciting artists and celebrating the launch of The Queen Sonja Print Award as an international prize, perhaps the largest ever to be awarded to printmakers.” Overview Prize Prints features a diverse selection of artworks from five Nordic artists.

     

    038

     

    Photo; Eileen Travell, Scandinavia House/The American-Scandinavian Foundation, 2015

     

    Prize Prints; The Queen Sonja Print Award. Established in 2011 to encourage young artists working in the graphic arts, Prize Prints; The Queen Sonja Print Award is presented every other year.

    This show is on through August 1, 2015 Prize Prints celebrates The Queen Sonja Print Award, a biennial prize established to encourage young artists working in the graphic arts. The exhibition features recent work by the 2012 and 2014 prize winners, Tiina Kivinen (Finland) and Svend-Allan Sørensen (Denmark), as well as a selection of works by the prize’s founders, printmakers H.M. Queen Sonja of Norway, Kjell Nupen, and Ørnulf Opdahl. The exhibition also recognizes the exciting international collaboration between the print shops Ateljé Larsen (Helsingborg, Sweden) and Universal Limited Art Editions (Long Island, NY).

    scandinavia house

    Photo; Eileen Travell, Scandinavia House/The American-Scandinavian Foundation, 2015

    While the award has been restricted to Nordic artists— nominated by the Nordic national art museums, Nordic printmakers’ associations, and board of Prize prints; The Queen Sonja Print Award—it will open to international candidates in 2016 with an expanded circle of professional nominators from around the world. Publication Prize Prints is accompanied by a 176-page catalogue entitled Prize Prints; The Queen Sonja Print Award. Published by Arvenius + Orfeus Publishing and edited by art historian Karin Hellandsjø, the catalogue contains interviews with Kjell Nupen, Ørnulf Opdahl, and H.M. Queen Sonja; short texts on the prize winners Tiina Kivinen and Svend-Allan Sørensen; and reproductions of a number of the artworks on view in the exhibition. Exhibition-related Programs Prize Prints will be accompanied by a free mobile-audio guide of exhibition highlights; a symposium with artists, printmakers, and curators in conversation; and kid-friendly workshops led by art educators. A comprehensive exhibition-related programs release with additional information and background will be available shortly.

     

    The 2014 prize winner, Svend-Allan Sørensen, works with a variety of printmaking techniques, including lithography, linocut, and woodcut. His graphic works, often imbued with a certain whimsy or playfulness, operate at the intersection of text and image, where meaning is doubled, expanded, and complicated. In the series Animal Soup of Time, Sørensen interweaves text-based linocuts of literary snippets from Henry David Thoreau, William S. Burroughs, and Allen Ginsberg (the series’s title is taken from Ginsberg’s Howl)—all of which take up the subject of nature and hunting— with abstract renderings resembling arrowheads or seals.

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    Photo; Eileen Travell, Scandinavia House/The American-Scandinavian Foundation, 2015  Svend-Allan Sørensen

    In contrast to Sørensen’s stark, graphic works, the 2012 prize winner Tiina Kivinen’s prints are crafted with delicate nuances of gray and black tones. Working primarily with drypoint, monotype, and mezzotint techniques, Kivinen creates lyrical, semi-abstract renderings of landscapes and figures that offer viewers brief moments of recognition in her ethereal compositions. In addition to works by Sørensen and Kivinen, the exhibition features a selection of works from the three celebrated Norwegian artists who founded The Queen Sonja Print Award—Kjell Nupen, Ørnulf Opdahl, and H.M. Queen Sonja—including the collaborative 24-work portfolio Three Journeys, Three Landscapes that launched the prize. Comprising eight graphic works by each artist, the portfolio takes the Nordic landscape as inspiration and illustrates the unique technical and thematic explorations the artists undertook throughout its creation. Nupen is represented by a diverse selection of collages, aquatints, and etchings that reflect his characteristic use of expressive color and tone; Opdahl by a number of intimately scaled aquatints and etchings contemplating the varied expressions of the Nordic winter landscape; and H.M. Queen Sonja by a series of otherworldly aquatints originating from photographs taken on a 2006 trip to an ice cave on Svalbard. A selection of more recent works by these artists will also be on view.

     

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    Tiina Kivinen, The Earth under My Feet, 2014. Mezzotint, drypoint, 35 2/5 x 49 1/5 in. (90 x 125 cm), courtesy of the artist.

     

     

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    Kjell Nupen, Untitled, 2011. From the series Three Journeys, Three Landscapes. Collage, aquatint and polymer plate, 17 x 22 4/5 in. (43 x 58 cm), courtesy of the artist.

     

    Curatorial Credit Sune Nordgren is trained as a printmaker and graphic designer. He currently holds the position of project leader for The Queen Sonja Print Award. Nordgren has previously served as Director of Malmö Konsthall in Malmö, Sweden, and as the Founding Director of the National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design in Oslo, Norway and the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art in Gateshead, England. Support The exhibition is organized by Sune Nordgren, Project Leader for The Queen Sonja Print Award, and The American-Scandinavian Foundation. The exhibition is made possible by grants from The Bergesen Foundation, DNB Bank ASA, Trond S. Jensen, and Bård and Barbara

    The exhibition is made possible by grants from The Bergesen Foundation, DNB Bank ASA, Trond S. Jensen, and Bård and Barbara Bunaes. Additional support has been received from The Bonnier Family Fund for Contemporary Art, The F. Donald Kenney Fund for the Visual Arts, and The Asbjørn Lunde Fund in Memory of Karl and Elisa Lunde. Funding for travel by Tiina Kivinen has been provided by Arts Promotion Centre Finland. Transportation support has been provided by SAS Scandinavian Airlines. Public programming has been supported in part by a grant from the Royal Norwegian Consulate General in New York.

     

    For more information: scandinaviahouse.org | Facebook | Twitter @ScanHouse | #PrizePrints Hours and Admission

    The Scandinavia House 3rd Floor Gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from 12–6 pm (Wednesday until 7 pm) and exhibition admission is free.

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