Finnish artist & photographer – Milla Koivisto

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 5th February 2016
  • Kaikubanner

    Nordophile was very excited to come across Finnish artist & photographer, Milla Koivisto. Not purely just because of her breath-taking artistic view of the Nordic landscape but also because of her natural intensity when relating back to her audience her vision. Milla Koivisto is an artist, photographer and author from Finland. Her focus is on the […]




    Nordophile was very excited to come across Finnish artist & photographer, Milla Koivisto. Not purely just because of her breath-taking artistic view of the Nordic landscape but also because of her natural intensity when relating back to her audience her vision.

    Milla Koivisto is an artist, photographer and author from Finland. Her focus is on the natural world and our connections and relationship with it. Milla studied both illustration and visual communication at the Arts University of Bournemouth. She also studied classical flute and music theatre in Finland. She works with several artistic disciplines and her interest lies in narrative structures and storytelling. She currently divides her time between Finland and the UK.

     

    Kaiku

    We were keen to understand more about the Kaiku project from this Finnish artist and find out how this would translate to peak the interest of Nordophiles, with a certain attraction to the Nordic arts, in all genres.

    Kaiku is an audio-visual project, structured around a core narrative. Set in and inspired by the Nordic landscape of the Finnish archipelago, Kaiku tells the story of a reclusive Shaman, a flute playing girl called Aino and her echo Kaiku. The protagonists of the story face the harshness and the isolation brought by the landscape and each of their lives is a manifestation of learning and surviving by the stipulations of nature. Music and sound in the natural world become ways of connecting, coping and conveying feelings in the dialogue-less story of Kaiku.

    In the Kaiku project traditional storytelling is combined with modern narrative technique. The project combines words, images, recorded sound, compositions and video. The Kaiku project will be released in a series of exhibitions, events and talks during 2015-2017.

     

    The Kaiku Series

    The first short film in the Kaiku series, ‘The Old Woman’ is an exploration of solitude through sound and image and portrays the landscape of an old woman called Aino’s soul. The film was shot during a three month stay on a treeless lighthouse island of Bengtskär in the Baltic Sea in Finland.

     

     

    The Kaiku book

    The first part of the Kaiku project is an illustrated, fictional book. Set on a small island where the winter days are short and the summer sun never sets and life must adapt to the changing seasons. A vision of two women with the same face sets a reclusive shaman on a journey from his dark forest cabin to the barren, windswept shores of a lighthouse.

    In Kaiku our relationship with nature is explored through sounds and seasons. Set over the course of a year in the isolation of a small island Kaiku  is the result of a long-running fascination with traditional narrative, folklore and the natural environment.

     

    To order the book and find out more about Milla Koivisto head over to Millakoivisto.com

    Milla talks about the origins of the Kaiku project on her site which gives us an insight into her thought process and how the idea was born.

    “A story had been brewing in my mind for some time, not leaving me alone. On the last day of December 2012 I sat down at my desk in my apartment in Brighton and started to write. I have always been writing stories, but never been mature enough to sit still long enough to finish a longer piece. Writing a book is of course more then just an endurance sport -it is about finding a story you believe in, are passionate about and know is true. For me there was only one thing I could write about. I had to write about the sea and the island I grew up on. The project became a love letter to the landscape I knew. I was brought up on a small island called Kemiönsaari in the south coast of Finland, in the Baltic Sea. At the time I started writing Kaiku I had been living in the UK for seven years. I realised how little was written or known about the Finnish culture outside Finland. It became clear to me that the story needed to be written in English, so I added this on to my challenge and started writing in my third language.

    I started to write about an island, about a Shaman, a girl called Aino and her echo Kaiku. Kaiku in Finnish is both a name and the event of a sound caused by the reflection of sound waves from a surface back to the listener – an echo. What I wanted to portray in the story was the interconnection with the natural world and the people. It was important for me to show the integral connection between the people and their land. It also became a story about solitude, isolation and loneliness, themes I feel are close to the Finnish people through our characteristics, the geographical location of the country and perhaps even through the dissimilarity of our language compared to most other European languages.

     

     

    From the very beginning I wanted to create a whole world around the story of Kaiku. I wanted to not only to tell a story with words but also to make it come alive with sound and images. Kaiku became a multidisciplinary project structured around a core narrative. It is a project combining words, image, sound and music and video. So far the project has taken me to three small islands in Finland. In Summer 2014 I spent a month on the island of Kökar, in the Baltic Sea in Finland, living in the old post office that was converted in to an artist residence. My purpose was to compose and collect natural sounds for the project. I returned to the island in January 2015 to further compose and collect, this time the sound world of the Nordic winter. In summer of 2015 I divided my time living in Kemiönsaari and the small lighthouse island of Bengtskär at the Baltic Sea where I filmed and recorded natural sounds.

    Kaiku is an ongoing project which will be completed in 2017. The first part of the project, is a book titled Kaiku.”

    Contact Milla here

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    Njord Biennale – Colour of Sound

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 29th January 2016
  • Great news! After a very long Christmas break, Nordophile is back for 2016 and will continue to introduce to Nordophiles many different Nordic talents. But we aren’t the only ones who are are here! Last year in the summer we featured the up-and-coming Njord Biennale – Copenhagen Festival and in 2016 it’s arrived! From 28th January […]




    Great news! After a very long Christmas break, Nordophile is back for 2016 and will continue to introduce to Nordophiles many different Nordic talents.

    But we aren’t the only ones who are are here! Last year in the summer we featured the up-and-coming Njord Biennale – Copenhagen Festival and in 2016 it’s arrived!

    From 28th January to 1st February Copenhagen is going to explode with Colour & Sound from Nordic contemporary artists.

    “With a focus on timbre in music and color tones in the visual arts, the biennale brings together a number of cross cultured composers, visual artists, musicians, directors, etc. in Nordic collaboration on a number of cross artistic projects.”

     

     

    Programme

     

    NJORD Biennale has a clear aim to focus on the interaction between the tonal colors of music and colour tones of visual art. To live up to this aim, we have gathered a group of composers, artists, musicians, and directors etc. to create cross-artistic projects with a common Nordic tone.

    The festival´s programme offers five nights of concerts and three exhibits that will unfold the vision of this year´s theme. The programme is broad in scope  – both the well known and established as well as the new generation of composers are represented in NJORD´s diverse selection. Concert formats and content varies; from grand opera productions over experimental ensemble concerts with visuals, to intimate solo and duo performances.

     

    Featured Artists

     

     

    photo; Maarit Kytöharju

     

    Aliisa Neige Barrière (b. 1995) was born into a French-Finnish family in Paris, where her music studies have included violin, piano, chamber music and choral as well as orchestral conducting.

    The passionate chamber musician has participated in projects and master classes throughout Europe and America, and moving musical from the Baroque to the latest music.

    In Denmark Aliisa Neige Barrière helped to create the new Hindsgavl Nordic Chamber Orchestra and has participated in chamber music festival Open Strings.

    In the year 2011-2012 she studied violin with Renee Jolles in New York at the Preparatory Division of Mannes College of Music, as well as orchestral conducting and chamber music. As a winner of the Concerto Competition she played the first movement of the Khachaturian Concerto in March 2012 at Symphony Space, New York.

    After having received her Performance Diploma at the Conservatoire à Rayonnement Régional, she returned to New York in 2013 where she was awarded a full scholarship for four years of studies at Mannes College of Music, where she studied for 2 years with Lewis Kaplan and Laurie Smukler (violin), Michael Adelson and David Hayes (conducting) playing also in the Mannes Baroque Players under the direction of Nancy Wilson.

    As a passionate chamber musician, Barrière has participated in a great variety of projects and masterclasses throughout Europe and the United States, and is interested in all music from baroque to contemporary.

    Her recent engagements have included solo, conducting and chamber music appearances. She most recently conducted Stravinky’s L’Histoire du Soldat at Mannes College and is also a founding member of the new Hindsgavl Nordic Chamber Orchestra in Denmark and has participated in the Open Strings Chamber Music Festival both as a performer and in assisting in artistic programming.

    Since her move to Norway, her projects have included taking part in the celebration of the 80th birthday of pianist Liv Glaser in an all Mozart program on period instruments, under the direction of Bjarte Eike, and also producing and leading a special project, For Peace We Stand meant to unite musicians against barbary in the world.

    Aliisa Neige Barrière plays a 1717 violin by Claude Pierray.

     

    Avanti! Photo: Marco Borggreve
    Avanti! Photo: Marco Borggreve

     

    Finnish Avanti! Chamber Orchestra is a quite extraordinary artistic powerhouse! The ensemble was founded in 1983 on the initiative of Esa-Pekka Salonen, Olli Pohjola and Jukka-Pekka Saraste, and since 1998 clarinettist Kari Kriikku has been artistic director.

    Today Avanti! is renowned as one of the best ensembles for new music in the world. The ensemble specializes in no particular genre; rather, it is proud to be a specialist in all styles with a strong sense of responsibility for the music of today.

    Avanti! works in close partnership with front-line international conductors, soloists and composers, and has won many prizes and widespread acclaim from audiences and critics all over the world.

    The concerts at NJORD Biennale 2016 are the first time ever Avanti! Chamber Orchestra will perform in Denmark.

     

    photo; Nikolaj Lund

    photo; Nikolaj Lund

     

    Bjarke Mogensen (b.1985) This Danish accordionist at the age of 13 made his debut as a soloist in a German TV broadcast with the Munich Symphony Orchestra.

    In 2011, Bjarke Mogensen had his solo debut at Carnegie Hall, New York, and in 2012 he received 1st prize in the prestigious European Broadcast Unions “New Talent” competition in Bratislava.

    Bjarke Mogensen studied at the Royal Danish Academy of Music as a pupil of Geir Draugsvoll and today he teaches chamber music at the same place.

    He has given solo concerts all over the world from New York to Moscow, from Iceland to Turkey. He has performed chamber music with violinists Augustin Dumay and Gidon Kremer and cellist Andreas Brantelid. As a soloist he has worked with orchestras such as the Moscow Virtuosi, Kremerata Baltica, Slovak State Philharmonic Orchestra, The Tiroler Symphony Orchestra, the Danish National Symphony Orchestra and the Copenhagen Philharmonic, conducted by maestros such as John Storgårds, Francesco Angelico, Rafael Payare, Lan Shui, Rolf Gupta, Leos Svarovský, Beat Furrer and Vladimir Spivakov.

    A long succession of collaborations with prominent living composers has resulted in many new compositions – concertos, chamber music and solo works – dedicated to Bjarke Mogensen.

    Bjarke Mogensen’s repertoire is almost unlimited, with a span ranging from folk music and accordion classics over his own arrangements and transcriptions to brand new works for accordion.

     

    asa_gudjonsdottir_photo_guðmundur_ingo-lfsson (1)

    photo; Guðmundur Ingólfsson

     

    Asa Gudjonsdottir from Reykjavik, Iceland, came into a family devoted to the arts. Beginning her studies at the age of 3, and instantly became mesmerized with the instrument. At the age of 12, Asa was admitted to the Reykjavik Conservatory, ultimately leading up to her acceptance at the prestigious Icelandic Academy of the Arts where she studied with Auður Hafsteinsdottir. Asa has cultivated her talent with wonderful musicians, of which includes Routa Kroumovitch at Stetson University, Boris Kuschnir, in Vienna, and Anton Miller at the Hartt School of Music where she graduated with Masters in violin performance.

    Asa regularly performs in concerts and music festivals in Europe and United States, as a soloist and as a chamber musician. Her recent performances have included appearances at Scandinavia House in New York, Lincoln Center in New York, Icelandic embassy in Berlin and Washington D.C. She is a recipient of the Visa cultural award in Iceland, Fulbright Foundation and the American-Scandinavian Foundation.

    Asa’s latest concerts feature performances at the contemporary music festival, “Dark Music Days” in Reykjavik, Iceland, the “Mostly Nordic Concert Series” in Seattle in May with her duo, the Amaranth Duo, Mendelsohn Violin Concerto with the Icelandic Youth Orchestra and a premiere of Depo Flux, concerto grosso by Ken Steen at Lincoln Theater in Connecticut.

     

    jakob_kullberg_foto_charlotta_miranda

    photo; Charlotta Miranda

     

    Jakob Kullberg has been praised internationally for his performances of the modern cello concerto,  living in Paris, he is one of the most active and diverse young Danish instrumentalists.

    Jakob studied in a.o. Amsterdam, London, Zagreb, Vienna and Copenhagen, with Harro Ruijsenaars, Dmitri Ferschtman, Valter Despalj, Mats Lidström, Morten Zeuthen and Anner Bylsma.

    Top prize winner at international solo and chamber music competitions, twice winner of the Danish Grammy, most recently in 2013 for his concerto CD ’Momentum’ which was also nominated for the coveted Gramophone Award in London and chosen for ’Album of the Week’ with Q2 Music, New York.

    In 2011 he was awarded the ’Gladsaxe Music Prize’ and has been artist in residence for, amongst others, the Tivoli Garden Concert Hall, the International Carl Nielsen Violin Competition and New Music Orchestra, Poland.

    Jakob’s recent debut with The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra in London as well as with Ensemble Intercontemporain at one of their inter-sessions in Paris received excellent reviews, and he looks forward to concerto debuts with the Bergen Philharmonic and the BBC Philharmonic Orchestras. He is scheduled to record Per Nørgård’s Remembering Child with Sinfonia Varsovia in December 2014. In the 2016/17 seasons he will embark on a two-CD recording project with the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by John Storgårds comprising concertos by Saariaho and Nørgård as well as the two cello concertos by Shostakovich.

    He has returned frequently to prestigious international festivals such as the Aldeburgh Festival, the Warsaw Autumn Festival, the Huddersfield Festival and Bergen International Festival.

    Jakob enjoys a unique working relationship with the Danish composer Per Nørgård, who has composed and dedicated numerous works for him; the two have developed a rare dialogical collaboration in which the composer utilises the creative potential of the cellist in an experimental composition process. He is also a notable interpreter of the work of Bent Sørensen and in 2011 he moved to Paris to focus on his collaboration with Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho.

    As a teacher Jakob has garnered attention giving masterclass internationally at for instance, the Royal Academy of Music in London, the Norwegian Academy of Music and the Karol Szymanowski Academy of Music in Poland, and has held a teaching position at the Royal Danish Academy of Music since 2005.

    In 2013, he was appointed to the Norwegian Artistic Research Fellowship Programme and has been the artistic director of the Open Strings Cello Academy since 2004.

    For more information and other featured artists head over to njordbiennale.com

     

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    Screen City Festival – Stavanger, Norway

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 10th September 2015
  • Screen City festival 15th-18th October “an expanded cinematic experience about Labour in Norway” will be dedicated to presenting the moving image in public spaces and to exploring the relationship between moving image, sound, and architecture. The festival’s format expands the borders of cinematic experience – reflecting upon the line between the filmatic and the non-filmatic.     […]




    Screen City festival 15th-18th October “an expanded cinematic experience about Labour in Norway” will be dedicated to presenting the moving image in public spaces and to exploring the relationship between moving image, sound, and architecture. The festival’s format expands the borders of cinematic experience – reflecting upon the line between the filmatic and the non-filmatic.

     

     

    Screen City – Moving Image Festival Stavanger presents: Labour & The City In-between. Artists Harun Farocki, Antje Ehmann, Rosa Barba, and an extended list of Czech and Nordic video artists takes over the city, October 15-18th 2015: exploring the temporal, motional and spatial qualities of labour in our current post-industrial climate.

     

    Stavanger, Norway

     

    Curated by Daniela Arriado (CL/NO).

    The point of departure for this year’s program is the post-industrial climate we meet in Europe today. This climate has left us with fluctuating definitions of labour, exploitation of labour, and an unknown economic future. How do these industrial changes affect a city`s architectonic and social rooms? Through the streets of Stavanger, from the Concert Hall to the old industrial port, you will find artworks activating the buildings’ facades. Every building tells a story, and these stories form our city. With the aim of transforming buildings from objects into subjects, we have invited artists – who explore the temporal, motional and spatial qualities of labour in our current post-industrial climate – to present their works in the public spaces of Stavanger.

     

     

    la•bor

    to perform labor; work.
    to strive, as toward a goal; work hard
    productive activity, esp. for the sake of economic gain.
    physical or mental work, esp. of a hard or fatiguing kind.

    The point of departure for this year’s program is the post-industrial climate we meet in Europe today. This climate has left us with fluxuating definitions of labour, exploitation of labour, and an unknown economic future. How do these industrial changes affect a city`s architectonic and social rooms? Through the streets of Stavanger, from the Concert Hall to the old industrial port, you will find artworks activating the buildings’ facades. Every building tells a story, and these stories form our city. With the aim of transforming buildings from objects into subjects, we have invited artists – who explore the temporal, motional and spatial qualities of labour in our current post-industrial climate – to present their works in the public spaces of Stavanger.

     

     

    Old industrial port where  several of the works will be presented

     

    Featured Artists

    Ane Hjort Guttu (NO)

    ARTIST TALK & PREVIEW SCREENING: TIME PASSES
    FRIDAY 16 OCTOBER, 2-4PM
    ROGALAND KUNSTSENTER

    Ane Hjort Guttu presents her recent film related to her investigation into issues of power, freedom and the role of art and artists within political systems. Time Passes (2013) is a 45 min film produced for the 2015 Festival Exhibition in Bergen. Time Passes portrays the art student Damla and her ongoing performative project – begging in the streets of Bergen. Ane Hjort Guttu is an artist, writer and curator based in Oslo. Through video works, picture collections, sculpture and photography her recent work has focused on the issues of power and freedom in the Scandinavian post-welfare state. She also writes analytical as well as poetical texts, and several of her projects discuss art and architectural history.

     

    Photo credit; Ane Hjort

     

    Nils Henrik Asheim (NO)

    ORGELNATT
    FRIDAY 16 OCTOBER, 9-11PM
    STAVANGER CONCERT HALL

    Composer Nils Henrik Asheim (b.1960) combines his career as a performer with regular artist collaborations on projects integrating spatial and theatrical elements. Asheim started out as a pupil of Olav Anton Thommessen and made his début as a composer at the early age of fifteen. Since 1991 Asheim has lived in Stavanger where he is active as a composer, performer and organizer, and not least as the principal initiator of the founding of Tou Scene, an alternative centre for contemporary arts. From September 2012, Asheim has been the organist at Stavanger Concert Hall. Orgelnatt – Organ Night – is a concept where Nils Henrik Asheim invites guest musicians to create a concert event around the organ, exploiting the instrument’s ability to create vast soundscapes. With the help of time and space, we invite the audience to submerge themselves in sound. Orgelnatt has since 2013 been hosted by Stavanger Konserthus. During Screen City Festival, Nils Henrik will perform together with Slovakian artists Pjoni (SK) and Ján Šicko (SK), transforming the concert hall and the organ into an electro-acoustic landscape utilizing mechanical midi management of the organ, and processing sounds from this. The production is part of the Orgel Night program, presenting Norwegian sound artists and musicians like Kjetil Brandsdal and Susanna Wallumrød. The evening will melt into a club program curated by Tou Scene: Electro Motives, presenting live DJ sets by André Bratten (NO) and Jennifer Cardini (FR)

     

    Photo credit; Nils Henrik Asheim

     

    Knut Åsdam (NO)

    MOBIL EGRESS
    DAILY, 6PM-MIDNIGHT
    LORRY, RYFYLKEGATA/MATHALLEN

    Mobil Egress is a touring lorry; an architectural art/film/cinema installation with the film Egress built inside the back compartment. It functions as a mobile cinema and is built up from installation elements to create an architectonic environment. The piece merges art and film distributed in an unusual way. It looks at contemporary Norway and its psychology through themes of work, class, oil and the material world. Egress is a narrative set in a gas station in the edge-lands of Oslo. The main characters work at the bottom of the oil company hierarchy and are engulfed in the everyday and the dark economic and psychological shadows of their society. Egress is the story of a young woman who deals with her everyday work situation with independence and stubbornness in her work and life in the periphery of the city. The film shows relationships between control and independence, about labour, class and work, but it is also a poetic film about a socially insecure edge-land of the city—and about a psychological flip side or cost of the everyday, somewhere near the bottom of the huge economic ladder of the oil industry which secures Norway’s stability. Knut Åsdam lives and works in Oslo, Norway.

     

    Photo credit; Knut Asdam

     

    Beathe C Rønning (NO)

    MEDITATIONS ON WORK III
    DAILY, 6PM-MIDNIGHT
    ROGALAND KUNSTSENTER

    For the past eight Beathe C Rønning has been filming manual and mechanical work processes. What interests her in these Meditations is the choreography that comes straight from the body, and from the routine operation of machines. Or that doesn’t. In practical terms, Meditations on Work is a three-channel video piece with a specially composed soundtrack, a soundless video composition showing sequences of people at work overlaid with scrolling text (II), and a booklet with stills and text. Each sequence is prosaic and commonplace, rooted in the here and now. The steady pulse of work that goes on around us all the time. For Rønning, it is here we find the greatest poetic potential, because here the beauty is subtle yet accessible. “Work is of two kinds: first, altering the position of matter at or near the earth’s surface relatively to other such matter; second, telling other people to do so.” (Bertrand Russell) An artist’s work falls between the manual and the abstract. Rønning neither give nor follow orders. She observes, films and reflects, refining impressions through the rhythm of composition, the pulse of the soundtrack, the focus of the text. “Copenhagen, Kvinesdal, Torp, Oslo, Berlin, Lier, Drammen, Sande: I must thank everyone who has allowed me to film them, and for all the goodwill I have met with.” (Beathe C. Rønning) During the Screen City Festival, Beathe will present Meditations on Work – edition 3, with a newly composed text. The work is presented on the Rogaland Kunstsenter facade window. (Credits: Peter Cribbs.no)

     

    Photo credit; Beate C Ronning

    For more information about other events taking place at #Screencity and the full range of artists appearing or taking part please head to 2015.screencity.no

    We would also like to thank Screen city for their text and photos.

    Featured image credited to Mirjam Struppek 

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    NJORD Biennale – Copenhagen Festival

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 31st August 2015
  • Nordophile is pleased to present another Nordic culture event which brings together different genres into a celebrated collaboration. NJORD is Copenhagen´s innovative new biennale for new Nordic music, art and culture. It offers new music, electronics, visuals, dance, installations and workshops – all presented at untraditional venues all over Copenhagen. NJORD Biennale will have its […]




    Nordophile is pleased to present another Nordic culture event which brings together different genres into a celebrated collaboration.

    northern_lights_nature_photo-e1434964546168

    NJORD is Copenhagen´s innovative new biennale for new Nordic music, art and culture.

    It offers new music, electronics, visuals, dance, installations and workshops – all presented at untraditional venues all over Copenhagen.

    NJORD Biennale will have its inaugural run from 28th of January – 1st of February 2016, where the meeting of music and visual art will be put under the microscope by a string of distinguished composers, musicians and artists.

    The relationship between the tonal colours of music and the colour tones of visual art are examined through concerts, exhibits, a separate children´s programme, seminars and lectures when NJORD 2016 takes centre stage in Copenhagen under the headline SOUND – COLOUR – MOTION.

     

    Kaukainen rakkaus

    Photo; Sakari Viika

     

    Composer in Residence

    The Finish composer Kaija Saariaho is this year’s Composer in Residence at NJORD New Nordic Music Biennale 2016 and her work will be presented to the audience in a series of concerts and exhibitions.

    Kaija Saariaho (born 1952) is one the most significant composers of our time. Her music is characterised by transparent, organic and expressive soundscapes – often created combining electronic compositions with acoustic music.

    At NJORD a number of Kaija Saariaho’s works will be performed and contextualised, using both the works of other composers as well as visual art and dance. Furthermore, NJORD has commissioned a completely new work by Saariaho, which will be presented for the first time during NJORD 2016. Saariaho herself will also play an active role in the development of the sound and art workshops for children that will be held during and after the Biennale.
    Thus, NJORD 2016 is the most comprehensive presentation of Kaija Saariaho’s work ever seen in Denmark, and as such NJORD Biennale affords Danish audiences a unique opportunity to experience this world-class composer in a variety of constellations and surroundings.

    NJORD 2016 is built upon the artistic idea of a convergence between music, colour and movement. A theme that proposes a cultural event of the senses, where the tonal colours of music and colour tones of visual art will saturate the historical as well as modern architecture of Copenhagen.
    For this purpose, Kaija Saariaho’s music is an obvious and most relevant choice. Saariaho is known for combining acoustic and electronic music focusing on sound and timbre, and her works reaches across genres into the visual arts, dance and theatre.

     

    2011_Kaija-Saariaho-ved-sit-arbejdsbord-3_Foto-Priska-Ketterer_Farve_631-Kb-636x1024

    Photo; Priska Ketterer

    Before Saariaho became a composer she was a student of music and art. Hence, the intersection between these art forms has always been an important fixture in her oeuvre. Often she draws inspiration from outside the realm of music – be it in the night sky, nature, art or literature.

    ”While I sat there listening, I suddenly began to see colours and colour formations moving through the orchestra while they were playing – just as seeing the northern lights moving across the sky. Colours changing as great formations moves in gentle strokes across the horizon – this was how these colour formations moved through the orchestra as they were playing Saariaho’s music.”
    Organiser of NJORD Biennale, Jane Schwarz, about her first experience with Kaija Saariaho’s music.

    Kaija Saariaho studied composition by Paavo Heininen at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki, with Brian Ferneyhough at Freiburg Musikhochschule and at IRCAM in Paris, where she has been living since 1982.

     

    KaijaSaariaho_2014_2_Maarit-Kytöharju

    Photo;Maarit Kytöharju

    Kaija Saariaho has received a number of awards and prizes for her music including the Nordic Counsel Music Prize in 2000, the American Grawemeyer Composition Award, one of the most prestigious awards in the world, in 2003, Musical America Composer of the year 2008, the Léonie Sonning Music Prize in 2011, awarded to her at a concert with Danish National Symphony Orchestra, and in 2013 the Polar Music Prize alongside Senegalese singer and politician Youssou N’Dour.

    For more information which is being released over the next few weeks, head to NjordBiennale.com

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    Kunsthal Aarhus – DUMP!

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 23rd August 2015
  • 1536

    Nordophile is constantly searching for Nordic art centres/projects and festivals who work tirelessly to promote and showcase art, artists and their efforts to promote thought through their work. The collaborations that we have brought you all have a dedication to the art, fully. Sometimes unstructured, sometimes unrestrained but always fully committed. We encourage Nordophiles to combine their Nordic […]




    Nordophile is constantly searching for Nordic art centres/projects and festivals who work tirelessly to promote and showcase art, artists and their efforts to promote thought through their work. The collaborations that we have brought you all have a dedication to the art, fully. Sometimes unstructured, sometimes unrestrained but always fully committed. We encourage Nordophiles to combine their Nordic travels with some of these art exhibitions and festivals so you fully appreciate being in and part of the Nordics.

    Nordophile have come across Kunsthal Aarhus which is a contemporary art centre located at the heart of the city of Aarhus, Denmark: cutting edge art, landmark architecture, intimate atmosphere.

     

    Ny "løbebane"
    Ny “løbebane”

     

    The institution initiates, commissions, produces and presents art at an international level to local, regional, and international audiences. Kunsthal Aarhus creates art in a broad context, connected to other fields of human activity, other disciplines, and to a wider society as part of a sustainable approach.

    It provides a research-based participatory, collaborative and transdisciplinary platform for artistic experimentation and critical engagement. Kunsthal Aarhus strives to be an inclusive, transparent, dynamic and flexible institution that fosters the culture of appreciation and values diversity of contributions.

     

    Shaped Canvas Track

    Come and try Kunsthal Aarhus’ running track.

    Shaped Canvas Track is designed by the Dutch artist/designer duo Jeroen Bouweriks & Linda Beumer and was selected from a Call for Ideas in the summer of 2013. The selected project is inspired by the American minimalist icon Frank Stella and the Danish middle distance runner Wilson Kipketer, and in this way it combines art and sport.

    With its red rubber surface the track is perfect for a 50 metre sprint from the J.M. Mørks Gade street to Kunsthal Aarhus’ new entrance. The stripes of the track wrap around the old building becoming a hybrid between landscape architecture, sport, design and art.

    This fascinates City Architect from Aarhus Municipality, Stephen Willacy:
    “The selected team has created a very inspiring project. They have been able to create a temporary artwork, which guides the visitors with humour and clear design, but also respects the existing architecture.”

    The artists, Jeroen Bouweriks & Linda Beumer say:
    “We believe in the unexpected combination of disciplines, and that this can result in interesting dynamics. The idea of walking, running with a certain goal – in this case to the entrance – can become a game or a challenge. Why not facilitate this motion with an unusual track in a contemporary art context. It’s the mixture of these two worlds that can appeal to different kind of visitors.”

    Lars Nielsen, Chief Coach for the National Athletics team who has been a consultant on Shaped Canvas Track explains his interest in the project:
    “It combines sports and arts, and for me these are two elements with a lot in common. Both demand the same to get you to the top level, and that is commitment. You have to think in new ways, seek inspiration and make use of other people’s ideas.”

    The project marks the start of the new phase of the transformation of Kunsthal Aarhus, connecting the development of its new artistic profile with its architectural features:
”With this project we are rethinking the idea of the future art institution, and how to transform Kunsthal Aarhus into a more open and accessible institution that is connected to the wider world. Imagine if people will literally be able to run in and out of Kunsthal Aarhus and merge the experience of the art programme inside with the outside” – add Joasia Krysa, Artistic Director and Iben Hofstede, Administrative Director of Kunsthal Aarhus.

    Shaped Canvas Track can be experienced until 2017 and is the first commissioned art project in Kunsthal Aarhus’ new public programme “Museum Without Walls” (2015-2017) comprising of a series of new artworks developed specifically for urban context and participatory projects developed through social media.

     

    Current Exhibition

    DUMP! 26.June.2015-20 Sept.2015

    Collective Making series at Kunsthal Aarhus presents a new exhibition curated by Elaine Gan, Steven Lam and Sarah Lookofsky.

    DUMP! gathers together artists, scientists and organisms to explore multispecies collaboration that reshapes the ruins of modernity and resists industrialized progress. Contesting the celebratory logics of invention and making that dominate contemporary discourse, DUMP! creates an arena for waste, obsolescence, and decomposition, where practices of nurturing and collective cultivation may begin, turning composts to compositions.

     

     

    DUMP! upends the division between nature and culture, while refusing separations between art and science; the art institution and the natural history museum; and wonder and comprehension. By presenting creations of humans and nonhumans alike, DUMP! calls out for new ways of seeing, describing, making, and living in unruly entanglement within contaminated worlds.

    Inspired by Lucy Lippard, a self-described “compiler” of exhibitions, and taking its cue from garbage heaps – and the multispecies life that ferments and flourishes in them – the exhibition will continue to grow throughout its duration.

    The exhibition is sited in and between two locations: Kunsthal Aarhus and Søby Brunkulslejerne – a post-mining landscape of contamination, garbage, and unruly multispecies transformation. Both places will host projects, proposals, artifacts, and concepts compiled along two strands of overlapping inquiry that constitute the DNA and organizing principles of the show:

     

     

    Unmaking Making:
    There is a utopian and almost naive celebration of the creative maker in this era of crisis and extinction – a heroic figure invoked as alibi for economic recovery and sustainability by policymakers and governments. DUMP! proposes that the seduction of making, which also often goes unexamined in the field of art, dangerously reinforces a techno-positivist neoliberal logic of accumulation, which has accelerated the ruinous buildup that is threatening the very possibilities of collective life.

     

    Multispecies Collaboration:
    The ecological crisis facing the planet evokes an apocalypse that can be rationalized and mapped. DUMP! proposes that its key challenge is messy: nature and culture, humans and nonhumans can no longer be taken apart. Plants, fungi, animals, microbes challenge us to reconsider the unruly, rogue, invasive, and unspectacular compilers that hold things together, in effect playing across difference. DUMP! challenges the story of human domestication and mastery with murky, multispecies heaps.

     

     

    Workshop

    Aarhus University Research on the Anthropocene (AURA) and Kunsthal Aarhus host a weekend workshop with creative methods and experimental genres for living in contaminated landscapes, garbage dumps, and compost heaps of the Anthropocene. Led by Niels Bohr Professor Anna Tsing and Professor Nils Bubandt of Aarhus University, Department of Culture & Society, AURA research combines the arts, sciences, and humanities to ask: how might humans and nonhumans continue to inhabit a damaged planet? How might “we” collectively make and unmake livable relations?

    The workshop is organized in conjunction with an exhibition currently on view at Kunsthal Aarhus, curated by Elaine Gan (AURA), Steven Lam (Purchase College, NY), and Sarah Lookofsky (Museum of Modern Art, NY). Over a weekend, the workshop will gather seven different artists-scientists from the exhibition in a series of performances, tastings, presentations, and roundtables. A short story by Ursula K. Le Guin, The Carrier Bag Theory of Fiction provides a rich conceptual framework. (Guests are invited to enjoy reading the short piece in advance.)

     

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    5 September, the workshop opens with a welcome at 10.30am, followed by a curatorial introduction to the exhibition. This will be followed by an AURA presentation on ongoing field research at the brown coal mining beds in Søby Brunkuslejerne. Around noon, Åsa Sonjasdotter (Sweden/Berlin) will lead a potato harvest and share insights on historical trajectories of potato varieties. In the afternoon, Cecilia Vicuña (Chile/NY) will talk about seed collecting and the beings of seeds in Chile and Denmark. This will be followed by Semiya 2015 town hall, an open celebration of seeds and stories. All guests are then invited to take a short break to eat Sonjasdotter’s potatoes harvested in the morning, along with some local beer brews. In late afternoon, Pawel Wojtasik (NY) will do a screening and open discussion on his experimental documentaries and works in progress.

     

    6 September, the workshop reconvenes at 13.00pm, with an open seminar by Etienne Turpin (Jakarta/Berlin) on postnatural histories. This will be followed by a short presentation by Amy Balkin, calling in from San Francisco, CA. At 15.00pm, roundtable discussion among all participants will be held. This roundtable will engage with Le Guin’s short story through three key themes: (a) the work of art and archives as carrier bags in a time of unprecedented environmental crises, (b) problems of scale and narrative, and (c) the representation of species temporalities and differential ontologies through various media (performance, poetry, film, writing). A tasting/cooking event by Spurs collective will be held in the early evening.

     

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    Invitation to become involved

    Collect seeds in late summer
    Examine the particularities and origin of the seeds you find
    Contemplate and love the seeds, share your notes, drawings or photos of them

    Saturday, September 5th at 3 pm at Kunsthal Aarhus, citizens are encouraged to bring their seeds as contributions to a realization of “Semiya”, a 1971 work by the artist Cecilia Vicuña during her visit to Aarhus. Citizens (including scientists and artists) will observe, present and discuss the seeds. Dinner will be served.

    In 1971, Cecilia Vicuña proposed the work “Semiya” to Salvador Allende, the socialist Chilean president who died in the military coup that deposed him two years later. The proposal involved the collection of seeds throughout the country for a gathering and nationwide celebration of seeds. Allende smiled and said the country was not prepared, but perhaps would be by the year 2000. Since the work was never realized at the time, the artist is calling for participation for a realization of the work in 2015 in Denmark in conjunction with the exhibition DUMP! at Kunsthal Aarhus:

    “My idea is very simple: To encourage people to gather seeds as an act of love and contemplation. The collection may be performed during the late summer (August). On the 6th, we will join with and meet others who have been gathering seeds, to engage in a collective conversation. I will contribute with poetry readings and researchers will talk about the current situation of seeds in a global perspective, their loss of habitat and freedom due to the interference of transgenic crops that disturb or contaminate wild and native species. The event will feel like a town hall with people of all ages.

     

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    Online
    Document your collection of seeds on social media (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Flickr, Vine) and use the hashtag #semiya2015. All these seed posts, if they are assigned as public, will automatically gather on the website; https://tagboard.com/semiya2015/231493

     

    At Kunsthal Aarhus
    For the exhibition DUMP! at Kunsthal Aarhus, the artist created the work “Seed Quipu” containing both seeds, recently collected by the artist in Chile, and seeds collected in Aarhus. New seeds will join the installation following the event. Both “Seed Quipu” and the Danish enactment of “Semiya” are created in close collaboration the researchers Meredith Root-Bernstein and Marilena Campos of AURA (Aarhus University Research on The Anthropocene).

     

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    About the artist:
    Cecilia Vicuña is a poet and multidisciplinary artist from Chile. Her work embodies the meeting point between art and poetry, text and textile, the body and the land. Her ritual performances/site specific installations bring together the oral traditions of the Andes, science and linguistics to meet the contemporary realities of ecological disaster. Vicuña’s art has been exhibited in New York at the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Museum of Modern Art, at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Chile, and at the Institute of Contemporary Arts and the Whitechapel Art Gallery in London. Her most recent book is Spit Temple, 2013. Vicuña is a founding member of Artists for Democracy.

    Head to Kunsthalaarhus.dk for information on DUMP! and other exhibitions.

    Thank you to Kunsthal Aarhus for text and photos.

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    LIAF – Norway

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
  • 14th August 2015
  • 9bNBnIpd

    Lofoten International Art Festival takes place in the municipality of Vågan in the Lofoten archipelago – August 28 – September 27. LIAF is a festival for contemporary art taking place in Lofoten a cluster of islands located on the North West Coast of Norway, just above the Arctic Circle, every second year. The festival was first […]




    Lofoten International Art Festival takes place in the municipality of Vågan in the Lofoten archipelago – August 28 – September 27.

    LIAF is a festival for contemporary art taking place in Lofoten a cluster of islands located on the North West Coast of Norway, just above the Arctic Circle, every second year. The festival was first initiated in 1991, as a local art exhibition with a broad range of expressions and with a regional profile. From 1999, the festival was given an international profile changing the name to Lofoten International Art Festival, and since 2009, the festival has been run by The North Norwegian Art Center (NNKS) and LIAF’s artistic advisory board.

     

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    LIAF presents works by international artists in a local and site-specific context and seeks to be an open, experimental and including meeting place for artists, audience and locals. LIAF acknowledges the complexity of place and seeks to be a discursive, engaged and social platform for different positions creating a dialogue between the local and global. The prospect of developing and discovering new knowledge and understanding through art is the core of the festival. LIAF is not connected to a permanent location or space, but is invented anew every time by infiltrating and moving into already existing structures: Everything from a garage, a library, a shed, a bunker, a fish drying rack, a private house, a shop or an old warehouse. New curators also develop the festival every time, with diverse backgrounds, ideas and practices and in different ways bringing the familiar and unfamiliar together. By insisting on this open and experimental approach, we believe LIAF can be a place for exchange and involvement on multitude levels, every time revealing new things about our world and ourselves.

     

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    LIAF has taken place eight times since 1999 presenting artists like Gillian Wearing, Lawrence Weiner, AK Dolven, Ken Lum, Olafur Eliasson, Mari Slaattelid, Elmgren & Dragseth, Gardar Eide Einarsson, Pipilotti Rist, Geir Tore Holm, Eija Liisa Athila, Jesper Just, Amar Kanwar, Tori Wrånes, Michel Auder, Kjersti Andvig, John Giorno, Lene Berg, Lindsay Seers, David Horvitz, Mahmoud Khaled, HC Gilje, Karl Larsson, Shilpa Gupta, István Csácány, Lisa Tan and many more.

     

    Markus_Selg

    Markus Selg

     

    LIAF curators have been Tor Inge Kveum, Per Gunnar Tverbakk, Vibeke Sjøvoll, Gry Ulrichsen, Göran Christenson, Maaretta Jaukkuri, Taru Elfving, Richard Borgström, Helga-Marie Nordby, Thora Dolven Balke, Linn Pedersen, Anne Szefer Karlsen, Bassam El Baroni and Eva González-Sancho.

     

    Kjell Ove Storvik-LIAF 2013-9054

    Kjell Ove Storvik

     

    Disappearing Acts 2015

    Titled Disappearing Acts, LIAF 2015 will take its thematic basis on ideas of human agency disappearing through the processes of history, ecology, and technology. This approach is informed by the context of the Lofoten Islands, with its precarious economic-environmental dependency, its highly marketable “screensaver” scenery, and its cultural legacy of self-sufficiency and retreat from the antagonism of the urbanised world. Organised as a large-scale group exhibition, Disappearing Acts will feature 25–30 international artists, with many works commissioned especially for LIAF 2015. The exhibition will also be accompanied by a full public programme and publication.

     

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    Venue

    The “Jern & Bygg” premises in Svolvær serves as the main venue for LIAF 2015. Jern & Bygg was a family-owned hardware store and furniture outlet that operated continuously from 1948 to 2010. The business developed through the decades and new sections were repeatedly added to the original building. When it closed in 2010, it had expanded to a scale of 3,500 square meters across several floors. The history of the premises runs parallel to the post-war history of Norway and Lofoten, from the expansive rebuilding after WWII, the rise of Social Democracy, the re-creation of Norway as a petrostate in the ’70s, the discontinuation of industrial production, monopolization of the fishing industry and subsequently the gentrification and touristification of the new millennium. The building is now the last example of pragmatic waterfront architecture in Svolvær. After LIAF 2015, the building will be demolished.

    The North Norwegian Art Center (NNKS) is a juncture institution for Northern Norway responsible for presenting contemporary art and arts and crafts. NNKS is an artist-run institution owned by The North-Norwegian Visual Artist Association (NNBK) and The North Norwegian Craft Association (NKNN).

     

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    Curators for 2015

    Matt Packer is a curator and writer currently based in Northern Ireland. He is Director of CCA (Centre for Contemporary Art) in Derry~Londonderry, and an Associate Director of Treignac Projet in France. Packer says he is delighted to have the opportunity to co-curate LIAF 2015: What makes LIAF so unique is not only the spectacular scenery and sociability of the Lofoten Islands but also its remarkable history of developing artistic dialogues that extend outwardly from Lofoten and into other arenas. As a festival, it has a restless ambition to think through new models of curatorial approach at a time when the formula for larger-scale biennale-type contemporary art events seems ever more standardized. As such, I’d like to think that curating LIAF 2015 will not only be a conversation about art and artists but a conversational experiment in public practice.

     

     

    Arne Skaug Olsen is a curator, art critic and writer based in Bergen in Norway. He is a regular contributor to Nordic online web journal for art criticism, kunstkritikk.no, and has published writings in Camera Austria, Klasskampen, Billedkunst and Kunstjournalen B-Post, among others. Skaug Olsen is also excited: It is an honor to be trusted with the task of co-curating the next LIAF, one of the most important recurring art events in Norway. I have followed the biennale closely, and on two occasions been part of the LIAF crew, in different capacities. It´s a privilege to now be a part of the festivals history, and to shape it´s future. Lofoten is truly a unique place, especially because of all the open minded and welcoming people in the region, but also because their outspokenness and their interest in art and culture. Conversations in Lofoten are never dull, and I´m looking forward to participate in the ongoing dialogue with the people of Lofoten about what role art and artist should play in their community, and beyond.

     

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    Featured Artists

     

    Anna Ådahl (b.1973 in Stockholm, Sweden, lives and works in Stockholm and London, UK) studied at Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux Arts de Paris, France. Her works spans performance, film and installation. Ådahl’s work has been presented at Taiga Space, St. Petersburg, Russia (2014); Botkyrka Konsthall, Stockholm (2013); WELD, Stockholm (2013); FRAC Champagne-Ardenne, Reims, France (2013); Palais de Tokyo, Paris, France (2012); Centrum för Fotografi, Stockholm (2009); and Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennal, Niigata-Ken, Japan (2006).

     

    LIAF ANNA ÅDAHL2

     

    Roderick Hietbrink (b.1975 in Gorssel, the Netherlands, lives and works in Oslo, Norway and Amsterdam, the Netherlands) holds a MFA from Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam. Hietbrink’s work span video installation, film, performance, objects and photography, investigating aspects of the psychology and inherent conflicts between the rational and instinctive self. His work has been exhibited at Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Centre Pompidou, Paris, France; De Appel, Amsterdam; Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam; Artspace Visual Art Centre, Sydney, Australia; and the 5th Moscow Biennale, Russia.

     

    Roderick Hietbrink_Fear, Anger, Sadness, Joy

     

    Sam Basu (b.1967 in London, UK, lives and works in Treignac, France) is the Director of Treignac Projet, an exhibition and workshop project established in 2007 together with Liz Murray. Sam Basu works predominantly with sculptural installation and architectural-research projects, with a particular interest in the relationship between esoteric and activist approaches to counter-culturalism. He often works in collaboration with other artists, including Shahin Afrassiabi, Francis Upritchard, and Matt Bryans. Basu’s work has been presented at Glucksman Gallery, Cork, Ireland; Camden Arts Centre, London; and Laing Gallery, Newcastle, UK.

     

    The Actual Possibility of Escape

     

    Jon Benjamin Tallerås (b. 1984 in Oslo, Norway, lives and works in Oslo) graduated from the Oslo National Academy of the Arts in 2011. His work spans different media, including photography, video, sculpture, performance, text and installation. Tallerås investigates urban space, exploring hidden and often non-used areas of the city. His sculptures are often made out of found materials. Tallerås is one of the co-founders and curators of the project space One Night Only. He has exhibited his work at Akershus Kunstsenter, Lillestrøm, Norway (2014); Kunsthall Oslo (2014); Oslo Kunstforening, Oslo (2013); Gallery BOA, Oslo (2013); and NoPlace, Oslo (2011).

     

    Experiments, Propositions, Decay and Deterieration (2015)_3

     

    Steinar Haga Kristensen (b.1980 in Oslo, Norway, lives and works in Oslo) studied at the Oslo National Academy of the Arts, Akademie der Bildenden Künste, Vienna and at Sydney College of Art. Haga Kristensen’s work seeks to unveil the positive lingual potentiality inherent in the exuberant modernity. He often stages theatricalised spectatorship and mannerist sculptural repetition. He is one of the founding members of the artist group D.O.R. Haga Kristensen has presented his work at WIELS Contemporary Art Centre, Brussels; Etablissement d’en face projects, Brussels; Kunsthall Oslo; Gallery Rod Bianco, Oslo; The Danish Pavilion at the 54th International Art Biennial in Venice; Witte de With, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Dortmund Bodega, Oslo; Gallery Niklas Belenius, Stockholm, Sweden; Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde, Denmark and Young Artists’ Society (UKS), Oslo; and Bergen Kunsthall, Bergen, Norway.

     

    The Loneliness of the Index Finger (Part II)

     

    www.liaf.no

    www.nnks.no

    Photos supplied by LIAF.

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    Helsinki Festival

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
  • 7th August 2015
  • ISO_Carmen_credits_Janne-Mikkila

    Helsinki Festival is the largest arts festival in Finland, organised annually in late summer. The festival’s aim is to make art accessible for all. In 2015, the Helsinki Festival is arranged from August 14-30. The Night of the Arts is arranged on 20 August 2015.   Compañía Kaari & Roni Martin; KILL Carmen   Featured events […]




    Helsinki Festival is the largest arts festival in Finland, organised annually in late summer. The festival’s aim is to make art accessible for all.

    In 2015, the Helsinki Festival is arranged from August 14-30.
    The Night of the Arts is arranged on 20 August 2015.

     

    ISO_Carmen_credits_Janne-Mikkila

    Compañía Kaari & Roni Martin; KILL Carmen

     

    Featured events

    Art goes Kapakka

    Ten days, ten nights and more than 300 events taking place across Helsinki’s bars, restaurants and cafes. Art goes Kapakka brings together interesting and insightful art, the city’s finest gastronomic delights and some fantastic crowds – and is a chance for established artists to preview their latest ideas and newcomers to do some profile raising.

    Throw yourself in and enjoy unforgettable AgK moments in the dark August nights. The long-awaited programme is due to be announced in summer 2015. See you there!

     

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    30th Helsinki Comics Festival

    This year, the largest comic festival in Northern Europe is also turning its gaze toward Asia and moving its normal timetable up by one week. The special themes for 2015 are zines and small press, Hong Kong and Korea. The programme will include, e.g., a comic market, Small Press heaven, comic artists, gallery exhibitions throughout the city, discussions, lectures, live drawing sessions, competitions, animations, a children’s programme and evening clubs.

    sarjakuvafestivaalit.fi

    In co-operation with:
    Suomen sarjakuvaseura, Sarjakuvakeskus artgoeskapakka.fi

     

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    Helsinki Night Market

    At last! After two years of waiting, the Helsinki Night Market offers the possibility of tasting insects. More than ten different street stalls set up with a variety of night-time delicacies from traditional Asian treats to more exotic flavours. This year, insect food cooks from Shanghai conjure up snacks from all kinds of insects.

    Inside the red-brick yard, there is a diverse and zany combination of art forms, glow-in-the-dark lions and dragons, and of course, live music. There are also activities for the smaller members of the family. The event continues on Friday!

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    In co-operation with:
    The Abattoir (Teurastamo), Centre of International Cultural Exchange, Chinese Ministry of Culture

     

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    Searching for Janne

    In honour of the 150th anniversary, students from the Theatre Academy read the Sibelius biography by Erik Tawaststjerna in pop-up events all over the city. Find yourself in situations that uplift beyond everyday life in unexpected locations throughout the Festival!

    Performed in Finnish.

    In co-operation with: Theatre Academy OP

     

    ISO_Janne

     

    Giants

    Enormous, eight-metre giants come to life at Night of the Arts! Where are they from? How did they get here and why? Helsinki Festival and Helsingin Sanomat join the city residents in welcoming these rare guests with open arms. Join in the fun of building giant wicker beings in free workshops co-ordinated by EMMA. The event will culminate in the giants coming to life, and that can happen only with your help!

    Night of the Arts thu 20.8.
    The Giants come to life at Senate Square at 19.00

    Concept, production: BeNoît Mousserion & Bérangère Pajaud, Cie l’Homme debout

    Co-operation: EMMA – Espoo Museum of Modern Art

    In partnership with: Helsingin Sanomat

     

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    Susanne Sundfør; Color Dolor

    Dramatic, elegant, cinematic, unapologetic, inspiring. These adjectives, among others, have been used to describe Susanne Sundfør, a young talent at the top of the charts in Norway. Sundfør, 29, has already recorded six albums and collaborated with the Norwegian group Röyksopp and the French group M83. Sundfør has moved from nostalgic folk music to dark pop and gloomy electronic music. Her newest album, Ten Love Songs, is like Kate Bush meets disco.

    The warm-up act for the evening, Color Dolor from Helsinki, leads you into a vortex of experimental, dream-like and unexpected soundscapes. Underneath the wild sound, there is classy, dynamic pop playing that is guaranteed to lift your dancing feet off the floor.

    Color Dolor starts at 7 p.m. Susanne Sundfør starts at 8.15 p.m.
    Doors: 6 p.m.

    For this event you can purchase a meal by Restaurant Juuri beforehand!

    Age limit: 18

    ISO_SusanneSundfor_PressImage-credit-Luke-Gilford

    credit Luke Gilford

     

    Director of Helsinki Festival – Erik Söderblom

    The Tree Booms

    Boom 1: Changing China

    Circus, dance, design, rock, symphony, cartoons, kites and street food. As part of the 2015 Helsinki Festival, we present Focus: China, one of the most comprehensive looks at Chinese culture seen in Europe over the past years. We are not interested in how different or exotic the Chinese are as such, but rather how similar we humans ultimately are.

    The world has changed China. Now China is changing the world at a pace. If you dig deep enough in Finland, you get to China, they say. The 2015 Helsinki Festival provides you with shovels for the exploration.

    Boom 2: Changing musical theatre

    Theatre changes, music changes, dance changes. Perhaps musical theatre is the art form which, in embracing the world, ultimately best describes our multifaceted modern reality. This has been understood by the modern generation of composers – more than 20 of them are currently working on an opera or musical theatre project. Finland is experiencing a well-hidden musical theatre boom! The 2015 Helsinki Festival programme contains a small part thereof: three premieres of Finnish musical theatre works.

    Boom 3: Continuing agent of change

    The Huvila Festival Tent, the agent of change in the city’s music scene, celebrates its 20th anniversary! Over the years, this Tokoinranta landmark has fed the fires of passion, introduced new artists of all sorts and launched one star after another into the musical sky of Helsinki. And it will do so this summer as well. The agent of change continues!

    In this landscape of change, after six festivals, I bid farewell to the wonderful audience of the Helsinki Festival with this year’s programme and welcome my successor, Topi Lehtipuu.

    The world is changing – art makes the transition easier.

     

    Erik2-c-Sasa-Tkalcan

    photo; Sasa Tkalcan

    Check out Helsinki Festival

     

     

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    Danish artist – Claus Thurøe

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
  • 21st July 2015
  • -Night Fly- - 80 x 80 cm

    Danish artist – Claus Thurøe was born and lives in one of Denmark’s culture cities, Copenhagen. Known for its embrace of artists, Claus has nurtured his career here to go on to specialise in Landscapes, which are shown through his solo exhibitions.       We spoke with Claus and asked him to take us through […]




    Danish artist – Claus Thurøe was born and lives in one of Denmark’s culture cities, Copenhagen. Known for its embrace of artists, Claus has nurtured his career here to go on to specialise in Landscapes, which are shown through his solo exhibitions.

     

     

     

    We spoke with Claus and asked him to take us through his history and how his talent has evolved.

     

    I have been creating art since 1983 when I started with collages of paper.
    1986 was the year I started painting. First on plates then on canvas in 1989. I have over the years made paintings inspired from the industrial environments, Japan, the Faroe Islands, natural landscapes cityscapes and people.

    Back 1987 I visited Israel for a month and spent my time sketching and drawing.

    After returning home, I was more focused on my style and used acrylic on masonite. This turned into a series of portraits.
    The following month I started painting with acrylic on canvas and depicted the industrial environment, sports, theater and other subjects under the title Figurative Cubism.

     

    1-timo-moto-on-his-mothers-back-claus-thuroe

     

    In 1991, I was in Japan for 3 months. There I was fascinated by the old Japanese woodcut prints Ukiyo-e. I visited many ukiyo-e exhibitions and decided to work with motifs from a Cubist perspective.

    I have now painted Cubist Ukiyo-e since 1990 and still enjoy it  to this day. I find it inspiring especially because I can see that my style evolves and the paintings change expression.

    In 2008, I was asked to illustrate children’s and workbook “Timo Moto adventure” with my Japanese paintings. This resulted in a series of paintings.

    In that period, I have also visited the Faroes several times and tried to express my experiences in my work. My Faroese paintings, allow me to show the magnificent natural scenery and the interaction between it and the man-made constructions upon it.
    In 2010, I began to combine the Japanese and Faroese landscape in a kind of “Landscape Fantasy”.

    In 2014, I visited New York and this inspired my work with cityscapes.

     

    cityscape-with-tower-claus-thuroe

     

    I then started to paint significantly different from my previous paintings where I previously had a far tightened control of painting. The new design choices challenge me with the many striking colour contrasts and the heavy brushstrokes. During the process, the paintings seem fairly chaotic for me, where I eventually tighten up the result. This appeals to me a lot.

    I try now to combine the old buildings with the modern buildings that are springing up everywhere these days. The urban skyline is changing forever these days.

    I’m very inspired by Copenhagen and other European medieval cities. Their random urban design with nice big beautiful buildings, where the atmosphere is reflected by colours. I portray but also depict the small streets and squares, and quirky spaces. The buildings dark windows capture the imagination and ask the question  “what happens there, what life is lived there”.

    I visited New York in 2014  and tried to capture the city’s historical ambience. The city is almost done on a drawing board, but despite its wide open streets and squares, there is a high degree of proximity. I made my Nordic comment to New York in 12 paintings.

    Early in 2015 I decided to try to illustrate through my paintings, the electronic sense and the electronic human in the digital age. The digital society today is very individual in all directions. This resulted in a series of paintings in which I plan to continue working within this style.

     

    the-village-in-the-west-claus-thuroe

     

    Exhibitions

    Denmark in Museums, exhibition halls, galleries and art fairs.
    Exhibitions in Norway, The Faroe Islands, Japan, USA.

    I have received a Danish scholarship “De Bielkeske Legater”.

    Check out ct-art.dk for more information

     

    Upcoming Exhibitions 

    Solo exhibition at Gentofte Townhall, Copenhagen. August 2015.
    Gentofte.dk

    Exhibition in Gallery Habsø, Midtjyllands Kunst Center. October 2015
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    Christmas exhibition at The Peter Faber House, Copenhagen. December 2015

     

    Paintings 

    Gimignano” – 130 x 150 cm
    Inspired by San Gimignano, which is an Italian city located in Tuscany.
    San Gimignano was in 1990 UNESCO World Heritage Site because of it’s well-preserved and unique medieval architecture.

     

    Gimignano - 130 x 150 cm.

     

    View from Brooklyn Bridge” – 80 x 80 cm
    Inspired of New York, when I was walking to Brooklyn on The Bridge.

     

    -View from Brooklyn Bridge- - 80 x 80 cm

     

    Dome” – 60 x 80 cm
    Inspired of The Marble Church in Copenhagen. It was build 1749-1894 and is landmark for a part of Cph. called “Frederiksstaden” (Frederik City).

     

    -Dome- - 60 x 80 cm

     

    Night Fly” – 80 x 80 cm
    The digital human having an evening stroll in cyberspace

     

    -Night Fly- - 80 x 80 cm

     

    E-Links” – 80 x 80 cm
    The digital human creates connections crisscrossing

     

    -E-Links- - 80 x 80 cm

     

    Watch a video about Claus https://vimeo.com/115210998

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    Københavns Internationale Teater

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , , Leave a comment
  • 17th July 2015
  • metropolis1

    Københavns Internationale Teater is the primary force behind international performing arts in Denmark. By applying our huge international network and in close collaboration with local institutions and partners our organisation has produced more than 50 international festivals, workshops and seminars etc. presenting more than 1500 invited artists, ensembles and companies over the past 30 years. […]




    Københavns Internationale Teater is the primary force behind international performing arts in Denmark.

    By applying our huge international network and in close collaboration with local institutions and partners our organisation has produced more than 50 international festivals, workshops and seminars etc. presenting more than 1500 invited artists, ensembles and companies over the past 30 years.

    Copenhagen International Theatre seeks to constantly break the established notions of art and performing arts by presenting completely new genres and trends within performing arts in the broadest sense. On the whole, we wish to create a unique variety of performing arts, which excites and inspires Danish audience and professional arts communities alike.

    The all important cultural expression, the living, the original, the infinite and the vital are important keywords for Copenhagen International Theatre, which is precisely why we, in 2007, launched a new festival which will run until 2017.

     

    metropolis4

    The Playground by Groupenfonction, Tours. www.groupenfonction.net

     

    Metropolis – Festival for art & Performance in urban space 12-30 August

    With Metropolis, Copenhagen International Theatre moves out of the settings of the traditional theatre and into the city in order to create art, life and debate on the creative city. Over a 10-year period, METROPOLIS will challenge and transform urban space through artistic experiences, which play with the boundary between everyday life and staging. That the international art concepts are subject to rapid development is evident with a festival as Metropolis, where the focus is on art experiences in the public domain.

     

    Some featured artists….

    Snorejunglen by Karoline H.Larsen, Copenhagen  14 – 30 Aug. weekdays 13-20 hrs, weekends 10-20 hrs
    Where; Skt. Thomas Plads, Frederiksberg
     Ticket; For free

    A colourful forest of strings.

     

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    We move into a majestic and beautifully landscaped place with 100 kilometres of rope and string in all colours. From 14 August the place transforms into a monumental work of strings pulled between the trees. An anarchistic work which develops gradually day by day during the festival, ultimately created by its visitors.

    From a distance, you see the structure as a colourful installation, but you can also pull the strings, make new connections and transform the work. You can even climb into the installation and let yourself envelop by the kaleidoscopic jungle of strings.

    Visual artist Karoline H. Larsen eradicates the distinction between art and game, and between spectator and artist. She transforms and stages urban space together with the visitors and reinstates the opportunity for playfulness and creativity in the city.

    Support; Statens Kunstfonds Projektstøtteudvalg for Billedkunst and the Municipality of Frederiksberg
    Photo; Karoline H. Larsen

    www.creativeactions.com

     

    Tape Copenhagen by Numen/For Use, Vienna 15 – 23 Aug. 10-22 hrs
    Where; Nikolaj Kunsthal, Nikolaj Plads 10, Kbh K
    Ticket; 50 kr at the entrance

    Crawl inside a giant cobweb of tape.

     

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    Numen/For Use takes over the large colonnade in Nikolaj Kunsthal with their tape installation, which has already created astonishment and admiration in a.o. Paris and Melbourne. They stretch thick layers of transparent tape and stick it together, 40 km in total, in order to build this giant cocoon, which floats high up between the pillars. Just as unbelievable and geometrically precise as a cobweb.

    The artists behind the installation are a collective of designers and set designers who challenge the actual shapes of architecture and let us physically feel the material. The result is spectacular installations, hybrid constructions and organic mazes in scaled up proportions anchored between the existing elements of the building.

    You can go and just have a look at this fragile transparent construction, or you can crawl through its cavity and let yourself immerse in a physical and floating experience. Like a fly caught in a spider’s web.

    Support; In collaboration with and supported by Nikolaj Kunsthal
    Photo; Numen/For Use

    www.numen.eu

     

    Engram by Osynliga Teatern, Stockholm. 20, 21, 23, 27, 28 & 30 Aug., weekdays 15 & 16.15 hrs, sundays 13, 14.30 & 16.15 hrs
    Where; In front of Vor Frue Kirke, Nørregade 8, Kbh K
    Ticket; 50 kr

    What if you only had 640 breaths left.

     

    metropolis2

     

    The story begins in the serene and beautiful cathedral. The soundtrack is made up of memories and reflections which unfold while you walk the narrow streets of Copenhagen. The voices in your ears were recorded just a few days before the persons on the tape passed away. They lay bare their lives in sound memos, recorded for us who are still alive. The story is not just about them, but about all of us. The whole city participates. It’s like watching a movie while simultaneously being in it.

    The walk is an intimate radio documentary in a live setting, and it offers you the chance to reflect on your life and all the things we take for granted. Imagine if you had just 640 breaths left. What would you miss the most about life? Long distance travel for adventures? Or the same old humdrum with cold and grey Mondays? Engram lets you experience the world as if there is no tomorrow. An informal tribute to life.

    NB! In English
    Photo; Jonas Eng

    Credits;
    Direction Tomas Rajnai, Jens Nielsen
    Production partner Tim Hinman/Third Ear
    Cast Jo Rideout, Stefan Marling, Joanna Dahlgren
    Support The Swedish Arts Council, Nordic Culture Fund, Nordic Culture Point and The Swedish Arts Grants Committee
    Engram Copenhagen is a collaboration between Tim Hinman/Third Ear and Osynliga Teatern

    www.osynligateatern.se

     

    Contemporary Circus

    Copenhagen International Theatre also continues its involvement in one of the newer performing arts, Contemporary Circus. Back in 1987 Copenhagen International Theatre introduced this new genre to the Danish audience and has since organised annual contemporary circus activities. Since 2005, Copenhagen International Theatre has organised Contemporary Circus Festivals, which now are set to continue in August every other year (2016), all while we continuously focus on contemporary circus development activities in co-operation with Danish, Nordic and European partners.

     

    circus1

    www.kit.dk

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    Flow Festival – Helsinki

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , , Leave a comment
  • 16th July 2015
  • header_anim4

    Flow Festival – Helsinki will be taking place on 14th – 16th August 2015. Flow Festival has become synonymous with bringing music from old school legends to topical newcomers. Beyond the music, Flow, offers a warm embrace of the arts and an exceptional array of world spanning cuisine. Only a short walk away from the […]




    Flow Festival – Helsinki will be taking place on 14th – 16th August 2015.

    Flow Festival has become synonymous with bringing music from old school legends to topical newcomers. Beyond the music, Flow, offers a warm embrace of the arts and an exceptional array of world spanning cuisine. Only a short walk away from the centre of Helsinki, the festival strikes an alluring setting for a few days of blissed-out festival escapism. There’s easily enough to keep attendees occupied, if ever spending a summer weekend in culture hub Helsinki wasn’t enough.

     

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    One of the cultural experiences on offer is the Art programme. In collaboration with the University of Arts Helsinki, Flow presents a broader arts programme than ever before with one-off commissions, installations and pieces around the whole festival, both indoors and out. The exhibition space Art Laboratory captures the experiential nature of art. The Voimala building will house the interactive VJ-installation of the Excerpt group along with the video installation of the Pink Twins brothers, who create their art by toying with electronic music and visual arts. Once again, Flow welcomes their Artist of the Year. This year Riitta Kopra has been commissioned to create a piece of art for the festival area, using materials from previous festivals. The University of the Arts will also contribute to Flow’s children’s afternoon with a series of workshops led by dance and theatre pedagogy students.

     

    arts

     

    The University of the Arts will create the Art Laboratory, which houses sound sculptures, video installations, and sound art, as well as on-stage concerts and experimental performances. The concerts take an open-minded dive into the world of improvisation and interactive shows engage the audience. Performance art is featured right next to the Art Laboratory.

     

    A few of the featured artists…….

    Vohm combines 1970s minimalism with 2010s electronic music, creating repetitive, growing sound walls and textures. The music is in constant motion but not in a rush to get somewhere. The harmonious and repetitive material is perfect for immersive listening and letting your thoughts wander.
    Vohm is the solo project of Helsinki-based composer, musician and sound designer Ville Aalto. Aalto has worked as a composer, producer, and musician for such groups as Rev and K!NG. K!NG released its debut album in October 2014.

     

    Art_VOHM_optimoitu-500x280

     

    Viialainen is a performance and sound artist who explores the field of conceptual arts, our way of experiencing the immediate and the conflict between our senses and the intellect. His mission is a performance, which combines opening, magic, realism and love. The performance situation and expectations will crumble. Fragments create light and light creates flames. The tools of the upcoming work are frequency, rage, reflection and hands. Viialainen performs with timpanis, bell plates and mirrors.

     

    Art_TimoViialainen_optimoitu-500x280

     

    IKIHEVONEN is an improvisational psychedelic post rock band. The group focuses on its very free and reactive playing, having roots in blues and expanding their musical approach towards the infinite possibilities of psychedelic atavism. The group started as a free form jamming session following the rule ‘You can’t do wrong in IKIHEVONEN’. The players regard the group as a spaceship of sorts, where participation and devotion are the fuel and the ride itself the goal.

    The members of IKIHEVONEN are: Anders Bergman, Kalle Leino, Tuomas Niemi and Antti Ruuhela.

     

    Art_Ikihevonen_optimoitu-500x280

     

    Artist and photographer Erno-Erik Raitanen works with sound, installations, sculptures and radios. He was born in Lahti, and has studied in the UK and USA before entering the master program at the Time and Space Arts department at the University of the Arts Helsinki. “Finlandia” is a radio transmitted (FM 98,0) sound collage, which consist of recordings of Finlandia collected from flea-market vinyls and online.

     

    Art_ErnoErikRaitanen_optimoitu-500x280

     

    Antti Kytömäki is a Helsinki-based artist. He is interested in sound and movement as the elements of sculptures. At Flow Festival, he will present a sculpture “Untitled”, which is a piano prepared with DC motors that is triggered by the presence of the viewer, filling the space with its intervening resonance. The piece playfully comments on the tradition of western avant-garde compositions, automatic music or even the saloons of western films, as well as extends the auditive possibilities of traditional instruments anchored to the 12-tone harmonic system.

     

    Art_AnttiKytomaki_optimoitu-500x280

    www.flowfestival.com

     

     

     

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