Lights in Alingsås

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 14th October 2015
  • The Lights in Alingsås festival opened on September 25th and runs through to November 1st. Just 40 minutes outside of Gothenburg, this light festival is definitely a must see this Autumn. Visit the festival to see and witness some incredible light displays and installations around Alingsås.   Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin   It started in 1999 […]




    The Lights in Alingsås festival opened on September 25th and runs through to November 1st. Just 40 minutes outside of Gothenburg, this light festival is definitely a must see this Autumn. Visit the festival to see and witness some incredible light displays and installations around Alingsås.

     

    Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin

     

    It started in 1999 when students from HDK, Jönköping University and Gothenburg University gathered in Alingsås to experiment with different lighting designs for public buildings. The following year, the municipality entered into agreements with the Professional Lighting Designers’ Association – PLDA, who have brought the international world of lighting design to Alingsås every October since then. The result is an educational and fun lighting event which has grown annually.

    – Already in the early years the Municipality of Alingsås showed a huge interest in lighting, which was matched by interest from an international audience. Today, Lights in Alingsås welcomes more than 85 000 visitors annually. “We are obviously very proud,” says Kjell Hult, Development Manager at Alingsås Municipality and one of the initiators of Lights in Alingsås.

     

    Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin

     

    Children are our future

    Children Lights is running for the third year in a row.  The 2015 overall theme is notoriously Evolution of Light, and the Children’s Future Park is a part of it. The installations kids create symbolizes their own thoughts about the future, what they hope for and what they imagine.

    – Our heart burns for Alingsås, and we totally support everything that makes it better to live here. Brilliant Children, Children’s Future Park and Children’s bright are exciting new features of this year’s light festival. As the main sponsor of the Lights in Alingsås we are extremely pleased with this year’s children’s initiative, says Klas Fresh, Sparbanken Alingsås.

     

    Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin

     

    Bright children

    New this year is the “Bright Child” – a playful place for all children to experience this scene, where Malin Wallin, designer and drama teacher has created a playful place for all children. Malin Wallin explains:

    “Children have gathered at the lit up trees and house. Here they have started to play. There are light fairy tales and houses which can dance. This illuminates the play and everyone can join in. Everyone gets to be a part of the light from now and into the future, from the heart to the world. ”

    The scene Bo

    Malin Wallin has also created an interactive scene in the park in the form of the creature Bo, where children can create shadows in the gap at Bo. With the stage, she has wanted to attract up to play on the scene, one can create shadows in the gap and from there to become part of the installation. Future bright for Malin is the children’s own lighting force, to light today and into the future is a material to play with, able to create and shape of. A material to experiment with, discover and enjoy.

    Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin 

    Light Designers

    A new group of lighting designers have gathered in Alingsås to start the creative work of Lights in Alingsås in 2015. The theme is “Evolution of Light” and will take visitors on a journey through time in light characters and highlight major finds of all time. Together with Professor Jan Ejhed working at KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, the designs do a deep dive into the history of light to find interesting finds and phenomena to work along with this year’s loop. Audio will also this year be part of the installations and composer Sebastian Studnitzky from Germany will lead the creative process of creating the right sound with this year’s designs.

     

    Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin

     

    This year’s lighting designer is Anna Sbouko from Greece, Kevan Shaw from Scotland, Roberto Corradini & Marco Palandella from Italy, Reinhard Germer from Germany, Katja Winkelmann from Germany, Andrea Hartranft from the US and Catherine Hennig from Sweden.

    Another exciting year of creation has begun in Alingsås which you will get to enjoy during the month of October.

    You will also find a workshop at the festival.

    The workshop teaches the theoretical and practical knowledge in lighting design. The main objective is to have a professional lighting designer who will guide participants through the entire lighting process with a fair and full-scale projects. Workshop Week lasts for seven days and supported by the industry with advanced lighting equipment.

     Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin

    This year’s workshop is now full, but there is the possibility to get information about next year’s workshop in advance, please send an email to lights@alingsas.se with contact details and we will contact you when we open registration for in 2016.

    Welcome to Lights in Alingsås in the Autumn! Lightsinalingsas.se

    Thank you to Lights in Alingsas for text and pictures.

    Featured image Robert Persson

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    Tromso on a Budget

  • Guest
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  • 21st September 2015
  • One of our guest bloggers here at Nordophile is back. Vanessa Brune made the move from Germany to Tromso in the Arctic of Norway. Whilst running her own site blogging about life in Tromso, Van also knows the true meaning of being a Nordophile and what Nordophiles want to see and do, so she has […]




    One of our guest bloggers here at Nordophile is back. Vanessa Brune made the move from Germany to Tromso in the Arctic of Norway. Whilst running her own site blogging about life in Tromso, Van also knows the true meaning of being a Nordophile and what Nordophiles want to see and do, so she has started guest writing for us with this in mind. Maybe one day you will make the move as well…….

     

     

    Tromso on a Budget – 10 Free Things to do on your visit

    Hello fellow Nordophiles! I’m so glad to be back again! In case you missed my last post about Tromso, my name is Vanessa and I’m a German expat living in Tromso in Arctic Norway. I blog about my life and travels in Scandinavia and the Arctic over at Snow in Tromso and am here today to spread a bit of my love for Arctic Norway!

    I’m currently a student and living in Norway isn’t exactly the cheapest thing to do. Neither is visiting so I completely understand your worries that visiting Tromso might be too expensive. Therefore, I’m here today to tell you: it is possible to visit the Arctic on a budget! Aside from looking out for cheap flights and booking a private room instead of a room at a hotel, there are a couple of things you can do and see in Tromso completely for free. Today I’m showing you the 10 best!

     

     

    Hunt the Northern Lights

    This is probably the best about Tromso: the Northern Lights. And yes, you can see them for free! Of course, there are Northern Lights tours for tourists which is great when the sky is cloudy and they drive you to less cloudy areas. However if the sky is clear, you’ll most likely see them in the middle of Tromso too! I can see them from my bedroom and I live in the city center! Although, if you want to take really nice pictures of the lights, you’d need to get away from the lights of the city. No problem though as Tromso Island is big and you can get outside of the city within a half hour walk.

     

     

    Experience the Midnight Sun

    Interested in more natural phenomena of the Arctic? If you visit Tromso during summertime, you’ll experience the Midnight Sun (aka 24 hours of daylight) included in your stay. It’s so nice to take a walk around the city centre in the middle of the night while it’s still bright outside.

     

    P1180163dz

     

    Go on a Hike

    Speaking of going on a walk, the Arctic nature can best be experienced outside of the city on a hike through the forests or in the mountains. There are so many hiking routes for you to choose from and all of them are clearly marked. My favourites: walking around Lake Prestvannet, hiking from the Northern tip of Tromso Island to the Southern tip or going up Mountain Storstein or Mountain Tromsdalstind on the mainland.

     

    The Southern Tip of Tromso Island

     

    Visit Perspektivet

    Tromso also has some culture for you to offer and some of it is even for free. Perspektivet, for example, is a photography museum with changing exhibitions – all of them for free!

     

    Perspektivet

     

    Visit the Northern Norway Art Museum & the Gallery of Contemporary Art

    If you’re interested in art, the Northern Norway Art Museum and the Gallery of Contemporary Art should be on your must-see list of places for your Tromso visit. Both are free of charge and both host wonderful Norwegian art you might not be able to see anywhere else.

     

    Gallery of Contemporary Art

     

    Get on board of the Hurtigruten

    Want to see what it’s like to cruise around on Norway’s coastal steamer? The Hurtigruten can be found at Tromso harbour every day from 2.30 to 6.30 pm and can be visited free of charge. You can have a look around the ship, drink coffee in the cafeteria and even use the whirlpool on deck while having a fabulous view on the Arctic Cathedral.

     

    Hurtigruten

     

    Have some Beach Time

    Yes, Tromso has a beach and even though it might not be warm enough to go for a swim during your visit, you should definitely head out to Telegrafbukta anyway. It’s such a beautiful place in the South of Tromso Island and the perfect place for an evening walk at the ocean!

     

    Telegrafbukta - the beach of Tromso

     

    Visit the Botanic Garden

    The Arctic-Alpine Botanical Garden in Tromso is showcasing plants from the world’s Arctic and Alpine regions, like the Himalaya and the Rocky Mountains, and is situated right below the University. To walk through the Gardens is free and should be on your list of things to do if you visit the city between May and October!

     

     

    See Reindeers and Polar Bears

    Tromso is in the Arctic so of course you’ll see reindeers and polar bears! Okay, the polar bear might only be a stuffed one at Mack Brewery but you can also see real reindeers near the University (in captivity) and over on Tromso’s neighbouring island Kvaloya (wild), besides seeing them all over the city centre for decorative purposes.

     

    Reindeer

     

    Take in the view of Tromso from above

    Tromso is such a beautiful place – and even more so if seen from above! The sight of Tromso Island, in the middle of the fjord between the mainland and the island Kvaloya is just so amazing! You can have this view after hiking up Mountain Storstein and as this might be a tough hike not exactly suitable for less well-trained people, you can always go for a much easier hike from the University to the ski jumping tower and look at the mainland and great parts of Tromso from that one. The views will be equally nice, promised!

     

    Tromso from above

     

    You see, Tromso might be in the Arctic and one of the most expensive countries of Europe, but it’s definitely possible to visit the city and see a lot while being on a budget!

    If you want to read more about Tromso and my life in Arctic Norway, head on over to Snow in Tromso and leave a comment below telling me what you’d like to do if you’d visit Tromso one day!

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    Iceland Writers Retreat

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 21st August 2015
  • writers-retreat-2

    Nordophile has dedicated this week to Nordic literature. We have interviewed Sara Blaedel, featured The Nordic Literature Prize awards, asked questions to some of your favourite Nordic authors on our Twitter page and showcased some Nordic book fairs and festivals coming up later this year in some of the Nordic cities. To round of this […]




    Nordophile has dedicated this week to Nordic literature. We have interviewed Sara Blaedel, featured The Nordic Literature Prize awards, asked questions to some of your favourite Nordic authors on our Twitter page and showcased some Nordic book fairs and festivals coming up later this year in some of the Nordic cities.

    To round of this special week, we are bringing you Iceland Writers Retreat. For many writers a retreat is where it all begins, nurturing an idea, engaging with other writers and building the confidence to put pen to paper.

    Could you be funded to attend?

    The Iceland Writers Retreat Alumni Award has been funded to support one writer with outstanding potential to attend the Iceland Writers Retreat in Reykjavik, Iceland in April, 2016.

     

    IWR_logo

     

    The Event

    The third annual Iceland Writers Retreat will feature small workshops and panels by renowned authors, focusing on the art and craft of writing. Through exclusive trips and talks by local writers, it will also introduce participants to Iceland’s rich literary tradition. Between sessions, we’ll offer you time to find inspiration and write in an unforgettable setting as well as show you some of Iceland’s natural and cultural sites.

     

    Workshops and Panels; Over the course of the retreat, each participant will be enrolled in a total of five small-group writing workshops (max.15 participants) led by internationally acclaimed authors, a Q&A panel with all faculty, and numerous readings and social functions.

     

    Where and When?

    The third annual Iceland Writers Retreat will take place in Reykjavik April 13 – 17, 2016.

     

    A07-Blue Lagoon

     

    The Founders

    ELIZA REID owns and operates a company specializing in event management and marketing communications. She is also a writer and editor and has been published in numerous magazines and newspapers in the UK, U.S., Iceland, and her native Canada. Eliza holds an honours BA in international relations from Trinity College at the University of Toronto and an MSt in modern history from St. Antony’s College, Oxford University.

    Eliza’s current and past projects include working as the editor for Icelandair’s inflight magazine, Icelandair Info; copy editor, writer, and marketing consultant for many of Iceland’s largest organizations; and project manager for successful international conferences in Reykjavik.

    Eliza has lived in Reykjavik, Iceland since 2003. She has travelled extensively and published about experiences as varied as almost being stranded in Timbuktu and dining with strangers in Uzbekistan. She lives with her husband and their four energetic young children.
    Visit her at www.elizareid.com.

     

    EE8

     

    ERICA JACOBS GREEN has worked in book publishing for nearly twenty years. A graduate of UC Berkeley with a BA in English, past highlights of Erica’s publishing career include positions as a children’s book editor at Chronicle Books, founder of Ever After Studios (a book production company), and Director of Publishing at Discovery Channel (Discovery Communications). As a freelance writer and editor, her articles and short stories have appeared in anthologies, newspapers, and online. Erica has worked with award-winning authors and illustrators as well as an array of famed brands for children and adults: from Jane Goodall to Star Wars and Dr. Oz to Williams Sonoma.

    Today, Erica is a Senior Editor at National Geographic in the children’s book group. She also is the Co-Founder of the Iceland Writers Retreat and is at work on a novel. Originally from California, Erica spent eight years abroad as an American expat, including two years in Iceland. She recently moved back to Washington, DC where she now lives with her husband and two small children in a house full of traveler’s artifacts. http://ericajgreen.wordpress.com/

     

    Iceland Writers Retreat_at Cityhall_0. Image by Roman Gerasymenko

     

    So what actually happens at the retreat?

    TIME TO WRITE: We’ve dedicated blocks of time for writers to focus on writing. Participants can choose to stay in the quiet hotel or wander over to a café in town. We’ll provide a list of the best coffee shops and libraries for writing.

    EXCLUSIVE RECEPTIONS: Iceland wants to welcome you. We hope that, as in previous years, participants will be invited to cocktail receptions hosted by local embassies and Icelandic leaders, and will confirm details closer to the event.

    MUSIC, FOOD, & MORE: Late night offerings include a chance to hit the streets of Reykjavik to see live music, listen to readings by local writers, and dine at some of Reykjavik’s best eateries. And you’ll be well fed: IWR enrollment includes breakfast, three lunches and one dinner, plus coffee during breaks and cocktail receptions.

    [The Retreat] included many interesting activities outside of the workshops.” Heidi, Australia, 2015 participant

    “RELAX & WRITE” OPTIONAL EXTENSION: Once you’ve been inspired by Iceland and by the writing workshops, why not spend some additional, quieter time in Reykjavík to work on your writing and enjoy the continued company of some of your fellow writers? The optional “Relax & Write” two-day extension includes two additional nights’ accommodation. You have free time during the days to take additional tours, walk through town, shop for souvenirs, or write in a local café. The group will then gather in the evenings for dinner together. At the second dinner, we’ll have an open mike night where you’ll have an opportunity (if you wish) to share some of your own work with your fellow IWR participants.

     

    IWR_2015_062_©_Roman_Gerasymenko

    photo; RomanGerasymenko

     

    Why Iceland?

    Iceland has a rich literary tradition dating as far back as the nation’s settlement 1100 years ago. The country’s 12th and 13th century sagas — heroic tales of family feuds, adventures and heroism — are revered as both historical and literary works of art and have inspired modern tales from the Lord of the Rings to Wagner’s four operas, The Ring of the Nibelung.

    Iceland’s only Nobel Prize winner, Halldór Laxness, was recognized in the field of literature in 1955. The country publishes more books per capita than any other nation on Earth. And its capital, Reykjavik, is the world’s first non-native English speaking UNESCO City of Literature.

    While it has a strong literary tradition, Iceland’s natural attractions are justifiably world famous. Within just a short drive of the picturesque capital, you’ll find moss-covered lava fields, snow capped peaks, steaming geothermal fields, powerful glacial rivers, and photogenic waterfalls.

    A modern, safe, and friendly country, Iceland is an easy-to-reach destination. It is just a three-hour flight from the UK, and five hours from the East Coast of North America — and stopovers in the country are free for up to a week if you are travelling from one continent to the other with Icelandair.

     

    mynd_e

     

    To find out more information and watch videos from last year’s retreat visit IcelandWritersRetreat.com

    Information about funding IcelandwritersRetreat.tumblr.com

    Special thanks to Eliza Reid for allowing Nordophile to use their text and information.

     

     

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    Routes North

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 11th June 2015
  • routes north

    Nordophile is always looking out for blogs which delve deep into one of the Nordic countries, to encourage Nordophiles to visit. We discovered Routes North, which was founded by Steve Vickers. Steve and his writers go to the places with a fresh perspective and then they bring them to you . Routes North was started […]




    Nordophile is always looking out for blogs which delve deep into one of the Nordic countries, to encourage Nordophiles to visit.

    We discovered Routes North, which was founded by Steve Vickers. Steve and his writers go to the places with a fresh perspective and then they bring them to you .

    Routes North was started to help people discover all of the amazing stuff that Sweden has to offer, regardless of their budget. The site covers the entire country, from cool cities like Stockholm, Gothenburg and Malmö, all the way north to the frozen reaches of Swedish Lapland.

     

    stockholm

    Our destination guides are all researched on the ground by writers who know the country inside-out and speak the local lingo. Apart from money-saving tips and advice on planning a trip to Sweden, you’ll find independent accommodation reviews, detailed guides to museums and other attractions, plus tips on where to eat and drink. Our Sweden forum is the place to get your travel questions answered.

    Routes North is the only Sweden travel guide that pays its own way. We don’t take freebies and we don’t run sponsored posts, so you can always trust what you read on the site.

     

    central-sweden

    Routes North is an independent travel guide to Sweden. Founded in 2014, its aim is simple: to help travellers get the most out of a trip to the country, regardless of their budget. No messing about – just helpful, honest travel advice.

    Unlike the vast majority of publications writing about Sweden, we do not take free stuff or discounts on travel services. Why? Because it means we’re free to say what we really think. All of the hotels, restaurants and attractions featured on this website have been visited in person, anonymously.

    lapland

    Routes North was started by the British journalist Steve Vickers, who has worked on more than 15 guidebooks across Europe and Asia and has spent the past six years exploring Scandinavia with his Swedish girlfriend Karin. Want to say hi? Contact us via Twitter or send us an email at:  routesnorth.com

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    Walk behind Wallander – Ystad, Sweden

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 16th May 2015
  • Ystad street

    Every Nordophile will have that first defining moment when they realised their passion for all things Nordic. For me it was finding the Wallander books, written by Swedish great, Henning Mankell. An interesting man in himself, he seemed to be able to create a character who was multifaceted but likeable at the same time. Could […]




    Every Nordophile will have that first defining moment when they realised their passion for all things Nordic. For me it was finding the Wallander books, written by Swedish great, Henning Mankell. An interesting man in himself, he seemed to be able to create a character who was multifaceted but likeable at the same time. Could his personality and how he communicated with those around him be put down to a cultural difference? Was this how all Swedes were? I was curious, but I was also hooked. Not just by the characters and story lines but by the Swedish backdrop, the food that was mentioned, the traditions and hearing the language. So when these books were suddenly put onto our TV screens I was excited to see if this character could work in 3D and if the descriptions of a small town in Sweden called Ystad was true.

    Ystad street

     

     

    I wasn’t disappointed! The yellow houses, the frosty landscapes, the hot summer haze across the fields (granted slightly muddied by a man who had just been slayed) but that added to it…. Was this what Nordic Noir was all about? Stunning backdrops setting the stage for dark murders.

    I have a lot to thanks the 3 Swedish greats, as I have called them in a previous article. Henning Mankell, Kristen Henrikkson and Kurt Wallander.

    Of course my chances of meeting any of them are quite slim, but….. I can do the next best thing and walk behind Wallander’s footsteps as VisitSweden tells me that I can walk in his footsteps on one of the guided tours.

    As a Nordophile you can indulge whilst on holiday with a trip to Mariagatan in Ystad, go and see Kåseberga, a village that features in ‘Before the Frost’ and ‘Faceless Killers’, you can visit Svarte, where Wallander retires to and spends many a nights sitting out contemplating a case. In fact they tell you about 67 different areas of interest to the Wallander series, that you can visit.

    The best thing about following in his footsteps is that even if you aren’t a Wallander fan, any Nordophile will just love surrounding themselves with the beauty of this region in Sweden.

    www.wallander.ystad.se/en

    www.nordicstylemag.com/2014/08/henning-mankell-swedish-legend/

     

    photo credit: florianplag

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    Nordic Noir Tours

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 13th May 2015
  • A view of Borgen Square

    If you’ve been following some of the best Nordic dramas which have hit our TV screens the last few years you will of no doubt become fans of The Killing, Borgen and The Bridge. Fancy following in Sarah Lund’s footsteps? Marvel at the backdrop in which Birgitte Nyborg ran Denmark or intrigued by the locations […]




    If you’ve been following some of the best Nordic dramas which have hit our TV screens the last few years you will of no doubt become fans of The Killing, Borgen and The Bridge.

    Fancy following in Sarah Lund’s footsteps? Marvel at the backdrop in which Birgitte Nyborg ran Denmark or intrigued by the locations which saw Saga Noren shooting around in her vintage car. But just don’t know where you would start?

    A Nordic Tour

    Don’t worry, because there is a tour which will do all the guiding for you!

    Nordic Noir Tours offers tours themed around the popular Danish television series The Killing, Borgen and The Bridge. We want to blur the line between fiction and reality by showing the film locations of these series as well as telling guests the stories behind the productions and how they were inspired by real events.

    The business started about a year ago and is run by Dieuwertje (Dee), from The Netherlands. Dee moved to Denmark at the beginning of 2013 after she had written her dissertation on film tourism in Denmark. She has a fascination for crime fiction, thrillers and horror films and also guides many of the tours herself.

    Nordic Noir Tours offers open tours on Saturdays and private tours throughout the week. Prices start from 100 dkk per person.

    On the Borgen tour guests will, among other places, visit the exteriors of Christiansborg palace. Here are many recognisable locations that were used for scenes with Birgitte Nyborg and her spin doctor, or shady politicians plotting their plans. The fun part about this tour is that you will also hear about the connection between fiction and reality and, for example, how politics and media inspired the story of Borgen.

    On The Killing/The Bridge tour you get to see a completely different side of Copenhagen, the edgy side of the city. Participants will see lots of film locations from the two series, like the police headquarters. You will also hear about Danish design, Scandinavian stereotypes and, of course, the lovely and quirky Sarah Lund and Saga Noren.

    http://nordicnoirtours.com/

    photo credit ‘Nordic Noir Tours’

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