Lights in Alingsås

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 14th October 2015
  • The Lights in Alingsås festival opened on September 25th and runs through to November 1st. Just 40 minutes outside of Gothenburg, this light festival is definitely a must see this Autumn. Visit the festival to see and witness some incredible light displays and installations around Alingsås.   Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin   It started in 1999 […]




    The Lights in Alingsås festival opened on September 25th and runs through to November 1st. Just 40 minutes outside of Gothenburg, this light festival is definitely a must see this Autumn. Visit the festival to see and witness some incredible light displays and installations around Alingsås.

     

    Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin

     

    It started in 1999 when students from HDK, Jönköping University and Gothenburg University gathered in Alingsås to experiment with different lighting designs for public buildings. The following year, the municipality entered into agreements with the Professional Lighting Designers’ Association – PLDA, who have brought the international world of lighting design to Alingsås every October since then. The result is an educational and fun lighting event which has grown annually.

    – Already in the early years the Municipality of Alingsås showed a huge interest in lighting, which was matched by interest from an international audience. Today, Lights in Alingsås welcomes more than 85 000 visitors annually. “We are obviously very proud,” says Kjell Hult, Development Manager at Alingsås Municipality and one of the initiators of Lights in Alingsås.

     

    Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin

     

    Children are our future

    Children Lights is running for the third year in a row.  The 2015 overall theme is notoriously Evolution of Light, and the Children’s Future Park is a part of it. The installations kids create symbolizes their own thoughts about the future, what they hope for and what they imagine.

    – Our heart burns for Alingsås, and we totally support everything that makes it better to live here. Brilliant Children, Children’s Future Park and Children’s bright are exciting new features of this year’s light festival. As the main sponsor of the Lights in Alingsås we are extremely pleased with this year’s children’s initiative, says Klas Fresh, Sparbanken Alingsås.

     

    Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin

     

    Bright children

    New this year is the “Bright Child” – a playful place for all children to experience this scene, where Malin Wallin, designer and drama teacher has created a playful place for all children. Malin Wallin explains:

    “Children have gathered at the lit up trees and house. Here they have started to play. There are light fairy tales and houses which can dance. This illuminates the play and everyone can join in. Everyone gets to be a part of the light from now and into the future, from the heart to the world. ”

    The scene Bo

    Malin Wallin has also created an interactive scene in the park in the form of the creature Bo, where children can create shadows in the gap at Bo. With the stage, she has wanted to attract up to play on the scene, one can create shadows in the gap and from there to become part of the installation. Future bright for Malin is the children’s own lighting force, to light today and into the future is a material to play with, able to create and shape of. A material to experiment with, discover and enjoy.

    Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin 

    Light Designers

    A new group of lighting designers have gathered in Alingsås to start the creative work of Lights in Alingsås in 2015. The theme is “Evolution of Light” and will take visitors on a journey through time in light characters and highlight major finds of all time. Together with Professor Jan Ejhed working at KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, the designs do a deep dive into the history of light to find interesting finds and phenomena to work along with this year’s loop. Audio will also this year be part of the installations and composer Sebastian Studnitzky from Germany will lead the creative process of creating the right sound with this year’s designs.

     

    Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin

     

    This year’s lighting designer is Anna Sbouko from Greece, Kevan Shaw from Scotland, Roberto Corradini & Marco Palandella from Italy, Reinhard Germer from Germany, Katja Winkelmann from Germany, Andrea Hartranft from the US and Catherine Hennig from Sweden.

    Another exciting year of creation has begun in Alingsås which you will get to enjoy during the month of October.

    You will also find a workshop at the festival.

    The workshop teaches the theoretical and practical knowledge in lighting design. The main objective is to have a professional lighting designer who will guide participants through the entire lighting process with a fair and full-scale projects. Workshop Week lasts for seven days and supported by the industry with advanced lighting equipment.

     Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin

    This year’s workshop is now full, but there is the possibility to get information about next year’s workshop in advance, please send an email to lights@alingsas.se with contact details and we will contact you when we open registration for in 2016.

    Welcome to Lights in Alingsås in the Autumn! Lightsinalingsas.se

    Thank you to Lights in Alingsas for text and pictures.

    Featured image Robert Persson

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    Nordic News Round Up

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 9th October 2015
  • We’ve started looking at Nordic interests and stories which are making their way into our news throughout each week. We know Nordophiles have an interest in all areas when it comes to Nordic genres so are taking this opportunity to let you know about some things which have caught our attention this week and probably […]




    We’ve started looking at Nordic interests and stories which are making their way into our news throughout each week. We know Nordophiles have an interest in all areas when it comes to Nordic genres so are taking this opportunity to let you know about some things which have caught our attention this week and probably yours!

     

     

    We couldn’t end the week without talking about the passing of the legendary and hugely respected Nordic author Henning Mankell. Monday 5th October many woke to the news that he had lost his fight with Cancer. Instantly the respectful outpouring for this author was in some ways unprecedented because not only was this Swedish man one of the most popular authors within the Nordic Noir genre but he was an absolute writer, dedicated to his talent, right until the end.

    He documented his fight with Cancer through his writing for The Guardian, with his last entry being posthumously printed the next day. He wrote about his humanitarian causes which saw him take an active role over the years in trying to right what he believed in and he spoke often through his written words to convey his love and belonging in Mozambique. Henning Mankell brought us Wallander, the Swedish Detective which was equally popular in literature as it was on our TV screens and for many this is where their love and first interest in Nordic crime fiction came from.

    Henning Mankell was a man of substance, a man of passion and beliefs and his work and activity will live on for many years to come.

     

    This week Cinemascandinavia launched the NORDI Awards! After a few years of reviewing, documenting, interviewing and showcasing to us Nordophiles everything to do with Nordic Film we are pleased to announce that this week they decided to let you have your say aswell with regards to the Nordic films and dramas that have got you through the year, and the actors who have made them so great. This is a good opportunity for you to be involved from the very beginning and have your say. Whether you have watched Pilou Asbaek from Borgen to ‘A War’ or have been taken by the performance of  Ane Dahl Torp in 1001 Grams. This is your chance to vote. Did the Norwegian disaster film ‘The Wave’  ignite a new interest in Nordic film in you, or are you waiting with much anticipation for the new series of ‘The Bridge’?  Now is the time to vote! The Nordi Awards Voting Form

     

     

    Nobel Prize in Literature was announced on Thursday 8th October by the Swedish Acadamy. Belarusian author Svetlana Alexievich took the coveted prize making her the 14th woman to win since it began in 1901. She was noted for her “polyphonic writings” by the Swedish Acadamy and praised for her work with her books which they described as “monument to suffering and courage in our time”.

    The Nobel Prize in literature was founded in 1901, 5 years after the death of Alfred Nobel a Swedish Chemist and Engineer. Alfred Nobel was the inventor of Dynamite and an elected a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. After death, it was found that Alfred Nobel had left much of his wealth and assets in a trust which he planned would be used to fund the Nobel Prizes.

     

     

    #NordicDayUSA was filtering through this week on Twitter and it’s all about Combating Climate Change! The five Nordic embassies in Washington DC ( Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Norway) are attending the first ever Nordic Day on October 21st, where they will “discuss common goals and challenges in light of the upcoming Climate Change Conference in Paris.” It’s going to be all about Nordic solutions and fresh thoughts.

    The Nordics are normally at the forefront of innovative ideas and thinking outside of the box to move forward with World concerns, so it will be an interesting Nordic Day to watch and see the outcome of.

     

     

    Nordic Playlist is the place to go for your Nordic music interests. Each week they give us a recommended playlist, interviews, and features which bring us sometime relatively unknown Nordic artists to add to our list.

    This week they interviewed the Norwegian songstress ‘Aurora’. She talks about her upcoming performances in the UK in November and how it feels to finish her album recently. Read the interview here Nordic Playlist – Aurora 

     

     

     

    Finally, we couldn’t let this weeks mentions go by without talking about Nordic Food! With the furore over the Great British Bake Off final this week, Nordophiles yet again looked towards the Nordic food alternatives which we would replace certain British foods with. Cinnamon Bun Day was still fresh in our mind and maybe we’ve carried this National celebrated day on a bit too far into the week with at every opportunity taking a Fika where possible but in our defence it was spurred on after we read the interview in The Sunday Times with Swedish chef Magnus Nilsson.

    The interview starts off with telling us the correct way to pronounce Copenhagen and how so many are saying it wrong, it then delves into the reasons behind Magnus decision to write a Nordic cookbook. He has been described as both “extraordinary” and “acclaimed” so we very much recommend you take a look at the Nordic chefs thoughts and ideas which will only feed your Nordic passion even more! Sunday Times interview

    Well, that’s it for a roundup of Nordic News. Nordophile always welcomes input from our fellow Nordophiles, so if you have a story to tell or information on any Nordic talents/events let us know!

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    ‘What’s On’ SATC NYC

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 1st October 2015
  • Nordophile has been keeping in touch with our friends at the Scandinavian American Theater Company based in New York and wanted to share with you some very important upcoming events which are very much keeping Nordic theatre alive!   Kwasi Osei and Zenzele Cooper from SATC’s Off-Broadway production “Bastards of Strindberg”, photographer Kait Ebinger   […]




    Nordophile has been keeping in touch with our friends at the Scandinavian American Theater Company based in New York and wanted to share with you some very important upcoming events which are very much keeping Nordic theatre alive!

     

    Kwasi Osei and Zenzele Cooper from SATC’s Off-Broadway production “Bastards of Strindberg”, photographer Kait Ebinger

     

    Firstly, we spoke with one of the actors, Christiane Seidel (from Boardwalk Empire) and found out from her what it is like to be part of not only SATC in New York but the Nordic community as well.

     

    Photo credit Christopher St. George.

     

    How did you first become involved with SATC?

    As a half-Dane, I had excitedly been following SATC for a while and was quite impressed with their consistent body of work, especially since the company had only been around for a couple of years. While I was shooting Boardwalk Empire, our casting director Meredith Tucker had asked me if I could recommend any Norwegian men for a role she was casting. I reached out to Albert Bendix, SATC’s Co-Artistic Director and a fellow Dane, to see if he had any suggestions and we ended up meeting for coffee. We hit it off, kept in touch and this spring SATC reached out to me if I was interested in possibly becoming a member. Because this company doesn’t mess around, I even had to come in for an interview (a very nice one with coffee and Scandinavian cookies) with the entire company. Albert even skyped in from Denmark as he was on tour. Somehow I was able to prove myself worthy and now I’m responsible for Audience and Press Coordination.

     

    Have you seen an equal interest by both the Nordic and New York audience?

    Absolutely. SATC has a large audience following our productions, our SATContemporary Reading Series, and on our social media. For example, we have approximately 80-100 audience members per reading and that includes all ages of Scandinavians, Americans with Scandinavian roots, and Americans with an interest in new Nordic theater and contemporary culture.

     

    Rikke Lylloff and Albert Bendix from SATC’s Off-Broadway production “Bastards of Strindberg”, photographer Kait Ebinger

     

    Nordic eateries are popping up all over New York and the attendance to exhibitions by Nordic artists is high. Do you feel Nordic drama productions is on the same level of acceptance?

    There is definitely a surge in interest in all things Nordic. Especially, since Scandinavian tv shows like The Killing, The Bridge, or Borgen as well as Scandinavian literature have become widely popular (in their original or their US remakes) and Scandinavian actors like Mads Mikkelsen, Joel Kinnaman, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau or Birgitte Hjort Sørensen are being cast on American tv shows and films. We can feel that this definitely has an effect on the interest in what Scandinavian storytelling looks like on stage. Especially, when we’re inviting some of these actors to join us for readings. However, contemporary Scandinavian plays and playwrights are still relatively unknown stateside. So with SATC we’re in an exciting position to be able to bring these plays to New York for the first time. In a sense we’re educating the New York audiences about their existence while filling that increasing interest in Scandinavian culture. There are so many edgy, interesting, and widely different plays that are a cultural representation of what Scandinavia is today. I might be biased, but I definitely feel that we’re approaching the same level of acceptance very fast.

     

    Finally, you are performing a couple of  readings for SATC, can you tell us a bit about what we can expect.

    Our audience is definitely in for a fun (and free!) evening. We’ll have wine, guest actors and we’ll have up-and-coming playwright Marius Leknes Snekkevåg flying in from Norway. Our readings always take place at the beautiful Scandinavia House on Park Avenue. We’ll be presenting two short plays from Marius – one dramatic and one comedic. There’ll be a short Q&A with everyone and usually, we go out for drinks at a nearby bar, which is fun as we get a chance to chat with our audience. Personally, I’m extra excited as this will be my first time performing for SATC.

     

    Readings by

    Marius Leknes Snekkevåg (playwright, reading #1 on Oct 5, Norwegian plays)

    Courtesy of SATC

    Christiane Seidel (actress, reading #1 on Oct 5, Norwegian plays). www.christianeseidel.com

     

    Tomas Lagermand Lundme (playwright, reading #2 on Nov 9, Danish play “The Sauna”).

    Courtesy of SATC

    What’s On

    We’ll be kicking off our upcoming season with a new concept called “Shows in Development”. Here we invite audiences to follow and experience our process of creating an off-Broadway production at an early stage to give our audience the opportunity to ask questions and bring their thoughts to the table. The first show in development is titled “The Remember Me Project” and our first audience interaction will be on Sept 21, 2015 at 7:30pm with a pre-reception at 7:00pm. The play we’re working on is titled “Remember Me” (original title “Muista minut”) by Finnish writer Minna Nurmelin.

    We’re also continuing with our popular SATContemporary Reading Series. This is the sixth season of the series where we present five staged readings – one from each of the Nordic countries Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. The readings are one-night-only events, free to the public.

    The first reading will be on Oct 5, 2015 presenting two plays by the Norwegian playwright Marius Leknes Snekkevåg: “I Love You, Let Me Go” and “We Are The Voice of Our People”.

    The second reading will be on Nov 9, 2015 introducing Danish playwright Tomas Lagermand Lundme and his play “The Sauna”. For this reading, we’ll also have a guest star (TBA) joining us.

    The dates for the remaining readings are Jan 25, 2016, Feb 29, 2016, and May 2, 2016. We’re currently in the process of deciding on the individual plays.

    All our readings and “Show in Development” projects take place at Scandinavia House (http://www.scandinaviahouse.org/ at 58 Park Avenue, 10016 NYC) at 7:30pm with a 7:00pm pre-reception.

    In 2016, we’ll present the US-premiere of Norwegian playwright Arne Lygre’s play “Then Silence” as an Off-Broadway production.

    Head over to satcnyc.org to find out more
    Featured image Full cast from SATC’s Off-Broadway production “Bastards of Strindberg”, photographer Kait Ebinger
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    Season Scandinavia by Empty Deck

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 17th September 2015
  • Nordophile was interested to learn more about a project on Kickstarter which caught our attention, with the two words Season Scandinavia. We spoke to the director Kay Michael, who has excited us even more, as this project will no doubt feed many Nordophile’s Nordic passion. The reasoning behind the venture from what we could see was […]




    Nordophile was interested to learn more about a project on Kickstarter which caught our attention, with the two words Season Scandinavia.

    We spoke to the director Kay Michael, who has excited us even more, as this project will no doubt feed many Nordophile’s Nordic passion.

    The reasoning behind the venture from what we could see was that Nordic film and TV drama accompanied with Nordic literature was now a firm favourite in most homes, but what was the next step? Even though there is no sign of the interest in Nordic drama both on screen and book form faltering, anytime soon, what if Scandinavian playwrights and their works were brought to our stages?

    Empty Deck presents the most exciting unknown contemporary Scandinavian plays in co-production with The Other Room Theatre, Cardiff.

    Empty Deck is a new theatre collective that collaborates with playwrights and artists from all over the world, bringing the best of international new writing to the UK stage for the first time.

     

     

    We may have spent too many nighttime hours watching The Killing or The Bridge, or immersed in the brooding novels of Karl Ove Knausgaard and Stieg Larsson… and we got thinking: Where’s the theatrical equivalent to all this Nordic Noir?

    Beyond Jon Fosse’s work, little is known of contemporary Scandinavian playwrights. Over the last 12 months Empty Deck has been developing Ibsen Award winner Arne Lygre’s Then Silence for its English-language world premiere, and that development has led us to discover other exciting, award-winning Scandinavian playwrights, both up-and-coming and established, whose work deserves a wider and English audience.

    Thanks to International Performing Rights Ltd and Theatre Colombine Agency we have now selected plays from Denmark, Sweden, and Norway that we shall be presenting readings of across three venues in Cardiff between October – November.

    COSMIC FEAR OR THE DAY BRAD PITT GOT PARANOIA

    By Christian Lollike The Other Room, Cardiff 

    October 30th, 19.30PM

     

     

    “The world is a goddamn hairs breadth away from falling apart. Everyone knows it. Everyone fucking knows it, but no one…no one is doing anything.”

    Cosmic Fear or The Day Brad Pitt Got Paranoia charts our growing concerns and paralysis over the impact of climate change on the planet. LA is filled with traffic jams under heavy smog, trees are drifting under floods in Bangladesh and in China incinerators are burning holes in the ozone layer. Brad Pitt fears the future. Brad is a man of action and he’s not here to entertain but to make a difference. Brad embarks on the great universal love project: to Save Planet Earth

    Christian Lollike is an award-winning Danish director, adaptor and playwright educated at The Danish National School of Playwriting at Aarhus Theatre (1997 – 2001). He is one of the most performed Danish playwrights abroad and is known for his critical plays all written in an anti-naturalistic and open form. In 2009, he received a Reumert award as playwright of the year. 

    This play, by Danish Christian Lollike, grabbed our attention in particular and we’d like to do more than just a rehearsed reading of it. We’re asking for your support to enable one week’s Research & Development and performance sharing of this play during our residency at The Other Room, Cardiff’s pub theatre.

    Cosmic Fear is about three peoples’ paralysis in the face of climate change. Not knowing what to do they all imagine themselves to be Brad Pitt, using his status as Hollywood hero to make a blockbuster film campaigning for a new global consciousness of universal love, with the mission of saving Planet Earth.

    It’s silly. And it’s scary. But it is an ever-relevant play, which asks pertinent questions of our responsibility as individuals towards the care of the planet, humanity and the future. It reaches into our genuine concerns, fears, confusion, denial and anger about the devastating effects of climate change on the world.

     

                                                         Photography: Richard Davenport

     

    Collaboration is at the heart of what we do, and the team is only as good as the collaborators with whom we work.

    As part of our residency at The Other Room Theatre, all venue and marketing costs are covered. However we want to employ the most exciting Cardiff-based creatives to work with us for the week. To excavate the ongoing issues of climate change and look at how we can present this text through both theatrical and digital means, we want to engage:

    • 3 actors
    • One video designer 
    • One dramaturge 

    It’s important to us that artists are respected and paid properly for their hard work and creativity, in line with the Independent Theatre Council recommended rates of pay. Your support will enable us to do just that.

     

                                                         Photography: Ettiene Leung

     

    The Team

    Kay is a freelance theatre director, who trained at Drama Centre London and read English & Theatre Studies at Warwick University. She is a founding member of award-winning Curious Directive with whom she has devised, performed and directed. In 2014 she was Trainee Director at Paines Plough.

     

                                                         Photography: Hannah Lovell

     

    Fern has worked between Italy, Australia and Wales for the last 7 years. Most recently she worked at Wales Millennium Centre, Cardiff, on forming their strategic producing plan and new vision under their new artistic director.

     

     

    Born in Romania, Denisa’s training has included 5 years of Architecture and Design, 8 years of Drawing and Painting, 3 years of Sculpture and 6 years of Art History. At Central Saint Martins she developed her practice through both devised and design-led projects.

     

     

    Sara is a post-graduate of Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music & Dance and has collaborated with Kay since the early days of curious directive.

     

     

    Empty Deck

    Empty Deck is an international collective who tell stories that cross artistic forms and geographical borders.

    Collaborating with contemporary playwrights and artists from all over the world, we strive to make invigorating theatre that is physically bold, emotionally stirring, and relevant. We want to make work that is both local and global in its reach.
    Empty Deck aims to:
    • Deliver narratives that uncover experiences of the world that we live in now;
    • Challenge the relationship between the audience and spectacle, exploring the audience’s complicity within a shared space;
    • Interrogate the relationship between theatrical form and content in inventive, exciting and illuminating ways.Help us spread the word by posting our Kickstarter campaign on your facebook &/or twitter page and mention us on any social media platform you use.

    Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/emptydeck

    And follow us on Twitter:  https://twitter.com/emptydeckco

    Head to the Kickstarter page www.kickstarter.com

    Featured image by Richard Davenport

    Thank you to empty deck for text & use of photos

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    Nordic Film Days Lübeck

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 15th September 2015
  • Nordic Film Days Lübeck, first presented by the Lübeck Film Club in 1956 and taken over by the Hanseatic City of Lübeck in 1971, has one of the longest traditions of any film festival worldwide. It is the only festival in Germany, and the only one in Europe, which is entirely devoted to the presentation […]




    Nordic Film Days Lübeck, first presented by the Lübeck Film Club in 1956 and taken over by the Hanseatic City of Lübeck in 1971, has one of the longest traditions of any film festival worldwide. It is the only festival in Germany, and the only one in Europe, which is entirely devoted to the presentation of films from the North and Northeast of Europe.

    Feature films, documentaries and short films from Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Iceland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway and Sweden are presented at this five-day event every year at the beginning of November. In addition, there is an extensive children’s and youth film programme and a retrospective devoted to important eras, specific genres or famous persons of film history. The section Filmforum presents films from North Germany. Accompanying the film programme are seminars, discussions, roundtable talks, concerts and readings.

     

     

    The Nordic Film Days Lübeck is both an audience festival and an important meeting place for the film industry in Germany and northern Europe. Many directors whose debut works were presented in Lübeck have gone on to earn fame around the world – such as Bille August, Lasse Hallström, Aki Kaurismäki or Fridrik Thór Fridriksson.

    The film festival is put on by the Hanseatic City of Lübeck in cooperation with the Scandinavian film institutes and foundations as well as the corresponding film institutions in the Baltic countries. Patrons of the festival are the ambassadors of the Nordic countries in Germany. Honorary President is the Norwegian actress and film director Liv Ullmann. Media partners are the television and radio broadcaster Norddeutscher Rundfunk (NDR) and daily newspaper Lübecker Nachrichten.

    The 2015 official programme will be released early October, but here are some of the previous years winners for you to find some Nordic Films to keep you going until then!

     

    Previous Winners

    The NDR Film Prize for Best Feature Film.

    Endowed with 12,500 euros this prize has been awarded annually since 1990 for a “feature film of special artistic quality.” The film should “reflect society in an independent creative language and open up new perspectives in terms of content and aesthetics.”

    Straße der Hoffnung / Vonarstræti / Life in A Fishbowl
    Baldvin Z (Zophoníasson), Iceland 2014

     

     

     

    Lübecker Nachrichten.

    The oldest festival prize, was founded in 1979 by the newspaper Lübecker Nachrichten. Since 1993, it includes prize money amounting to the current value of 5,000 euros. The prize is awarded to the winning feature film in competition on the basis of an audience ballot.

    2014
    HalloHallo / HallåHallå / HelloHello
    Maria Blom, Sweden 2013

     

     

     

    Baltic Film Prize for a Nordic Feature Film.

    In 1991, filmmakers from the Baltic States created a film prize for an outstanding feature film from the Nordic countries.

    2014
    Schwedenbastard / Svenskjævel / Underdog
    Ronnie Sandahl, Sweden 2014

     

    Photo: © Ita ZbroneicZajt

     

    Documentary Film Prize.

    The Confederation of German Trade Unions (Deutscher Gewerkschaftsbund) awards a film prize for a “socially and politically committed film” from the festival’s documentary film programme. The award carries a cash prize of 2,500 euros. In previous years, the prize was awarded by the Lübeck Trade unions.

    2014
    Früher träumte ich vom Leben / Näin Unta Elämästä / Once I dreamed of Life
    Jukka Kärkkäinen and Sini Liimatainen, Finland 2014

     

     

    Children’s & Youth Film Prize.

    This prize, created in 1983 by the Nordic Film Institutes, has been awarded to the best Scandinavian children’s or youth film since 1993. A genre which has been an important component of the Nordic Film Days since 1979. From 2008 on this prize is endowed with 5,000 euros, donated by the charitable foundation Gemeinnützige Sparkassenstiftung zu Lübeck.

    2014
    Der Lehrjunge / Oppipoika / The Disciple
    Ulrika Bengts, Finland 2013

     


    57. NORDIC FILM DAYS LÜBECK – Festival opens with “Rams” – Retrospective goes on northerly journeys – INTERFILM honourable membership for Linde Fröhlich.

     

     

    Linde Fröhlich announced the first high point of this year’s festival with the opening night film, “Rams” (Hrútar) by director Grímur Hákonarson, an Icelandic-Danish production that won the Un Certain Regard Prize at this year’s Cannes film festival. The NFL is pleased to welcome the Icelandic director and his two leads, Sigurður Sigurjónsson and Theodór Júlíusson as guests at the NFL opening night celebration on November 4, 2015 in Lübeck (the film will be released in Germany in autumn 2015 by Arsenal Filmverleih).

    “The Icelanders are powerful storytellers and Grímur Hákonarson’s “Rams” is the best example of this.  The film is a human drama, filled with empathy for the protagonists, as well as odd situations and comic moments, all set in a spectacular landscape,” said Linde Fröhlich.

    Curator and director of the Retrospective, Jörg Schöning, presented this year’s look back, dedicated to “Northern journeys. Travelogues & Road Movies”. Audiences will be “transported” back in time with a screening of the silent Swedish outdoor drama “The Strongest” (1929), shown with musical accompaniment in cooperation with the Lübeck Academy of Music under the direction of professor Franz Danksagmüller, as well as by maritime documentation by shipboard photographer Richard Fleischhut (1881 – 1951) and film treasures from the National Library of Norway. On top of that, selected road movies will take audiences on sometimes comic, sometimes melancholy, but always adventurous paths to far-flung locales in the Scandinavian film landscape. The series will include films by Ingmar Bergman, Friðrik Þór Friðriksson, Mika and Aki Kaurismäki, as well as directors Karin Ottarssdóttir and Auli Mantila. The Retrospective will open with the world premiere of “Hit the Road Gunnar” by young director Nicolas Ehret.

    For more information about this years event and other features head over to www.luebeck.de

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    Ultima – Oslo Contemporary Music Festival

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 7th September 2015
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    Ultima – Oslo Contemporary Music Festival takes place September 10-19. This is a fascinating festival which we thoroughly recommend as it takes us through a celebration of music through collaborations, talks, commissions, exhibitions, improvised performances and of course music from every corner of genres. Held in Oslo this is the perfect opportunity for a Nordophile to […]




    Ultima – Oslo Contemporary Music Festival takes place September 10-19. This is a fascinating festival which we thoroughly recommend as it takes us through a celebration of music through collaborations, talks, commissions, exhibitions, improvised performances and of course music from every corner of genres.

    Held in Oslo this is the perfect opportunity for a Nordophile to explore this cultural mecca of a Nordic city and immerse in the music culture through the festival.

     

     

    Rikksscenen

     

    About

    Ultima is the premiere contemporary music festival in the Nordic region. The festival became a designated “knutepunkt” (cultural hub) in 2006 and is supported by the Ministry of Culture and Church Affairs and Oslo City Council. Ultima is a foundation with 17 members, all of them professional cultural institutions or organisations.

    The festival takes place during September and is staged at venues all around Oslo. Our events are staged both in large, established venues such as the Norwegian National Opera & Ballet, Oslo Concert Hall and the University of Oslo’s Great Hall as well as in small clubs, shop premises, industrial premises, museums, schools and outdoors.

    The Ultima Festival aims to promote artistic distinctiveness, trends and innovation and to make music of a high artistic standard accessible by everyone.

    His Royal Highness Crown Prince Haakon is the patron of Ultima.

     

    Featured Events

     

     

    Below are just a few of some of the events which are taking place. Head over to the Ultima website to find out about the other events which are taking place at the festival.

     

    Elisabeth Vatn: The color Beneath.

    Ekeberg park 6.30pm, September 10th

     

     

    Exclusive sunrise and sunset concerts with Elisabeth Vatn in James Turrell’s light installations in Ekeberg sculpture park.

    The Color Beneath by musician and composer ELISABETH VATN was conceived in James Turrell’s light installations in the old water reservoir on Ekeberg. Between 10–13 September, Vatn (harmonium, Meråker clarinet, bagpipes) performs withANDERS RØINE (langeleik, mouth harp, violin).

    Contemporary artist JAMES TURRELL works with perception, colour, light and space. The two location-specific works Ganzfeld: Double Vision and Skyspace: The Color Beneath were both created for the old water reservoir in 2013. While Ganzfeldexplores the way colours affect our senses, Skyspace makes use of the chromatic interaction between the concert space and the sky at dawn and dusk.

    In The Color Beneath the composer and performer turn their encounter with the installation into music, partly following the composition and partly through improvisation. Consequently, none of the concerts performed in this unique setting will be identical.

    The Color Beneath album was recorded during autumn 2014 and is released during Ultima 2015. The concerts are staged in cooperation with nyMusikk, Ekebergparken and Grappa Musikkforlag with contributions by Fond for Utøvende Kunstnere.

     

    Teknisk Museum, 10 AM

    Installation throughout festival

     

     

    ‘We are so used to seeing that suddenly we forgot how to look, so used to hearing that suddenly we forgot to listen.’

    Every movement we see in nature can be perceived as a visual concert, like a storm of birds moving together making astonishing patterns, or snow falling from the sky and touching the ground.Quintetto is based on the study of casual movement of objects or living creatures used as input for the production of sounds. The basic concept is to reveal what the ‘invisible concerts’ of everyday life. In this installation, the scene is five aquariums with a goldfish in each. The movement of the five fishes is captured by a video camera that translates their movements in digital sound signals/music in real time.

     

    Den Norske Opera & Ballett, Provesalen.

    MATTHEW SHLOMOWITZ: LECTURE ABOUT BAD MUSIC (WP)  ALEXANDER SCHUBERT: SENSATE FOCUS  September 11th 5pm

     

     

    Can music really be bad in itself or is ‘bad’ really nothing other than a subjective opinion?

    That is the question MATTHEW SHLOMOWITZ asks in Lecture About Bad Music, which was specially composed for the Anglo-Belgian octet. The work, which was written for lecturer, clarinet, electric guitar, synthesiser and violin, has been commissioned by Ultima and will receive its debut performance here. Australian-born Shlomowitz draws on elements from many fields and genres, employing musical demonstrations and recreations of psychological experiments to examine differences between musical experience and musical material.

    ALEXANDER SCHUBERT‘s Sensate Focus combines light and image, allowing lighting effects take on the role of a fifth performer to a quartet of musicians. In the work, Schubert, who studied bioinformatics, experiments with the interfaces between gesticular movements and musical sounds, where the performers’ physical movements and position in the room are essential elements of the composition.

    PLUS MINUS ENSEMBLE specialises in new music and modern key works. It is particularly known for its interest in avant-garde, experimental and conceptual music, such as Stockhausen’s seminal work from 1963, from which the ensemble takes its name.

     

    OCA (Office for Contemporary Art)

    September 13th 6.pm PRE-TALK AT OCA 5PM. INTRODUCTION BY KATYA GARCÍA-ANTÓN, DIRECTOR OF OCA.

     

     

    CAMILLE NORMENT, who is Norway’s entry to the 56th Venice Biennale, began her collaboration with composer and writer DAVID TOOP at Café OTO in London in 2014. The collaboration resulted in a performance at the Biennale. The performance explores the legends, stories and mysteries of the depth of the oceans through sound. It is still being continually developed, and will be performed at Ultima in September.

    The Oslo-based American artist CAMILLE NORMENT’S practice includes performance, installation, drawing and sound. She explores how the body is interconnected with its environment through sound, and contemplates on the power of dissonance to create spaces for new ways of thinking. DAVID TOOP is a British composer, writer and professor of Audio Culture and Improvisation at the London College of Communication. The third edition of his debut book, Rap Attack, has just been released. He has recorded five solo albums since he released Ocean of Sound in 1995.

    In cooperation with nyMusikk and the Office for Contemporary Art Norway.

     

    Black Box Teater; Annie Dorsen – Yesterday Tomorrow

    September 18th, 7pm & September 19th, 6pm

     

     

    AN EVOLUTIONARY MUSICAL

    Annie Dorsen’s Yesterday Tomorrow is a musical that breaks most of the rules for this genre. Unlike traditional musicals, the music for this musical is created during the course of the performance with the help of computer-generated algorithms, which means that the final result is different every time. The only points of reference are the two well-known songs Yesterday by The Beatles andTomorrow from the musical Annie.

    Based on evolutionary processes such as mutation and natural selection, the algorithms determine the most appropriate route from the first song to the next, or from what has passed to what is to come. As a result, the performance stands as an expression of the unpredictable nature of the present, as a contrast to a familiar past and the notion of a happy future. The music is performed by three singers who continually receive information about which rhythm, pitch and lyrics to sing. The result is an intelligent, humorous yet disturbing encounter between man and machine.

    Annie Dorsen has previously work in film, dance and theatre, and in recent years has been particularly interested in artificial intelligence and digital performance. The Yesterday Tomorrowproject was developed in cooperation with Pierre Godard and Greg Bellar from the Institute for Research and Coordination in Acoustics/Music (IRCAM.).

    Concept, direction: Annie Dorsen. Music director: Joanna Bailie. Algorithm design: Pierre Godard. Sound design: Greg Beller. Video systems design: Ryan Holsopple. Lighting design and technical direction: Bruno Pocheron, Ruth Waldeyer. Producer: Alexandra Rosenberg. Performers: Hai-Ting Chinn, Jeffrey Gavett & Natalie Raybould. Coproduction: Holland Festival, Black Box Teater, Performance Space 122, La Villette – Résidences d’Artistes 2015, L’Hippodrome, scène nationale de Douai, Théâtre de Gennevilliers with Festival d’automne à Paris, Le Maillon-Wacken – Scene européenne – Strasbourg, théâtre Garonne – Scène européenne – Toulouse. Supported by: Mount Tremper Arts, Abrons Arts Center, New York State Council on the Arts.

     

    CEO & Artistic Director – Lars Pettern Hagen

     

     

    “The board appreciates that Lars Petter Hagen will continue to manage the festival for another three years,” says Stein Gullberg, Chairman of the Board. “Mr. Hagen has brought an innovative spirit to the festival program and steered its administrative advancement with a steady hand. Public attendance is on a rise, and Ultima is meeting with ever growing international attention. It’s important to make the best use of this potential, which is best served by the continuity we achieve by extending this appointment. Lars Petter Hagen’s extensive network as well as the fact that he is held in esteem by a broad music and art environment, both within Norway and internationally.”

    Lars Petter Hagen has accepted the offer. “Oslo is a fabulous music town in constant growth, making the Ultima Festival one of the most exciting places to work in the whole world right now. I look forward to another three years with unpredictable musical encounters, dialog with the public and artists, good colleagues and partners,” he says.

     

    Ultima Academy

     

     

    How does art affect nature? How does nature affect art? For its 2015 edition, Ultima Academy invites scientists, music researchers and artists to talk about nature and discuss our attitude to it.

    Head over to Ultima.no to read more about the collaborations and what you can expect to see!

    Special thanks to Ultima for text and photos.

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    Helsinki Design Week

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 1st September 2015
  • About Founded in 2005, Helsinki Design Week is the largest design festival in the Nordic countries. Held annually in September, the multidisciplinary festival presents design from a number of fields as well as fashion, architecture and urban culture. Helsinki Design Week will be held 3.–13.9.2015. Helsinki Design Week presents the new faces and phenomena of design, […]




    About

    Founded in 2005, Helsinki Design Week is the largest design festival in the Nordic countries. Held annually in September, the multidisciplinary festival presents design from a number of fields as well as fashion, architecture and urban culture. Helsinki Design Week will be held 3.–13.9.2015.

    Helsinki Design Week presents the new faces and phenomena of design, promotes design internationally in collaboration with various partners and offers city citizens through design a forum to participate in developing and discussing the city and its culture. The festival programme contains around 150 events every year, and includes both events targeted for professionals and the general public.

    The Helsinki Design Week main events are produced by Helsinki Design Week and its main partners. The Helsinki Design Week programme is produced in cooperation with national and international stakeholders and an extensive event-planning network. The programme is completed with selected events from an open call for programme entries. In 2014 the festival boasted about 110,000 visitors.

    The festival programme takes place in a variety of event spaces spread throughout the city: from museums to markets, from seminar halls to secret shops. The festival also actively seeks new spaces and ways to explore the city.

    Helsinki Design Week is produced by the design service agency Luovi Productions Oy.

     

    Featured events

    Below you will find some of the Design inspired events taking place throughout Helsinki Design Week. But there is so much more going on including a Lego Collective Workshop, The Children’s Weekend and A Focus on the Future of Cities. Check out on their site!

     

    A Workshop by Proloque Shop 10.9.15

    © JONNA JÄRVINEN

    ..”a workshop may be a room or building which provides both the area and tools (or machinery) that may be required for the manufacture or repair of manufactured goods.” (wiki)

    Proloque believes in the future of a fascinating live shop experience and unforgattable objects. Proloque Shop invited set designer and artist Jonna Järvinen to A WORKSHOP by Proloque Shop. In this Helsinki Design Week -evening Järvinen will finalize her magnificent dome-installations for Proloque, also upon customers wishes. Jonna Järvinen’s dome-installations are fascinating micro worlds that pay attention to the small details in life and nature surrounding us.

    You are welcome to follow and interact with her work or just enjoy our HDW evening,  where both beautiful objects and a shop comes alive. Small refreshments will be served.

     

    Cityspace 3-13.9.15

     

     

     

    A multi-dimensional meeting point of art and design, built out of containers by the seaside, right next to the newly renovated Old market hall of Helsinki. The transformable containers will work as a stage for surprising spaces and events where people and companies from different fields meet and create new and lively urban city culture. The event is produced by Hei Helsinki and Misc. Management.

     

    Anthology of Finnish Fashion 3-13.9.15

     

     

    This exhibition approaches its topic through nine themes: Folk, Globalization, The Engineering Mindset, The Millennium, Modernism, Change, the Economic Boom, Winter and Equality.

    In this exhibition, fashion is understood in a broad sense. The exhibits include technological clothing design, such as a motorcycle outfit and smart sportswear.

    The heritage of modernism is prominent in Finnish fashion design. Typical features of Finnish fashions in the spirit of modernism are practicality, functionalism and usability. The Modernism theme features work by Samuji and Irja Leimu, among others. On the other hand, the idiom of form is also influenced by colourful folk-inspired maximalism and decorativeness. The designers presented in the Folk theme include Sophie Sälekari and Annikki Karvinen.

    The conditions under which Finnish fashion and clothing designers have worked have changed radically from the 1950s to the present day. During the heyday of the Finnish fashion and clothing industry from the late 1960s to the beginning of the 1990s, there were over 500 manufacturers in this sector, employing a large number of designers. When trade with the Soviet Union collapsed and the clothing industry moved out of Finland, designers had to find new ways of earning their livelihood. Around the turn of the millennium,  brands established by young designers began to emerge in Finland. At present, Finnish fashion is a seamless part of international fashion.

    Designers and brands featured in the exhibition include Achilles Ion Gabriel,Ivana Helsinki, Jasmiine Julin-Aro, Karhu, Satu Maaranen, Makia,Marimekko, Mattisen Teollisuus, Daniel Palillo, Plastic Pony, Jukka Rintala,Anna Ruohonen and Vuokko.

    The curators of the exhibition are Suvi Saloniemi, Chief Curator of Exhibitions at Design Museum and journalist Liisa Jokinen. The exhibition architecture is by Linda Bergroth.

     

    I Heart Vallila 5.9.15

     

     

    The I Heart Vallila -urban event takes place on 5 September in Vallila. The event opens up the workshops, companies and brick-and-mortar shops of Vallila and makes visible the creative professionals working in the neighbourhood. Doors will be open and everyone is invited to meet the makers and creative workers of Vallila.

     

    The Charm of Musical Instruments 5.9.15

     

     

    Families are invited to the world of musical instruments in order to discover how the shape of the instrument affects its sound. Heureka Science Centre organises a workshop where children (5 years or older) can make curious and surprising “scientific” musical instruments. Jamkids Music School offers a music workshop where everyone can play. Jug band Dog in a Bucket presents and plays their home-made instruments.

    Children can try various instruments under the guidance of music teachers from the North Helsinki Music School. Mubik, a mobile game and virtual musical instrument, is presented as an example of the future.

    The event takes place in the Music! exhibition of the Helsinki City Museum.

    To meet the rest of the team and find out more about the events, head over to www.HelsinkiDesignWeek.com

     

     

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    The Nordic Council Film Prize 2015

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 31st August 2015
  • The Nordic Council Film Prize nominations for 2015 are out. The purpose of The Nordic Council Film Prize is to support the production of Nordic films in order to strengthen the Nordic film industry, thereby in the long term contributing to the strengthening of Nordic films internationally.     The winner will be a feature […]




    The Nordic Council Film Prize nominations for 2015 are out.

    The purpose of The Nordic Council Film Prize is to support the production of Nordic films in order to strengthen the Nordic film industry, thereby in the long term contributing to the strengthening of Nordic films internationally.

     

     

    The winner will be a feature film that is rooted in Nordic culture, is of high artistic quality and stands out through its artistic originality to form a harmonious work. Innovation within the film genre will also be given positive consideration when comparing the nominated films. The films nominated must primarily be recorded in a Nordic language to be considered for the Film Prize.

    The prize was awarded for the first time on a trial basis in 2002 in connection with the Nordic Council’s 50th anniversary. It became permanent in 2005 and has since been awarded along with the Nordic Council’s other prizes for music, literature, and nature and the environment.

     

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    The Nordic Council Film Prize 2009 was awarded to the Danish film director and scriptwriter Lars von Trier and producer Meta Louise Foldager for the film ANTICHRIST.

     

    A member of the jury from every Nordic country

    Each Nordic country appoints one jury member and a substitute. These people are film connoisseurs but must be independent of the film industry in their home country and have no personal financial interest in the nominated films.

     

    Nordic Jury appoints the prize winner

    The national jury members form a Nordic Adjudication Committee. The national jury member proposes the nominations from his/her own country. The film nominations are made public at the beginning of September. After that it is the combined Nordic adjudication committee which decides which of the nominated films – one from each Nordic country – will win the prize.

    Films from the Faroe Islands, Greenland and Åland are outside the countries quota of one film each. Nominated films from these countries must be submitted to the Nordic Adjudication Committee. When a Faroese, Greenlandic or Ålandic film has to be judged a jury member from that country is co-opted onto the committee.

     

     

    Film prize divided between three main functions

    The Nordic Council Film Prize is administered by the Nordic Film and TV Fund and is worth DKK 350,000 (approx. €47,000), and thus has the same value as the literature, nature and the environment, and music prizes. The prize money is to be shared between the scriptwriter, the director and the producer, which underlines that film as an art form is the result of close co-operation between these three main functions.

    The Film Prize is usually awarded with the other Nordic prizes for literature, music and nature and the environment during the Nordic Council’s Ordinary Session in the autumn at a special ceremony.

    Previous winners of the Film Prize include Danish Per Fly’s film ‘Drabet’ (‘Manslaughter’) and the film ‘Zozo’ by Josef Fares from Sweden.

     

    The Nordic Council Film Prize Nominations 2015

     

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    Stille hjerte (Silent Heart) – Denmark

     

    Masterfully crafted and played to perfection, director Bille August and screenwriter Christian Torpe tell a warm-hearted story about an unforgettable weekend where a family has to deal with a mother’s wish to die. In the typically Nordic tradition of exorcising all skeletons from the closet, the film dissects one of the most difficult challenges a family can face – saying goodbye to a loved one.

     

    He ovat paenneet (They Have Escaped) – Finland

     

    A gripping coming-of-age drama, a thrilling road movie, a drug-induced fantasy and then some! Jukka-Pekka Valkeapää’s They Have Escaped flirts with genre characteristics only to rise above their respective dynamics and to metamorphose into an expressionistic, no holds barred adult fairytale. The exquisite cinematography combined with a thoughtful, multifaceted soundtrack adds to film’s strong, dreamlike ambiance.

     

    Fúsi (Virgin Mountain) – Iceland

     

    With a delicate touch, director Dagur Kári´s Virgin Mountain is a moving coming-of-age portrait of a gentle giant. In a skilfully nuanced way this humanistic film conveys both inner torment and offbeat charm, while its symbolic interaction of items big and small conveys such universal themes as goodness, giving and grace.

     

    Mot naturen (Out of Nature) – Norway

     

    In Out of Nature, Ole Giæver portrays a self-reflection of our modern lives and today’s Nordic man. A personal yet forthright narrative conveys a collage of mental imagery to express memories, hopes, dreams, and emotive atmospheres, yet all in a good humour that addresses embarrassment, shame and pain.

     

    Gentlemen- Sweden

     

    Gentlemen takes us on a winding journey of a story in which time perspectives and identities are as fluid as the boundary between dreams and fantasy. The attention to detail in the film’s various expressions culminates in a uniquely personal, playful and self-reflective work.

    Photos & text credited to Norden.org

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    NJORD Biennale – Copenhagen Festival

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • Nordophile is pleased to present another Nordic culture event which brings together different genres into a celebrated collaboration. NJORD is Copenhagen´s innovative new biennale for new Nordic music, art and culture. It offers new music, electronics, visuals, dance, installations and workshops – all presented at untraditional venues all over Copenhagen. NJORD Biennale will have its […]




    Nordophile is pleased to present another Nordic culture event which brings together different genres into a celebrated collaboration.

    northern_lights_nature_photo-e1434964546168

    NJORD is Copenhagen´s innovative new biennale for new Nordic music, art and culture.

    It offers new music, electronics, visuals, dance, installations and workshops – all presented at untraditional venues all over Copenhagen.

    NJORD Biennale will have its inaugural run from 28th of January – 1st of February 2016, where the meeting of music and visual art will be put under the microscope by a string of distinguished composers, musicians and artists.

    The relationship between the tonal colours of music and the colour tones of visual art are examined through concerts, exhibits, a separate children´s programme, seminars and lectures when NJORD 2016 takes centre stage in Copenhagen under the headline SOUND – COLOUR – MOTION.

     

    Kaukainen rakkaus

    Photo; Sakari Viika

     

    Composer in Residence

    The Finish composer Kaija Saariaho is this year’s Composer in Residence at NJORD New Nordic Music Biennale 2016 and her work will be presented to the audience in a series of concerts and exhibitions.

    Kaija Saariaho (born 1952) is one the most significant composers of our time. Her music is characterised by transparent, organic and expressive soundscapes – often created combining electronic compositions with acoustic music.

    At NJORD a number of Kaija Saariaho’s works will be performed and contextualised, using both the works of other composers as well as visual art and dance. Furthermore, NJORD has commissioned a completely new work by Saariaho, which will be presented for the first time during NJORD 2016. Saariaho herself will also play an active role in the development of the sound and art workshops for children that will be held during and after the Biennale.
    Thus, NJORD 2016 is the most comprehensive presentation of Kaija Saariaho’s work ever seen in Denmark, and as such NJORD Biennale affords Danish audiences a unique opportunity to experience this world-class composer in a variety of constellations and surroundings.

    NJORD 2016 is built upon the artistic idea of a convergence between music, colour and movement. A theme that proposes a cultural event of the senses, where the tonal colours of music and colour tones of visual art will saturate the historical as well as modern architecture of Copenhagen.
    For this purpose, Kaija Saariaho’s music is an obvious and most relevant choice. Saariaho is known for combining acoustic and electronic music focusing on sound and timbre, and her works reaches across genres into the visual arts, dance and theatre.

     

    2011_Kaija-Saariaho-ved-sit-arbejdsbord-3_Foto-Priska-Ketterer_Farve_631-Kb-636x1024

    Photo; Priska Ketterer

    Before Saariaho became a composer she was a student of music and art. Hence, the intersection between these art forms has always been an important fixture in her oeuvre. Often she draws inspiration from outside the realm of music – be it in the night sky, nature, art or literature.

    ”While I sat there listening, I suddenly began to see colours and colour formations moving through the orchestra while they were playing – just as seeing the northern lights moving across the sky. Colours changing as great formations moves in gentle strokes across the horizon – this was how these colour formations moved through the orchestra as they were playing Saariaho’s music.”
    Organiser of NJORD Biennale, Jane Schwarz, about her first experience with Kaija Saariaho’s music.

    Kaija Saariaho studied composition by Paavo Heininen at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki, with Brian Ferneyhough at Freiburg Musikhochschule and at IRCAM in Paris, where she has been living since 1982.

     

    KaijaSaariaho_2014_2_Maarit-Kytöharju

    Photo;Maarit Kytöharju

    Kaija Saariaho has received a number of awards and prizes for her music including the Nordic Counsel Music Prize in 2000, the American Grawemeyer Composition Award, one of the most prestigious awards in the world, in 2003, Musical America Composer of the year 2008, the Léonie Sonning Music Prize in 2011, awarded to her at a concert with Danish National Symphony Orchestra, and in 2013 the Polar Music Prize alongside Senegalese singer and politician Youssou N’Dour.

    For more information which is being released over the next few weeks, head to NjordBiennale.com

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    Nordic Delight – Norwegian Night

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 26th August 2015
  • EKKO_pand_voorkant_SophiaTwigt (2)

    Nordophile has always noted the Nordic connection between the Nordics and the Netherlands. Close ties are going to be made even stronger when Nordic Delight put on a Norwegian Night in the cultural hub city, Utrecht.     Nordic Delight Norwegian Night with Emilie Nicolas, Bloody Beach & Fay Wildhagen The organisation of Nordic Delight […]




    Nordophile has always noted the Nordic connection between the Nordics and the Netherlands. Close ties are going to be made even stronger when Nordic Delight put on a Norwegian Night in the cultural hub city, Utrecht.

     

    1

     

    Nordic Delight Norwegian Night with Emilie Nicolas, Bloody Beach & Fay Wildhagen

    The organisation of Nordic Delight has announced the next Scandinavian event today. On Saturday, September, 26th music venue EKKO in Utrecht is all about Norway. With live performances by Emilie Nicolas, Bloody Beach and Fay Wildhagen Nordic Delight brings three talented high potential acts from Norway to Utrecht. Besides live music, short films by Norwegian makers are screened and there is a limited number of combi tickets available including a three-course Norwegian dinner.

     

    ed11ef70ff-FAY-LAV

     

    Fay Wildhagen is a young folk singer-songwriter and guitarist from Oslo and one of the biggest promises of Norway. With a full band including violin and cello she brings an organic blend of folk, rock and other genres with lots of passion and charm and a very unique sound. After a summer full of performances at all important Norwegian festivals, she will play at several international (showcase) festivals later this year, but first she will make her debut in the Netherlands at our Norwegian Night.

    FayWildhagen.com

     

    Bloody-Beach-Photo-by-Tore-Winsents

    Photo credit Tore Winsents

     

    Who remembers Kakkmaddafakka? Bloody Beach are also from Bergen and guarantee a similar party! A cheerful mix of pop, rock, psychedelia, with elements of afrobeat, dub and surf rock, which they describe as ‘tropidelica’. Next year, with the release of their second album, a breakthrough is expected, including shows at Dutch festivals, but at Nordic Delight you can get a first taste.

    BloodyBeachMusic.com

     

     

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    Emilie Nicolas is the most well-known name in her own country and was already on the wishlist of Nordic Delight for a while. The Norwegian singer and composer is praised for her powerful vocals and wistful lyrics, accompanied by a sparse and somber backdrop of electronic beats. Emilie Nicolas won several awards as best live act and for her debut album, which was released in the Netherlands in June this year. In September, she will tour through Europe and gives an exclusive show at Nordic Delight.

    Nordic Delight organised two festivals and several events in Utrecht in the last three years, always focussed on Scandinavian music and culture. On September 26 Nordic Delight offers you the chance again to experience the most talented upcoming music acts from Norway for the first time in the Netherlands.

    EmilieNicolas.com

     

    Head over to Nordic Delight for more information and support this Nordic event at EKKO Utrecht.

     

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    Tickets are now for sale here: http://bit.ly/1EglOP5

    More info: www.nordicdelight.nl

    Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1633009736915265

     

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