Nordic Film Days Lübeck

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 15th September 2015
  • Nordic Film Days Lübeck, first presented by the Lübeck Film Club in 1956 and taken over by the Hanseatic City of Lübeck in 1971, has one of the longest traditions of any film festival worldwide. It is the only festival in Germany, and the only one in Europe, which is entirely devoted to the presentation […]




    Nordic Film Days Lübeck, first presented by the Lübeck Film Club in 1956 and taken over by the Hanseatic City of Lübeck in 1971, has one of the longest traditions of any film festival worldwide. It is the only festival in Germany, and the only one in Europe, which is entirely devoted to the presentation of films from the North and Northeast of Europe.

    Feature films, documentaries and short films from Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Iceland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway and Sweden are presented at this five-day event every year at the beginning of November. In addition, there is an extensive children’s and youth film programme and a retrospective devoted to important eras, specific genres or famous persons of film history. The section Filmforum presents films from North Germany. Accompanying the film programme are seminars, discussions, roundtable talks, concerts and readings.

     

     

    The Nordic Film Days Lübeck is both an audience festival and an important meeting place for the film industry in Germany and northern Europe. Many directors whose debut works were presented in Lübeck have gone on to earn fame around the world – such as Bille August, Lasse Hallström, Aki Kaurismäki or Fridrik Thór Fridriksson.

    The film festival is put on by the Hanseatic City of Lübeck in cooperation with the Scandinavian film institutes and foundations as well as the corresponding film institutions in the Baltic countries. Patrons of the festival are the ambassadors of the Nordic countries in Germany. Honorary President is the Norwegian actress and film director Liv Ullmann. Media partners are the television and radio broadcaster Norddeutscher Rundfunk (NDR) and daily newspaper Lübecker Nachrichten.

    The 2015 official programme will be released early October, but here are some of the previous years winners for you to find some Nordic Films to keep you going until then!

     

    Previous Winners

    The NDR Film Prize for Best Feature Film.

    Endowed with 12,500 euros this prize has been awarded annually since 1990 for a “feature film of special artistic quality.” The film should “reflect society in an independent creative language and open up new perspectives in terms of content and aesthetics.”

    Straße der Hoffnung / Vonarstræti / Life in A Fishbowl
    Baldvin Z (Zophoníasson), Iceland 2014

     

     

     

    Lübecker Nachrichten.

    The oldest festival prize, was founded in 1979 by the newspaper Lübecker Nachrichten. Since 1993, it includes prize money amounting to the current value of 5,000 euros. The prize is awarded to the winning feature film in competition on the basis of an audience ballot.

    2014
    HalloHallo / HallåHallå / HelloHello
    Maria Blom, Sweden 2013

     

     

     

    Baltic Film Prize for a Nordic Feature Film.

    In 1991, filmmakers from the Baltic States created a film prize for an outstanding feature film from the Nordic countries.

    2014
    Schwedenbastard / Svenskjævel / Underdog
    Ronnie Sandahl, Sweden 2014

     

    Photo: © Ita ZbroneicZajt

     

    Documentary Film Prize.

    The Confederation of German Trade Unions (Deutscher Gewerkschaftsbund) awards a film prize for a “socially and politically committed film” from the festival’s documentary film programme. The award carries a cash prize of 2,500 euros. In previous years, the prize was awarded by the Lübeck Trade unions.

    2014
    Früher träumte ich vom Leben / Näin Unta Elämästä / Once I dreamed of Life
    Jukka Kärkkäinen and Sini Liimatainen, Finland 2014

     

     

    Children’s & Youth Film Prize.

    This prize, created in 1983 by the Nordic Film Institutes, has been awarded to the best Scandinavian children’s or youth film since 1993. A genre which has been an important component of the Nordic Film Days since 1979. From 2008 on this prize is endowed with 5,000 euros, donated by the charitable foundation Gemeinnützige Sparkassenstiftung zu Lübeck.

    2014
    Der Lehrjunge / Oppipoika / The Disciple
    Ulrika Bengts, Finland 2013

     


    57. NORDIC FILM DAYS LÜBECK – Festival opens with “Rams” – Retrospective goes on northerly journeys – INTERFILM honourable membership for Linde Fröhlich.

     

     

    Linde Fröhlich announced the first high point of this year’s festival with the opening night film, “Rams” (Hrútar) by director Grímur Hákonarson, an Icelandic-Danish production that won the Un Certain Regard Prize at this year’s Cannes film festival. The NFL is pleased to welcome the Icelandic director and his two leads, Sigurður Sigurjónsson and Theodór Júlíusson as guests at the NFL opening night celebration on November 4, 2015 in Lübeck (the film will be released in Germany in autumn 2015 by Arsenal Filmverleih).

    “The Icelanders are powerful storytellers and Grímur Hákonarson’s “Rams” is the best example of this.  The film is a human drama, filled with empathy for the protagonists, as well as odd situations and comic moments, all set in a spectacular landscape,” said Linde Fröhlich.

    Curator and director of the Retrospective, Jörg Schöning, presented this year’s look back, dedicated to “Northern journeys. Travelogues & Road Movies”. Audiences will be “transported” back in time with a screening of the silent Swedish outdoor drama “The Strongest” (1929), shown with musical accompaniment in cooperation with the Lübeck Academy of Music under the direction of professor Franz Danksagmüller, as well as by maritime documentation by shipboard photographer Richard Fleischhut (1881 – 1951) and film treasures from the National Library of Norway. On top of that, selected road movies will take audiences on sometimes comic, sometimes melancholy, but always adventurous paths to far-flung locales in the Scandinavian film landscape. The series will include films by Ingmar Bergman, Friðrik Þór Friðriksson, Mika and Aki Kaurismäki, as well as directors Karin Ottarssdóttir and Auli Mantila. The Retrospective will open with the world premiere of “Hit the Road Gunnar” by young director Nicolas Ehret.

    For more information about this years event and other features head over to www.luebeck.de

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    The Nordic Council Film Prize 2015

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 31st August 2015
  • The Nordic Council Film Prize nominations for 2015 are out. The purpose of The Nordic Council Film Prize is to support the production of Nordic films in order to strengthen the Nordic film industry, thereby in the long term contributing to the strengthening of Nordic films internationally.     The winner will be a feature […]




    The Nordic Council Film Prize nominations for 2015 are out.

    The purpose of The Nordic Council Film Prize is to support the production of Nordic films in order to strengthen the Nordic film industry, thereby in the long term contributing to the strengthening of Nordic films internationally.

     

     

    The winner will be a feature film that is rooted in Nordic culture, is of high artistic quality and stands out through its artistic originality to form a harmonious work. Innovation within the film genre will also be given positive consideration when comparing the nominated films. The films nominated must primarily be recorded in a Nordic language to be considered for the Film Prize.

    The prize was awarded for the first time on a trial basis in 2002 in connection with the Nordic Council’s 50th anniversary. It became permanent in 2005 and has since been awarded along with the Nordic Council’s other prizes for music, literature, and nature and the environment.

     

    image_16_9_bigger (12)

    The Nordic Council Film Prize 2009 was awarded to the Danish film director and scriptwriter Lars von Trier and producer Meta Louise Foldager for the film ANTICHRIST.

     

    A member of the jury from every Nordic country

    Each Nordic country appoints one jury member and a substitute. These people are film connoisseurs but must be independent of the film industry in their home country and have no personal financial interest in the nominated films.

     

    Nordic Jury appoints the prize winner

    The national jury members form a Nordic Adjudication Committee. The national jury member proposes the nominations from his/her own country. The film nominations are made public at the beginning of September. After that it is the combined Nordic adjudication committee which decides which of the nominated films – one from each Nordic country – will win the prize.

    Films from the Faroe Islands, Greenland and Åland are outside the countries quota of one film each. Nominated films from these countries must be submitted to the Nordic Adjudication Committee. When a Faroese, Greenlandic or Ålandic film has to be judged a jury member from that country is co-opted onto the committee.

     

     

    Film prize divided between three main functions

    The Nordic Council Film Prize is administered by the Nordic Film and TV Fund and is worth DKK 350,000 (approx. €47,000), and thus has the same value as the literature, nature and the environment, and music prizes. The prize money is to be shared between the scriptwriter, the director and the producer, which underlines that film as an art form is the result of close co-operation between these three main functions.

    The Film Prize is usually awarded with the other Nordic prizes for literature, music and nature and the environment during the Nordic Council’s Ordinary Session in the autumn at a special ceremony.

    Previous winners of the Film Prize include Danish Per Fly’s film ‘Drabet’ (‘Manslaughter’) and the film ‘Zozo’ by Josef Fares from Sweden.

     

    The Nordic Council Film Prize Nominations 2015

     

    film-331553_640

     

    Stille hjerte (Silent Heart) – Denmark

     

    Masterfully crafted and played to perfection, director Bille August and screenwriter Christian Torpe tell a warm-hearted story about an unforgettable weekend where a family has to deal with a mother’s wish to die. In the typically Nordic tradition of exorcising all skeletons from the closet, the film dissects one of the most difficult challenges a family can face – saying goodbye to a loved one.

     

    He ovat paenneet (They Have Escaped) – Finland

     

    A gripping coming-of-age drama, a thrilling road movie, a drug-induced fantasy and then some! Jukka-Pekka Valkeapää’s They Have Escaped flirts with genre characteristics only to rise above their respective dynamics and to metamorphose into an expressionistic, no holds barred adult fairytale. The exquisite cinematography combined with a thoughtful, multifaceted soundtrack adds to film’s strong, dreamlike ambiance.

     

    Fúsi (Virgin Mountain) – Iceland

     

    With a delicate touch, director Dagur Kári´s Virgin Mountain is a moving coming-of-age portrait of a gentle giant. In a skilfully nuanced way this humanistic film conveys both inner torment and offbeat charm, while its symbolic interaction of items big and small conveys such universal themes as goodness, giving and grace.

     

    Mot naturen (Out of Nature) – Norway

     

    In Out of Nature, Ole Giæver portrays a self-reflection of our modern lives and today’s Nordic man. A personal yet forthright narrative conveys a collage of mental imagery to express memories, hopes, dreams, and emotive atmospheres, yet all in a good humour that addresses embarrassment, shame and pain.

     

    Gentlemen- Sweden

     

    Gentlemen takes us on a winding journey of a story in which time perspectives and identities are as fluid as the boundary between dreams and fantasy. The attention to detail in the film’s various expressions culminates in a uniquely personal, playful and self-reflective work.

    Photos & text credited to Norden.org

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    Sarah Ward – Author

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 29th July 2015
  • Iceland1

    We’ve been speaking with fellow Nordophile Sarah Ward – author, Scandinavian crime literature judge and crime fiction blogger. Sarah Ward is very much at the heart of Nordic Noir in the UK through her blog, which has reviewed some of the most well-known and successful Nordic Noir literary offerings, as one of the judges alongside […]




    We’ve been speaking with fellow Nordophile Sarah Ward – author, Scandinavian crime literature judge and crime fiction blogger.

    Sarah Ward is very much at the heart of Nordic Noir in the UK through her blog, which has reviewed some of the most well-known and successful Nordic Noir literary offerings, as one of the judges alongside Barry Forshaw and Kat Hall for The Petrona Award for ‘Best Scandinavian Crime Novel‘ and she has recently found the time to sit down and pen her own novel, which although set in the UK most certainly has a noir aspect to it.

     

    Iceland1

     

    Do you consider yourself a Nordophile and completely embrace the whole culture or are you more specific to Nordic literature? 

    I’ve visited all the Nordic countries with the exception of Norway so I do consider myself a Nordophile. I’ve been to Iceland twice and am going later this year and again in 2016 so that’s the country I know the best. However, my main interest is reading in general and crime and thrillers, in particular, Therefore I’m particularly fascinated by the crime fiction that these countries produce.

     

    Out of all the Nordic countries where do you prefer to visit and learn about?

    The first country that I visited was Sweden, then Denmark and Finland and most recently Iceland. I’m always fascinated by the unknown and therefore I’d say that I want to go to Norway the most at the moment. In particular I’d like to visit the arctic circle. There’s something fascinating about the frozen landscape. I’d also like to visit the Sami region of Scandinavia.

     

    How did you first become interested in Scandinavian crime fiction?

    Henning Mankell was the first Scandinavian writer that I read and loved. It was in the late nineties and I devoured all his books. After that, I tried to find as many Scandinavian crime novels as I could. Early favourites were Arnaldur Indridason and Hakan Nesser.

     

    Your successful blog crimepieces.com reviews crime fiction books, particularly Scandinavian crime, how have you seen this genre grow over the last few years?

    In the 2000s, the genre exploded in the UK. I’ve never paid that much attention to the ‘hype’ in Scandinavian crime fiction. I enjoyed the Steig Larsson trilogy but I that think there are better books out there too. Reading for me, first and foremost, is a pleasurable activity. If a book grips me and I can’t put it down, I can forgive the writer most things. I read for entertainment, pleasure and for escapism. Of course, I also read with a critical eye. But I am first and foremost a reader not a critic. 

     

    TeamP

     

    Another role which you have taken on is as one of the judges at the ‘The Petrona Award for Best Scandinavian Crime Novel’. How did Petrona come about and what part do you think the award plays within the Nordic Noir genre?

    The Petrona Award was set up in memory of one of the early bloggers, Maxine Clarke. She was a great reader of Scandinavian crime fiction and supported many of us bloggers when we first started. The award was the brainchild of Karen Meek from Eurocrime and she approached me along with Barry Forshaw and Kat Hall to judge the award. in the three years that it’s been running, we’ve seen the award go from strength to strength and it’s mentioned on the covers of a lot of the shortlisted books. We hope it celebrates the excellence of Scandinavian crime fiction, I think last year there were over forty eligible books. The shortlist was particularly strong and any of those novels could have won.

     

    This has been an extremely busy time for you this past month as you have just published your first crime novel ‘In Bitter Chill’ although it is not set in the Nordics, the ambiance seems to be quite Nordic, was this your intention?

    It wasn’t particularly my intention although the cold landscape has a strong role in my book. I certainly didn’t set out to copy Scandinavian crime fiction. But I think I’m influenced by everything I’ve ever read from Agatha Christie to Jo Nesbo.

     

    In Bitter Chill Royal HB 2Ec 2 small copy

     

    ‘In Bitter Chill’ has been well received, does this mean you have a second novel coming?

    I’ve just finished my second book which is also set in the Derbyshire landscape but this time in spring. It has the same police characters but a new central protagonist. I’m hoping to write a quartet set in the region. So, fingers crossed!

    www.petronaaward.co.uk

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    NORLA, Norwegian Literature Abroad

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 25th June 2015
  • translated-days

    Nordophile wanted to look closer at how Nordic literature is translated. We came across NORLA, a Norwegian institute, who do just that. With demand for Nordic books – as the Nordic Noir and diverse genre Nordic literary obsession sweeps around the world – it is up to a few very helpful people to make this possible for countries […]




    Nordophile wanted to look closer at how Nordic literature is translated. We came across NORLA, a Norwegian institute, who do just that.

    With demand for Nordic books – as the Nordic Noir and diverse genre Nordic literary obsession sweeps around the world – it is up to a few very helpful people to make this possible for countries whose first language isn’t one of the Scandinavians, but still would like to immerse themselves in Nordic literature.

    Norway is very proactive when it comes to translating and promoting its authors and their works around the world.

     

    NORLA

     

    NORLA, the Centre for Norwegian literature abroad, promotes Norwegian literature export through active promotion of work and support for translation. The organization spreads knowledge of Norwegian books and authors abroad, and operation is funded by the Ministry of Culture. NORLAwas created in 1978 and has so far supported translations of Norwegian books to 63 languages. NORLA offers a variety of support schemes all aim to promote translations Norwegian books.

     

    norla

     

    Norwegian books in translation published so far this year

    As of 15 June 2015, NORLA has received 204 Norwegian books that have been published in a total of 41 languages through NORLA’s
    (and in the Nordic region: The Nordic Council of Ministers’) translation subsidies.
    There are 165 fiction publications and 39 non-fiction publications. And of these a total of 41 are titles for children and young people.

    Translator of the month

    Our new series of translator interviews (in Norwegian) has been well received. We are now happy to introduce the translator for June:
    Gabriele Haefs from Germany. She has translated an impressive number of Norwegian authors and in 2011 received the Royal Norwegian Order of Merit for her oeuvre.

     

    translated-days

     

    Causerie competition for translators of Norwegian literature

    NORLA is repeating the success from the translation festival (Oversatte Dager) of 2013 and once again invites
    translators of Norwegian literature to take part in our causerie competition.
    Please note that the competition is open only for those who translate directly from Norwegian.

    Photo from Norla.no

    Oversattedager.no

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