GEST – Gothenburg English Studio Theatre

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 15th February 2016
  • Nordophile enjoys promoting the arts which come from all Nordic regions and bringing them to our English-speaking audience with a similar passion. So imagine our delight when we stumbled across a theatre group in Sweden which performs in English. This is certainly a must when heading over to Gothenburg for a cultural holiday! GEST – Gothenburg […]




    Nordophile enjoys promoting the arts which come from all Nordic regions and bringing them to our English-speaking audience with a similar passion. So imagine our delight when we stumbled across a theatre group in Sweden which performs in English. This is certainly a must when heading over to Gothenburg for a cultural holiday!

    GEST – Gothenburg English Studio Theatre is an award-winning English-speaking theatre located in Gothenburg, Sweden and is the only professional English-speaking theatre in western Sweden. We bring the very best of British contemporary drama in its original language to Sweden.

    GEST is run by Executive Artistic Director Kristina Brändén Whitaker and Co-Artistic Director Gary Whitaker. Actors are recruited in Britain before every production whilst a superb Swedish production team takes care of set and light design, music and administration.

     

    (Photo Lina Ikse taken from 2015 play YEN)

     

    It was founded in 2005 with the aim of providing quality, contemporary and award-winning theatre in the English language.

    GEST works with professional actors and directors from Britain and Sweden and aims to produce theatre of the highest standard, which is accessible to everyone. As well as performing in Sweden, GEST also performs internationally and are always keen to collaborate with theatres abroad. We also collaborate closely with schools, colleges and universities, offering specially reduced student prices, workshops and after-show discussions with the actors. (See Teachers’ page)

    Gothenburg has a large English-speaking population and is the home to a variety of nationalities where English is the second language. GEST also seeks to cater for these people, who may long for an enjoyable night at the theatre.

    At present nearly all the great English-speaking plays that are performed in Gothenburg are translated into Swedish. GEST are proud to be able to show the plays in the language that they were originally written.

     

    What’s on

     

    The Events

    Gothenburg English Studio Theatre presents the Swedish premiere of the award-winning and critically acclaimed play  The Events by David Greig. Music by John Browne. Directed by Gary Whitaker.

    8 April- 30 April at Gothenburg English Studio Theatre

    4 May – 14 May at Kulturhuset, Stadsteatern Stockholm

    (Photo: Lina Ikse)

     

    Featuring local choirs, The Events tells a story of obsession, grief and forgiveness

    Claire, a liberal church minister, runs a community choir in a small seaside town.
    “…a choir that brought together vulnerable people, old people, asylum seekers, immigrant men, young mums and so on – it was a – the idea was – you can imagine. ”

     Claire, a liberal church minister, runs a community choir in a small seaside town.
    ”…a choir that brought together vulnerable people, old people, asylum seekers, immigrant men, young mums and so on – it was a – the idea was – you can imagine.”

    One day a boy with a gun walks in during a choir rehearsal resulting in devastating consequences. Claire becomes obsessed with the boy and the reasons for his actions. She looks for answers among the politicians that the boy associates himself with, his father, old classmates and, in the end, the boy himself. It’s a journey that takes her to the edge of reason, science, politics and faith.

    The Events has a strong relevance to today’s development of far right extremism in Sweden and Europe whilst also exploring how far forgiveness can stretch in the face of brutality. Different local community choirs will join the cast on stage for each performance in this rare, daring and beautiful new play.

    To find out more about GEST and upcoming theatre productions head to GEST.se

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    Finnish artist & photographer – Milla Koivisto

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 5th February 2016
  • Kaikubanner

    Nordophile was very excited to come across Finnish artist & photographer, Milla Koivisto. Not purely just because of her breath-taking artistic view of the Nordic landscape but also because of her natural intensity when relating back to her audience her vision. Milla Koivisto is an artist, photographer and author from Finland. Her focus is on the […]




    Nordophile was very excited to come across Finnish artist & photographer, Milla Koivisto. Not purely just because of her breath-taking artistic view of the Nordic landscape but also because of her natural intensity when relating back to her audience her vision.

    Milla Koivisto is an artist, photographer and author from Finland. Her focus is on the natural world and our connections and relationship with it. Milla studied both illustration and visual communication at the Arts University of Bournemouth. She also studied classical flute and music theatre in Finland. She works with several artistic disciplines and her interest lies in narrative structures and storytelling. She currently divides her time between Finland and the UK.

     

    Kaiku

    We were keen to understand more about the Kaiku project from this Finnish artist and find out how this would translate to peak the interest of Nordophiles, with a certain attraction to the Nordic arts, in all genres.

    Kaiku is an audio-visual project, structured around a core narrative. Set in and inspired by the Nordic landscape of the Finnish archipelago, Kaiku tells the story of a reclusive Shaman, a flute playing girl called Aino and her echo Kaiku. The protagonists of the story face the harshness and the isolation brought by the landscape and each of their lives is a manifestation of learning and surviving by the stipulations of nature. Music and sound in the natural world become ways of connecting, coping and conveying feelings in the dialogue-less story of Kaiku.

    In the Kaiku project traditional storytelling is combined with modern narrative technique. The project combines words, images, recorded sound, compositions and video. The Kaiku project will be released in a series of exhibitions, events and talks during 2015-2017.

     

    The Kaiku Series

    The first short film in the Kaiku series, ‘The Old Woman’ is an exploration of solitude through sound and image and portrays the landscape of an old woman called Aino’s soul. The film was shot during a three month stay on a treeless lighthouse island of Bengtskär in the Baltic Sea in Finland.

     

     

    The Kaiku book

    The first part of the Kaiku project is an illustrated, fictional book. Set on a small island where the winter days are short and the summer sun never sets and life must adapt to the changing seasons. A vision of two women with the same face sets a reclusive shaman on a journey from his dark forest cabin to the barren, windswept shores of a lighthouse.

    In Kaiku our relationship with nature is explored through sounds and seasons. Set over the course of a year in the isolation of a small island Kaiku  is the result of a long-running fascination with traditional narrative, folklore and the natural environment.

     

    To order the book and find out more about Milla Koivisto head over to Millakoivisto.com

    Milla talks about the origins of the Kaiku project on her site which gives us an insight into her thought process and how the idea was born.

    “A story had been brewing in my mind for some time, not leaving me alone. On the last day of December 2012 I sat down at my desk in my apartment in Brighton and started to write. I have always been writing stories, but never been mature enough to sit still long enough to finish a longer piece. Writing a book is of course more then just an endurance sport -it is about finding a story you believe in, are passionate about and know is true. For me there was only one thing I could write about. I had to write about the sea and the island I grew up on. The project became a love letter to the landscape I knew. I was brought up on a small island called Kemiönsaari in the south coast of Finland, in the Baltic Sea. At the time I started writing Kaiku I had been living in the UK for seven years. I realised how little was written or known about the Finnish culture outside Finland. It became clear to me that the story needed to be written in English, so I added this on to my challenge and started writing in my third language.

    I started to write about an island, about a Shaman, a girl called Aino and her echo Kaiku. Kaiku in Finnish is both a name and the event of a sound caused by the reflection of sound waves from a surface back to the listener – an echo. What I wanted to portray in the story was the interconnection with the natural world and the people. It was important for me to show the integral connection between the people and their land. It also became a story about solitude, isolation and loneliness, themes I feel are close to the Finnish people through our characteristics, the geographical location of the country and perhaps even through the dissimilarity of our language compared to most other European languages.

     

     

    From the very beginning I wanted to create a whole world around the story of Kaiku. I wanted to not only to tell a story with words but also to make it come alive with sound and images. Kaiku became a multidisciplinary project structured around a core narrative. It is a project combining words, image, sound and music and video. So far the project has taken me to three small islands in Finland. In Summer 2014 I spent a month on the island of Kökar, in the Baltic Sea in Finland, living in the old post office that was converted in to an artist residence. My purpose was to compose and collect natural sounds for the project. I returned to the island in January 2015 to further compose and collect, this time the sound world of the Nordic winter. In summer of 2015 I divided my time living in Kemiönsaari and the small lighthouse island of Bengtskär at the Baltic Sea where I filmed and recorded natural sounds.

    Kaiku is an ongoing project which will be completed in 2017. The first part of the project, is a book titled Kaiku.”

    Contact Milla here

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    Njord Biennale – Colour of Sound

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 29th January 2016
  • Great news! After a very long Christmas break, Nordophile is back for 2016 and will continue to introduce to Nordophiles many different Nordic talents. But we aren’t the only ones who are are here! Last year in the summer we featured the up-and-coming Njord Biennale – Copenhagen Festival and in 2016 it’s arrived! From 28th January […]




    Great news! After a very long Christmas break, Nordophile is back for 2016 and will continue to introduce to Nordophiles many different Nordic talents.

    But we aren’t the only ones who are are here! Last year in the summer we featured the up-and-coming Njord Biennale – Copenhagen Festival and in 2016 it’s arrived!

    From 28th January to 1st February Copenhagen is going to explode with Colour & Sound from Nordic contemporary artists.

    “With a focus on timbre in music and color tones in the visual arts, the biennale brings together a number of cross cultured composers, visual artists, musicians, directors, etc. in Nordic collaboration on a number of cross artistic projects.”

     

     

    Programme

     

    NJORD Biennale has a clear aim to focus on the interaction between the tonal colors of music and colour tones of visual art. To live up to this aim, we have gathered a group of composers, artists, musicians, and directors etc. to create cross-artistic projects with a common Nordic tone.

    The festival´s programme offers five nights of concerts and three exhibits that will unfold the vision of this year´s theme. The programme is broad in scope  – both the well known and established as well as the new generation of composers are represented in NJORD´s diverse selection. Concert formats and content varies; from grand opera productions over experimental ensemble concerts with visuals, to intimate solo and duo performances.

     

    Featured Artists

     

     

    photo; Maarit Kytöharju

     

    Aliisa Neige Barrière (b. 1995) was born into a French-Finnish family in Paris, where her music studies have included violin, piano, chamber music and choral as well as orchestral conducting.

    The passionate chamber musician has participated in projects and master classes throughout Europe and America, and moving musical from the Baroque to the latest music.

    In Denmark Aliisa Neige Barrière helped to create the new Hindsgavl Nordic Chamber Orchestra and has participated in chamber music festival Open Strings.

    In the year 2011-2012 she studied violin with Renee Jolles in New York at the Preparatory Division of Mannes College of Music, as well as orchestral conducting and chamber music. As a winner of the Concerto Competition she played the first movement of the Khachaturian Concerto in March 2012 at Symphony Space, New York.

    After having received her Performance Diploma at the Conservatoire à Rayonnement Régional, she returned to New York in 2013 where she was awarded a full scholarship for four years of studies at Mannes College of Music, where she studied for 2 years with Lewis Kaplan and Laurie Smukler (violin), Michael Adelson and David Hayes (conducting) playing also in the Mannes Baroque Players under the direction of Nancy Wilson.

    As a passionate chamber musician, Barrière has participated in a great variety of projects and masterclasses throughout Europe and the United States, and is interested in all music from baroque to contemporary.

    Her recent engagements have included solo, conducting and chamber music appearances. She most recently conducted Stravinky’s L’Histoire du Soldat at Mannes College and is also a founding member of the new Hindsgavl Nordic Chamber Orchestra in Denmark and has participated in the Open Strings Chamber Music Festival both as a performer and in assisting in artistic programming.

    Since her move to Norway, her projects have included taking part in the celebration of the 80th birthday of pianist Liv Glaser in an all Mozart program on period instruments, under the direction of Bjarte Eike, and also producing and leading a special project, For Peace We Stand meant to unite musicians against barbary in the world.

    Aliisa Neige Barrière plays a 1717 violin by Claude Pierray.

     

    Avanti! Photo: Marco Borggreve
    Avanti! Photo: Marco Borggreve

     

    Finnish Avanti! Chamber Orchestra is a quite extraordinary artistic powerhouse! The ensemble was founded in 1983 on the initiative of Esa-Pekka Salonen, Olli Pohjola and Jukka-Pekka Saraste, and since 1998 clarinettist Kari Kriikku has been artistic director.

    Today Avanti! is renowned as one of the best ensembles for new music in the world. The ensemble specializes in no particular genre; rather, it is proud to be a specialist in all styles with a strong sense of responsibility for the music of today.

    Avanti! works in close partnership with front-line international conductors, soloists and composers, and has won many prizes and widespread acclaim from audiences and critics all over the world.

    The concerts at NJORD Biennale 2016 are the first time ever Avanti! Chamber Orchestra will perform in Denmark.

     

    photo; Nikolaj Lund

    photo; Nikolaj Lund

     

    Bjarke Mogensen (b.1985) This Danish accordionist at the age of 13 made his debut as a soloist in a German TV broadcast with the Munich Symphony Orchestra.

    In 2011, Bjarke Mogensen had his solo debut at Carnegie Hall, New York, and in 2012 he received 1st prize in the prestigious European Broadcast Unions “New Talent” competition in Bratislava.

    Bjarke Mogensen studied at the Royal Danish Academy of Music as a pupil of Geir Draugsvoll and today he teaches chamber music at the same place.

    He has given solo concerts all over the world from New York to Moscow, from Iceland to Turkey. He has performed chamber music with violinists Augustin Dumay and Gidon Kremer and cellist Andreas Brantelid. As a soloist he has worked with orchestras such as the Moscow Virtuosi, Kremerata Baltica, Slovak State Philharmonic Orchestra, The Tiroler Symphony Orchestra, the Danish National Symphony Orchestra and the Copenhagen Philharmonic, conducted by maestros such as John Storgårds, Francesco Angelico, Rafael Payare, Lan Shui, Rolf Gupta, Leos Svarovský, Beat Furrer and Vladimir Spivakov.

    A long succession of collaborations with prominent living composers has resulted in many new compositions – concertos, chamber music and solo works – dedicated to Bjarke Mogensen.

    Bjarke Mogensen’s repertoire is almost unlimited, with a span ranging from folk music and accordion classics over his own arrangements and transcriptions to brand new works for accordion.

     

    asa_gudjonsdottir_photo_guðmundur_ingo-lfsson (1)

    photo; Guðmundur Ingólfsson

     

    Asa Gudjonsdottir from Reykjavik, Iceland, came into a family devoted to the arts. Beginning her studies at the age of 3, and instantly became mesmerized with the instrument. At the age of 12, Asa was admitted to the Reykjavik Conservatory, ultimately leading up to her acceptance at the prestigious Icelandic Academy of the Arts where she studied with Auður Hafsteinsdottir. Asa has cultivated her talent with wonderful musicians, of which includes Routa Kroumovitch at Stetson University, Boris Kuschnir, in Vienna, and Anton Miller at the Hartt School of Music where she graduated with Masters in violin performance.

    Asa regularly performs in concerts and music festivals in Europe and United States, as a soloist and as a chamber musician. Her recent performances have included appearances at Scandinavia House in New York, Lincoln Center in New York, Icelandic embassy in Berlin and Washington D.C. She is a recipient of the Visa cultural award in Iceland, Fulbright Foundation and the American-Scandinavian Foundation.

    Asa’s latest concerts feature performances at the contemporary music festival, “Dark Music Days” in Reykjavik, Iceland, the “Mostly Nordic Concert Series” in Seattle in May with her duo, the Amaranth Duo, Mendelsohn Violin Concerto with the Icelandic Youth Orchestra and a premiere of Depo Flux, concerto grosso by Ken Steen at Lincoln Theater in Connecticut.

     

    jakob_kullberg_foto_charlotta_miranda

    photo; Charlotta Miranda

     

    Jakob Kullberg has been praised internationally for his performances of the modern cello concerto,  living in Paris, he is one of the most active and diverse young Danish instrumentalists.

    Jakob studied in a.o. Amsterdam, London, Zagreb, Vienna and Copenhagen, with Harro Ruijsenaars, Dmitri Ferschtman, Valter Despalj, Mats Lidström, Morten Zeuthen and Anner Bylsma.

    Top prize winner at international solo and chamber music competitions, twice winner of the Danish Grammy, most recently in 2013 for his concerto CD ’Momentum’ which was also nominated for the coveted Gramophone Award in London and chosen for ’Album of the Week’ with Q2 Music, New York.

    In 2011 he was awarded the ’Gladsaxe Music Prize’ and has been artist in residence for, amongst others, the Tivoli Garden Concert Hall, the International Carl Nielsen Violin Competition and New Music Orchestra, Poland.

    Jakob’s recent debut with The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra in London as well as with Ensemble Intercontemporain at one of their inter-sessions in Paris received excellent reviews, and he looks forward to concerto debuts with the Bergen Philharmonic and the BBC Philharmonic Orchestras. He is scheduled to record Per Nørgård’s Remembering Child with Sinfonia Varsovia in December 2014. In the 2016/17 seasons he will embark on a two-CD recording project with the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by John Storgårds comprising concertos by Saariaho and Nørgård as well as the two cello concertos by Shostakovich.

    He has returned frequently to prestigious international festivals such as the Aldeburgh Festival, the Warsaw Autumn Festival, the Huddersfield Festival and Bergen International Festival.

    Jakob enjoys a unique working relationship with the Danish composer Per Nørgård, who has composed and dedicated numerous works for him; the two have developed a rare dialogical collaboration in which the composer utilises the creative potential of the cellist in an experimental composition process. He is also a notable interpreter of the work of Bent Sørensen and in 2011 he moved to Paris to focus on his collaboration with Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho.

    As a teacher Jakob has garnered attention giving masterclass internationally at for instance, the Royal Academy of Music in London, the Norwegian Academy of Music and the Karol Szymanowski Academy of Music in Poland, and has held a teaching position at the Royal Danish Academy of Music since 2005.

    In 2013, he was appointed to the Norwegian Artistic Research Fellowship Programme and has been the artistic director of the Open Strings Cello Academy since 2004.

    For more information and other featured artists head over to njordbiennale.com

     

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    Lights in Alingsås

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 14th October 2015
  • The Lights in Alingsås festival opened on September 25th and runs through to November 1st. Just 40 minutes outside of Gothenburg, this light festival is definitely a must see this Autumn. Visit the festival to see and witness some incredible light displays and installations around Alingsås.   Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin   It started in 1999 […]




    The Lights in Alingsås festival opened on September 25th and runs through to November 1st. Just 40 minutes outside of Gothenburg, this light festival is definitely a must see this Autumn. Visit the festival to see and witness some incredible light displays and installations around Alingsås.

     

    Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin

     

    It started in 1999 when students from HDK, Jönköping University and Gothenburg University gathered in Alingsås to experiment with different lighting designs for public buildings. The following year, the municipality entered into agreements with the Professional Lighting Designers’ Association – PLDA, who have brought the international world of lighting design to Alingsås every October since then. The result is an educational and fun lighting event which has grown annually.

    – Already in the early years the Municipality of Alingsås showed a huge interest in lighting, which was matched by interest from an international audience. Today, Lights in Alingsås welcomes more than 85 000 visitors annually. “We are obviously very proud,” says Kjell Hult, Development Manager at Alingsås Municipality and one of the initiators of Lights in Alingsås.

     

    Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin

     

    Children are our future

    Children Lights is running for the third year in a row.  The 2015 overall theme is notoriously Evolution of Light, and the Children’s Future Park is a part of it. The installations kids create symbolizes their own thoughts about the future, what they hope for and what they imagine.

    – Our heart burns for Alingsås, and we totally support everything that makes it better to live here. Brilliant Children, Children’s Future Park and Children’s bright are exciting new features of this year’s light festival. As the main sponsor of the Lights in Alingsås we are extremely pleased with this year’s children’s initiative, says Klas Fresh, Sparbanken Alingsås.

     

    Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin

     

    Bright children

    New this year is the “Bright Child” – a playful place for all children to experience this scene, where Malin Wallin, designer and drama teacher has created a playful place for all children. Malin Wallin explains:

    “Children have gathered at the lit up trees and house. Here they have started to play. There are light fairy tales and houses which can dance. This illuminates the play and everyone can join in. Everyone gets to be a part of the light from now and into the future, from the heart to the world. ”

    The scene Bo

    Malin Wallin has also created an interactive scene in the park in the form of the creature Bo, where children can create shadows in the gap at Bo. With the stage, she has wanted to attract up to play on the scene, one can create shadows in the gap and from there to become part of the installation. Future bright for Malin is the children’s own lighting force, to light today and into the future is a material to play with, able to create and shape of. A material to experiment with, discover and enjoy.

    Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin 

    Light Designers

    A new group of lighting designers have gathered in Alingsås to start the creative work of Lights in Alingsås in 2015. The theme is “Evolution of Light” and will take visitors on a journey through time in light characters and highlight major finds of all time. Together with Professor Jan Ejhed working at KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, the designs do a deep dive into the history of light to find interesting finds and phenomena to work along with this year’s loop. Audio will also this year be part of the installations and composer Sebastian Studnitzky from Germany will lead the creative process of creating the right sound with this year’s designs.

     

    Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin

     

    This year’s lighting designer is Anna Sbouko from Greece, Kevan Shaw from Scotland, Roberto Corradini & Marco Palandella from Italy, Reinhard Germer from Germany, Katja Winkelmann from Germany, Andrea Hartranft from the US and Catherine Hennig from Sweden.

    Another exciting year of creation has begun in Alingsås which you will get to enjoy during the month of October.

    You will also find a workshop at the festival.

    The workshop teaches the theoretical and practical knowledge in lighting design. The main objective is to have a professional lighting designer who will guide participants through the entire lighting process with a fair and full-scale projects. Workshop Week lasts for seven days and supported by the industry with advanced lighting equipment.

     Photograph Patrik Gunnar Helin

    This year’s workshop is now full, but there is the possibility to get information about next year’s workshop in advance, please send an email to lights@alingsas.se with contact details and we will contact you when we open registration for in 2016.

    Welcome to Lights in Alingsås in the Autumn! Lightsinalingsas.se

    Thank you to Lights in Alingsas for text and pictures.

    Featured image Robert Persson

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    ARoS Aarhus Art Museum

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 13th October 2015
  • Whilst exploring the Nordic countries you can’t ignore the amount of Art and Cultural events and premises which indulge visitors in some of the most innovative and exciting art. Denmark is no acception and in its second largest city, Aarhus, you will find  ARoS Aarhus Art Museum. ARoS is a house of art where guests can […]




    Whilst exploring the Nordic countries you can’t ignore the amount of Art and Cultural events and premises which indulge visitors in some of the most innovative and exciting art.

    Denmark is no acception and in its second largest city, Aarhus, you will find  ARoS Aarhus Art Museum.

    ARoS is a house of art where guests can be pleased, enlightened and challenged. The architecture is of international class. The same is the art. And both offer experiences of high carat: from light to thrill, from attitude to entertainment, from joy to challenge.

     

     

    THE GALLERIES

    The art museum contains four large exhibition galleries of just under 1,100 square metres and The West Gallery with its 350 square metres.  Each gallery shows special exhibitions with both national and international artist such as Bill Viola, Olafur Eliasson, Wim Wenders, Paul McCarthy, Shirin Neshat and Robert Rauschenberg. Besides the special exhibitions the galleries give the opportunity to view works from the museum’s own collections featuring work dated from 1770 until today including contemporary works by international artists such as Tony Oursler, Carsten Höller, Mona Hatoum, Miwa Yanagi and James Turrell.

    In addition international light-, video- and installation art are presented in the special exhibitions section “The 9 Rooms” in the basement.

     

    ARoS FOCUS//NEW NORDIC
    NEW NORDIC EXHIBITION SERIES AT ARoS

    On the 7th March 2015, ARoS opened its doors to a new exhibition series in the West Gallery: ARoS FOCUS//NEW NORDIC. The series is directly focused on Nordic contemporary art and will be running for a period of three years. A total of nine young Nordic artists will be presented.

    ‘We want to present the kind of art to our museum visitors that they won’t normally have access to. Art by interesting international artists. Art that is largely unknown, but relevant, appealing and to the point. ARoS FOCUS//NEW NORDIC is an interesting option intended to meet the ever rising expectations of our visitors and expanding their horizons even further,’ says Erlend Høyersten, museum director, ARoS.

     

    NATHALIE DJURBERG &; HANS BERG – 22 OCTOBER 2015 – 22 FEBRUARY 2016

    Taking their point of departure in especially the visual artist Nathalie Djurberg’s (1978) personal fantasies and notions, the artist couple attempt to visualise the often less flattering aspects of the human psyche. This they achieve via integrated installations consisting of large modelled sculptures, video animations and atmospheric music. Nathalie Djurberg and the composer Hans Berg (1978) provide a space in their works for frustration, fear, desire, violence and imagination in a very private and symbolic manner coinciding with a specialzeitgeist characterised by a strong focus on the individual and on identity.

    Exhibition manager for ARoS FOCUS//NEW NORDIC: acting senior curator Lise Pennington.

     

    CURRENT EXHIBITIONS & EXHIBITORS

    The 9 Spaces

    The 9 Spaces is a designated exhibition space at the subterranean basement level of ARoSAarhus Kunstmuseum, reserved to and specially designed for international light art, video art and installations. For the most part, new acquisitions has been funded from the Carlsberg Foundation’s donation to ARoS Aarhus Kunstmuseum of DKK 40m over a ten year period.

    The following works are currently installed in The 9 Spaces:

     

     

    TONY OURSLER, USA, 2004
    Unk, 2004

    A solid glass tank measuring 2 x 2 x 2 metres filled with water is the setting for a large human head, cast in glass fibre, onto which a face is projected. The darkened space that surrounds the tank adds to the eerie atmosphere. The work is thus a further development of Tony Oursler’s (b. 1957) previous productions where he brings dolls to life by means of projected video images.

     

    JAMES TURRELL, USA

    Milkrun III, 2002

    James Turrell’s (b. 1943) light work is contrived by artificial light. The viewer confronts a smouldering red light field which is fractured by a blue and yellow light that slit-formingly cuts into it, thus introducing tridimensionality into a diffuse opal-hued light. Instead of a spectacular effect, this shimmering field of colour produces a sense of thoughtful, reticent drama.

     

    PIPILOTTI RIST, SCHWITZERLAND
    Dawn Hours in the Neighbour’s House, 2007

    Swiss Pipilotti Rist (b. 1962) has created an installation especially for The 9 Spaces where the guest in just 8 minutes can experience 24-hours. Her unique video/sound installation is staging one of daily life’s banal, yet magic moments: the dawn of light. Rist has established a living room with furniture, wall paper, windows and plants. Video, sound and light create different atmospheres in the dawn of light. She seems preoccupied with the seemingly ordinary, well known aspects of life. But there is a twist. There is something strange and unfamiliar about the house –underlined by the fact that the artist has created a home in something as unnatural and alien as the space of a museum.

     

     

    OLAFUR ELIASSON, DENMARK/ICELAND
    Surroundings, 2007

    The Danish-Islandic Olafur Eliasson born 1967 is a well established, modern artist. Eliasson has earned his fame making large scale artworks that combine natural science with art. In The 9 Spaces at ARoS Eliasson combines these two elements yet again with great effect inSurroundings. By confronting the viewer with different physical experiments he challenges the sense of sight and makes our eyes see something which is not there. Eliasson thereby seek to create a disorientation in how we interact with the world and how we create the idea of ourselves by interacting with the things that surrounds us.

     

    MARIKO MORI, JAPAN
    Tom Na H-lu,2006

    Mariko Mori’s work is in elegant and fitting manner combining spirituality and cyber technology. Tom Na H-lu was the name given by the ancient Celts to the place where the human soul took up abode before being reborn. To the Celts, Tom Na H-lu was in the shape of a tall monolith. Mori has recreated this monolith in matt glass. The glass sculpture contains a computer-controlled LED light source, which changes colour whenever a star dies and when the celestial bodies known as neutrinos, which are elementary particles created by a fusion between sun and star, move in space. Via the internet, this work is linked to a supercomputer in the Super Kamiokande Observatory in Tokyo University.

     

    OLAF BREUNING, SCHWITZERLAND
    First,2003

    In our initial encounter with the Olaf Breuning’s (b. 1970), work we see a video projected on to a white sheet. However, the white sheet turns out to be the reverse of an E.T. figure the size of a child, the likeable little space creature from Steven Spielberg’s film from 1982. The main figure and narrator in the video is that of Brian Kersetter, a young man who in the course of a video lasting seven minutes takes us along with him to various geographical locations with widely different stories to tell – from the Venetian Hotel in Las Vegas through the Wild West to Amish Pennsylvania in the USA. The video makes great use of echoes from the commercial film industry, including both films and advertisements. We are repeatedly told in the video how bored the narrator is, and how this boredom seems to provide the stimulus for the succeeding actions.

     

     

    A New Dynasty – Created in China

    A Chinese view on China and a new monumental installation created for ARoS by the legendary artist and system critic Ai Weiwei. These are some of the things awaiting the visitor when ARoS opens its doors on 21 November 2015 to the exhibition A New Dynasty – Created in China.

    ARoS has hand-picked 25 Chinese contemporary artists for the exhibition A New Dynasty – Created in China who will be showing a colourful array of paintings, installation art, video, sculpture, and photography. The exhibition breaks with Western cliché-ridden ideas of China as a Made in China culture by presenting the participating Chinese artists’ view on China. Weighty subjects such as Chinese national feeling and freedom of expression run as undercurrents through the spectacular works of art.

    ’With A New Dynasty – Created in China, ARoS wishes to combine the external gaze on China with the internal. We want to present Chinese contemporary art that does not exclusively look for inspiration within a Western frame of reference, but also in its own history, including early dynasties and China’s actual social and political context’, says museum director and curator of the exhibition Erlend G. Høyersten, ARoS.

    ‘China is facing a time of upheaval. The country is an elite economic and cultural superpower whose structural changes take place at a dizzying speed. China’s development means a lot more to our lives in the West than we care to admit. China’s future is our future, and this is why the exhibition is relevant’, adds Erlend G. Høyersten.

     

    Sui Jianguo, Motion And Tention, 2009 Mobile Studio , 2012, Photo Installation. Photo: ARoS

     

    ABOUT THE EXHBITION

    A New Dynasty – Created in China is a visual, thought-provoking, and inspiring encounter with China as a present-day superpower. The works of art will give visitors unique keys to the understanding of a world which is both familiar and strange at the same time; the complex and multi-faceted phenomenon of China.

    With this exhibition, ARoS focuses on the artists’ work methods and unusual approaches to Chinese reality, accentuating the political and social discord characterising China: the social elite contra the masses and the Communist ideology contra the fast growing market economy this country is experiencing.

    A LEGENDARY SYSTEM CRITIC VISITS AARHUS

    ARoS is particularly proud to be able to present Ai Weiwei at this exhibition. He just had his passport returned from the Chinese authorities and is now, for the first time in four years, free to travel. Quite exceptionally, Ai Weiwei has consented to participate in the group exhibition and he will create a new monumental installation for A New Dynasty – Created in China.

    ‘The fact that a notable artist and proponent of freedom of speech such as Ai Weiwei shows an interest in A New Dynasty – Created in China says something about the topicality and quality of this exhibition. We want to raise questions such as: what exactly fascinates, engages, and challenges contemporary Chinese artists? Where is Chinese society going in a national and an international sense?’, says Erlend G. Høyersten.

     

    Zhan Dali, Man And Beast, 2008

     

    A SELECTION OF ARTISTS AND THEIR WORKS

    Ai Weiwei (b. 1957):

    In his installation Yu Yi, 2015, Ai Weiwei links past and present. The work of art is a figure, 12 m in length and plaited in bamboo, that will float eight metres above visitors’ heads. The figure is a reference to a specific jade funeral garb from the Han Dynasty (c. 2000 years ago). At the same time, Yu Yi is a flying superman referring directly to China as the ultimate world superpower.

    Xu Bing (b. 1955):

    Xu Bing’s installation 1st Class, 2011, consists of 500,000 Chinese cigarettes laid out in an intricate pattern so that, from a distance, the cigarettes resemble a huge tiger’s skin. The tiger is central to Chinese culture as the symbol of health, strength, and prosperity. In this way, Xu Bing constructs a contrasting relationship between the symbolism inherent in the installation – the powerful tiger – and the actual content of the art work – the cigarettes presenting health risks. China is the world’s largest consumer and producer of tobacco. 43 per cent of all cigarettes in the world are produced in China. Add to this the fact that more than 300 million Chinese from all social classes are smokers.

    Maleonn (b. 1972):

    I his project Mobile Studio, 2012, Maleonn used the social medium Weibo to invite the whole country of China to orchestrate itself. The project resulted in 1,600 pictures and Maleonn spent one year criss-crossing the People’s Republic of China. Mobile Studio manages to bring a global social trend into focus: the culture of self-orchestration while the democratic nature of the project suspends Chinese class divisions allowing the meeting of high and low in this fictional project. Mobile Studio presents China in a series of creative, imaginative, and humorous individuals whose dreams, thoughts, and imagination are universal.

    Yin Xiuzhen (b. 1963):

    Yin Xiuzhen often uses recycled materials in her sculptures and art installations. As part of her project Portable Cities, Yin Xiuzhen will create a new work for the exhibition A New Dynasty – Created in China, namely a 3D travelling suitcase installation of Aarhus city sewed in local second-hand textiles. Yin Xiuzhen is fascinated with personal recollection. She sees memory as man’s most important roots in a modern world – especially in a country such as China where social and structural changes take place at a fast pace.

     


    WANG YUANZHENG
    150×200cm, Oil On Canvas 2015, Credit: ARoS

     

    COMPLETE LIST OF ARTISTS TAKING PART

    Ai Weiwei, Peng Wei, Chen Danqing, Sui Jianguo, Shao Fan, Zhang Xiaogang, Li Songsong, Zhang Dali, Jing Kewen, Wang Yuanzheng, Chen Fei, Miao Xiaochun, Zhang Xiaotao, Xu Bing, Guan Fengdong, Liu Jianhua, Maleonn, Chen Xiaodan, Ji Wenyu, Zhu Weibing, Feng Feng, Yin Xiuzhen, Lam Laam Jaffa, Mao Tongqiang, Song Dong

    The exhibition A New Dynasty – Created in China is showing from 21 November 2015 to 22 May 2016 in the exhibition galleries at levels 1 and 6.

    Curator: Erlend G. Høyersten, museum director, ARoS
    Curator: Pernille Taagaard Dinesen, curator, ARoS

    External curators:
    Curator:  Feng Boy
    Curator: Bjørn Inge Follevaag
    Curator: Wang Dong

    Featured image; The world-famous Danish-Icelandic artist, Olafur Eliasson, has created Your rainbow panorama and it was officially opened in May 2011 on top of ARoS. 

    For more information about exhibitions and the ‘Whats on’ head to aros.dk

    Thank you to ARoS ART Museum for text & photos

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    Swedish inspired artist Ange Mullen Bryan

  • Sarah Surgey
  • 1 Comment
  • 7th October 2015
  • A few months ago we showcased a British artist whose work is inspired by the Swedish landscape and the Nordic light which brings her subjects to life. We have been following Nordophile Ange Mullen-Bryan this year and as we are now firmly into Autumn we wanted to highlight some of her exhibitions which you may want […]




    A few months ago we showcased a British artist whose work is inspired by the Swedish landscape and the Nordic light which brings her subjects to life.

    We have been following Nordophile Ange Mullen-Bryan this year and as we are now firmly into Autumn we wanted to highlight some of her exhibitions which you may want to attend and see her work for yourself.

    For Nordophiles with an interest in art or the landscape of the Nordic lands these exhibitions may be of interest to you.

     

    Photo credit; Åsa Höjer

    She has been selected as a finalist for the National Open Art Prize 2015 and her painting Dark House will be hung in the subsequent exhibition of finalists at the Royal College of Art in London, starting in late October.

    Ange’s new painting Semblance has also been selected to hang in the 163rd Royal West of England Academy Autumn Open competition exhibition in Bristol which has opened in the last few days.

    NOA 2015 EXHIBITION at THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF ART
    21 October to 1 November 2015
    Monday to Saturday – 10am to 6pm
    Sunday 11am to 4pm

     

    My paintings are inspired by the lakes, forests and skies of a vast Swedish landscape and a very particular and illuminating Nordic light. I paint often remote and unpeopled wilderness. These paintings plot points on a journey; be it a physical or emotional one. As if I were looking for a map to navigate my way through this landscape, I let the act of painting lead me. I give myself up to the chaotic and emotional journey, compelling and uncertain.

    Red barns and homesteads; sharp and crackling branches lash against smooth snow with long red shadows and fierce pink skies.Hot lupins, dark pines, slippery, dripping lakes and quiet fires. Distant echoes of the groaning, warping and thumping of a lake trapped under ice.

    This is a land that becomes something closer to a scene from ancient myth or folklore, where the imagination runs away and the uncanny resides. Where the real and imagined co-exist and are often difficult to determine from one another. Here you find yourself beginning to believe that the little people of folk tales do come out at twilight.

    I am often enticed by precarious boundaries, where land meets lake and light meets dark. In these unsteady places, you are neither safe nor at risk but feel both at once.

    In the wilderness, I feel vulnerable in the face of nature and that seems rare and unusual in such a convenient world. You learn to respect nature and listen to it. This is both humbling and profound and it forces you to engage with forgotten instincts. I love feeling that intensity, it reminds me of the ancient nature of our evolution which shapes us.

    I work on coloured linens and canvases, leaving vast stretches unpainted, I drip and patch the thin veils and thick strokes of paint together. Colour and form knock, jar and rest against each other, a tangle makes a whole.

    I invite an escape into a kind of utopia, where you can smell freedom and pine in the air, a place I think I know. Yet I nod to the nagging impossibility of it and remind you that good fairy tales have a lesson within them. I tell darker tales and dress them up in the fabric, the costume, of colour and light. 

     

    Ange Mullen-Bryan 2015

    For more information head to angemullenbryan.com

     

     

     

     

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    ‘What’s On’ SATC NYC

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 1st October 2015
  • Nordophile has been keeping in touch with our friends at the Scandinavian American Theater Company based in New York and wanted to share with you some very important upcoming events which are very much keeping Nordic theatre alive!   Kwasi Osei and Zenzele Cooper from SATC’s Off-Broadway production “Bastards of Strindberg”, photographer Kait Ebinger   […]




    Nordophile has been keeping in touch with our friends at the Scandinavian American Theater Company based in New York and wanted to share with you some very important upcoming events which are very much keeping Nordic theatre alive!

     

    Kwasi Osei and Zenzele Cooper from SATC’s Off-Broadway production “Bastards of Strindberg”, photographer Kait Ebinger

     

    Firstly, we spoke with one of the actors, Christiane Seidel (from Boardwalk Empire) and found out from her what it is like to be part of not only SATC in New York but the Nordic community as well.

     

    Photo credit Christopher St. George.

     

    How did you first become involved with SATC?

    As a half-Dane, I had excitedly been following SATC for a while and was quite impressed with their consistent body of work, especially since the company had only been around for a couple of years. While I was shooting Boardwalk Empire, our casting director Meredith Tucker had asked me if I could recommend any Norwegian men for a role she was casting. I reached out to Albert Bendix, SATC’s Co-Artistic Director and a fellow Dane, to see if he had any suggestions and we ended up meeting for coffee. We hit it off, kept in touch and this spring SATC reached out to me if I was interested in possibly becoming a member. Because this company doesn’t mess around, I even had to come in for an interview (a very nice one with coffee and Scandinavian cookies) with the entire company. Albert even skyped in from Denmark as he was on tour. Somehow I was able to prove myself worthy and now I’m responsible for Audience and Press Coordination.

     

    Have you seen an equal interest by both the Nordic and New York audience?

    Absolutely. SATC has a large audience following our productions, our SATContemporary Reading Series, and on our social media. For example, we have approximately 80-100 audience members per reading and that includes all ages of Scandinavians, Americans with Scandinavian roots, and Americans with an interest in new Nordic theater and contemporary culture.

     

    Rikke Lylloff and Albert Bendix from SATC’s Off-Broadway production “Bastards of Strindberg”, photographer Kait Ebinger

     

    Nordic eateries are popping up all over New York and the attendance to exhibitions by Nordic artists is high. Do you feel Nordic drama productions is on the same level of acceptance?

    There is definitely a surge in interest in all things Nordic. Especially, since Scandinavian tv shows like The Killing, The Bridge, or Borgen as well as Scandinavian literature have become widely popular (in their original or their US remakes) and Scandinavian actors like Mads Mikkelsen, Joel Kinnaman, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau or Birgitte Hjort Sørensen are being cast on American tv shows and films. We can feel that this definitely has an effect on the interest in what Scandinavian storytelling looks like on stage. Especially, when we’re inviting some of these actors to join us for readings. However, contemporary Scandinavian plays and playwrights are still relatively unknown stateside. So with SATC we’re in an exciting position to be able to bring these plays to New York for the first time. In a sense we’re educating the New York audiences about their existence while filling that increasing interest in Scandinavian culture. There are so many edgy, interesting, and widely different plays that are a cultural representation of what Scandinavia is today. I might be biased, but I definitely feel that we’re approaching the same level of acceptance very fast.

     

    Finally, you are performing a couple of  readings for SATC, can you tell us a bit about what we can expect.

    Our audience is definitely in for a fun (and free!) evening. We’ll have wine, guest actors and we’ll have up-and-coming playwright Marius Leknes Snekkevåg flying in from Norway. Our readings always take place at the beautiful Scandinavia House on Park Avenue. We’ll be presenting two short plays from Marius – one dramatic and one comedic. There’ll be a short Q&A with everyone and usually, we go out for drinks at a nearby bar, which is fun as we get a chance to chat with our audience. Personally, I’m extra excited as this will be my first time performing for SATC.

     

    Readings by

    Marius Leknes Snekkevåg (playwright, reading #1 on Oct 5, Norwegian plays)

    Courtesy of SATC

    Christiane Seidel (actress, reading #1 on Oct 5, Norwegian plays). www.christianeseidel.com

     

    Tomas Lagermand Lundme (playwright, reading #2 on Nov 9, Danish play “The Sauna”).

    Courtesy of SATC

    What’s On

    We’ll be kicking off our upcoming season with a new concept called “Shows in Development”. Here we invite audiences to follow and experience our process of creating an off-Broadway production at an early stage to give our audience the opportunity to ask questions and bring their thoughts to the table. The first show in development is titled “The Remember Me Project” and our first audience interaction will be on Sept 21, 2015 at 7:30pm with a pre-reception at 7:00pm. The play we’re working on is titled “Remember Me” (original title “Muista minut”) by Finnish writer Minna Nurmelin.

    We’re also continuing with our popular SATContemporary Reading Series. This is the sixth season of the series where we present five staged readings – one from each of the Nordic countries Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. The readings are one-night-only events, free to the public.

    The first reading will be on Oct 5, 2015 presenting two plays by the Norwegian playwright Marius Leknes Snekkevåg: “I Love You, Let Me Go” and “We Are The Voice of Our People”.

    The second reading will be on Nov 9, 2015 introducing Danish playwright Tomas Lagermand Lundme and his play “The Sauna”. For this reading, we’ll also have a guest star (TBA) joining us.

    The dates for the remaining readings are Jan 25, 2016, Feb 29, 2016, and May 2, 2016. We’re currently in the process of deciding on the individual plays.

    All our readings and “Show in Development” projects take place at Scandinavia House (http://www.scandinaviahouse.org/ at 58 Park Avenue, 10016 NYC) at 7:30pm with a 7:00pm pre-reception.

    In 2016, we’ll present the US-premiere of Norwegian playwright Arne Lygre’s play “Then Silence” as an Off-Broadway production.

    Head over to satcnyc.org to find out more
    Featured image Full cast from SATC’s Off-Broadway production “Bastards of Strindberg”, photographer Kait Ebinger
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    Screen City Festival – Stavanger, Norway

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 10th September 2015
  • Screen City festival 15th-18th October “an expanded cinematic experience about Labour in Norway” will be dedicated to presenting the moving image in public spaces and to exploring the relationship between moving image, sound, and architecture. The festival’s format expands the borders of cinematic experience – reflecting upon the line between the filmatic and the non-filmatic.     […]




    Screen City festival 15th-18th October “an expanded cinematic experience about Labour in Norway” will be dedicated to presenting the moving image in public spaces and to exploring the relationship between moving image, sound, and architecture. The festival’s format expands the borders of cinematic experience – reflecting upon the line between the filmatic and the non-filmatic.

     

     

    Screen City – Moving Image Festival Stavanger presents: Labour & The City In-between. Artists Harun Farocki, Antje Ehmann, Rosa Barba, and an extended list of Czech and Nordic video artists takes over the city, October 15-18th 2015: exploring the temporal, motional and spatial qualities of labour in our current post-industrial climate.

     

    Stavanger, Norway

     

    Curated by Daniela Arriado (CL/NO).

    The point of departure for this year’s program is the post-industrial climate we meet in Europe today. This climate has left us with fluctuating definitions of labour, exploitation of labour, and an unknown economic future. How do these industrial changes affect a city`s architectonic and social rooms? Through the streets of Stavanger, from the Concert Hall to the old industrial port, you will find artworks activating the buildings’ facades. Every building tells a story, and these stories form our city. With the aim of transforming buildings from objects into subjects, we have invited artists – who explore the temporal, motional and spatial qualities of labour in our current post-industrial climate – to present their works in the public spaces of Stavanger.

     

     

    la•bor

    to perform labor; work.
    to strive, as toward a goal; work hard
    productive activity, esp. for the sake of economic gain.
    physical or mental work, esp. of a hard or fatiguing kind.

    The point of departure for this year’s program is the post-industrial climate we meet in Europe today. This climate has left us with fluxuating definitions of labour, exploitation of labour, and an unknown economic future. How do these industrial changes affect a city`s architectonic and social rooms? Through the streets of Stavanger, from the Concert Hall to the old industrial port, you will find artworks activating the buildings’ facades. Every building tells a story, and these stories form our city. With the aim of transforming buildings from objects into subjects, we have invited artists – who explore the temporal, motional and spatial qualities of labour in our current post-industrial climate – to present their works in the public spaces of Stavanger.

     

     

    Old industrial port where  several of the works will be presented

     

    Featured Artists

    Ane Hjort Guttu (NO)

    ARTIST TALK & PREVIEW SCREENING: TIME PASSES
    FRIDAY 16 OCTOBER, 2-4PM
    ROGALAND KUNSTSENTER

    Ane Hjort Guttu presents her recent film related to her investigation into issues of power, freedom and the role of art and artists within political systems. Time Passes (2013) is a 45 min film produced for the 2015 Festival Exhibition in Bergen. Time Passes portrays the art student Damla and her ongoing performative project – begging in the streets of Bergen. Ane Hjort Guttu is an artist, writer and curator based in Oslo. Through video works, picture collections, sculpture and photography her recent work has focused on the issues of power and freedom in the Scandinavian post-welfare state. She also writes analytical as well as poetical texts, and several of her projects discuss art and architectural history.

     

    Photo credit; Ane Hjort

     

    Nils Henrik Asheim (NO)

    ORGELNATT
    FRIDAY 16 OCTOBER, 9-11PM
    STAVANGER CONCERT HALL

    Composer Nils Henrik Asheim (b.1960) combines his career as a performer with regular artist collaborations on projects integrating spatial and theatrical elements. Asheim started out as a pupil of Olav Anton Thommessen and made his début as a composer at the early age of fifteen. Since 1991 Asheim has lived in Stavanger where he is active as a composer, performer and organizer, and not least as the principal initiator of the founding of Tou Scene, an alternative centre for contemporary arts. From September 2012, Asheim has been the organist at Stavanger Concert Hall. Orgelnatt – Organ Night – is a concept where Nils Henrik Asheim invites guest musicians to create a concert event around the organ, exploiting the instrument’s ability to create vast soundscapes. With the help of time and space, we invite the audience to submerge themselves in sound. Orgelnatt has since 2013 been hosted by Stavanger Konserthus. During Screen City Festival, Nils Henrik will perform together with Slovakian artists Pjoni (SK) and Ján Šicko (SK), transforming the concert hall and the organ into an electro-acoustic landscape utilizing mechanical midi management of the organ, and processing sounds from this. The production is part of the Orgel Night program, presenting Norwegian sound artists and musicians like Kjetil Brandsdal and Susanna Wallumrød. The evening will melt into a club program curated by Tou Scene: Electro Motives, presenting live DJ sets by André Bratten (NO) and Jennifer Cardini (FR)

     

    Photo credit; Nils Henrik Asheim

     

    Knut Åsdam (NO)

    MOBIL EGRESS
    DAILY, 6PM-MIDNIGHT
    LORRY, RYFYLKEGATA/MATHALLEN

    Mobil Egress is a touring lorry; an architectural art/film/cinema installation with the film Egress built inside the back compartment. It functions as a mobile cinema and is built up from installation elements to create an architectonic environment. The piece merges art and film distributed in an unusual way. It looks at contemporary Norway and its psychology through themes of work, class, oil and the material world. Egress is a narrative set in a gas station in the edge-lands of Oslo. The main characters work at the bottom of the oil company hierarchy and are engulfed in the everyday and the dark economic and psychological shadows of their society. Egress is the story of a young woman who deals with her everyday work situation with independence and stubbornness in her work and life in the periphery of the city. The film shows relationships between control and independence, about labour, class and work, but it is also a poetic film about a socially insecure edge-land of the city—and about a psychological flip side or cost of the everyday, somewhere near the bottom of the huge economic ladder of the oil industry which secures Norway’s stability. Knut Åsdam lives and works in Oslo, Norway.

     

    Photo credit; Knut Asdam

     

    Beathe C Rønning (NO)

    MEDITATIONS ON WORK III
    DAILY, 6PM-MIDNIGHT
    ROGALAND KUNSTSENTER

    For the past eight Beathe C Rønning has been filming manual and mechanical work processes. What interests her in these Meditations is the choreography that comes straight from the body, and from the routine operation of machines. Or that doesn’t. In practical terms, Meditations on Work is a three-channel video piece with a specially composed soundtrack, a soundless video composition showing sequences of people at work overlaid with scrolling text (II), and a booklet with stills and text. Each sequence is prosaic and commonplace, rooted in the here and now. The steady pulse of work that goes on around us all the time. For Rønning, it is here we find the greatest poetic potential, because here the beauty is subtle yet accessible. “Work is of two kinds: first, altering the position of matter at or near the earth’s surface relatively to other such matter; second, telling other people to do so.” (Bertrand Russell) An artist’s work falls between the manual and the abstract. Rønning neither give nor follow orders. She observes, films and reflects, refining impressions through the rhythm of composition, the pulse of the soundtrack, the focus of the text. “Copenhagen, Kvinesdal, Torp, Oslo, Berlin, Lier, Drammen, Sande: I must thank everyone who has allowed me to film them, and for all the goodwill I have met with.” (Beathe C. Rønning) During the Screen City Festival, Beathe will present Meditations on Work – edition 3, with a newly composed text. The work is presented on the Rogaland Kunstsenter facade window. (Credits: Peter Cribbs.no)

     

    Photo credit; Beate C Ronning

    For more information about other events taking place at #Screencity and the full range of artists appearing or taking part please head to 2015.screencity.no

    We would also like to thank Screen city for their text and photos.

    Featured image credited to Mirjam Struppek 

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    Ultima – Oslo Contemporary Music Festival

  • Sarah Surgey
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  • 7th September 2015
  • ClariNord-4-c-Jie-Yang-467x700

    Ultima – Oslo Contemporary Music Festival takes place September 10-19. This is a fascinating festival which we thoroughly recommend as it takes us through a celebration of music through collaborations, talks, commissions, exhibitions, improvised performances and of course music from every corner of genres. Held in Oslo this is the perfect opportunity for a Nordophile to […]




    Ultima – Oslo Contemporary Music Festival takes place September 10-19. This is a fascinating festival which we thoroughly recommend as it takes us through a celebration of music through collaborations, talks, commissions, exhibitions, improvised performances and of course music from every corner of genres.

    Held in Oslo this is the perfect opportunity for a Nordophile to explore this cultural mecca of a Nordic city and immerse in the music culture through the festival.

     

     

    Rikksscenen

     

    About

    Ultima is the premiere contemporary music festival in the Nordic region. The festival became a designated “knutepunkt” (cultural hub) in 2006 and is supported by the Ministry of Culture and Church Affairs and Oslo City Council. Ultima is a foundation with 17 members, all of them professional cultural institutions or organisations.

    The festival takes place during September and is staged at venues all around Oslo. Our events are staged both in large, established venues such as the Norwegian National Opera & Ballet, Oslo Concert Hall and the University of Oslo’s Great Hall as well as in small clubs, shop premises, industrial premises, museums, schools and outdoors.

    The Ultima Festival aims to promote artistic distinctiveness, trends and innovation and to make music of a high artistic standard accessible by everyone.

    His Royal Highness Crown Prince Haakon is the patron of Ultima.

     

    Featured Events

     

     

    Below are just a few of some of the events which are taking place. Head over to the Ultima website to find out about the other events which are taking place at the festival.

     

    Elisabeth Vatn: The color Beneath.

    Ekeberg park 6.30pm, September 10th

     

     

    Exclusive sunrise and sunset concerts with Elisabeth Vatn in James Turrell’s light installations in Ekeberg sculpture park.

    The Color Beneath by musician and composer ELISABETH VATN was conceived in James Turrell’s light installations in the old water reservoir on Ekeberg. Between 10–13 September, Vatn (harmonium, Meråker clarinet, bagpipes) performs withANDERS RØINE (langeleik, mouth harp, violin).

    Contemporary artist JAMES TURRELL works with perception, colour, light and space. The two location-specific works Ganzfeld: Double Vision and Skyspace: The Color Beneath were both created for the old water reservoir in 2013. While Ganzfeldexplores the way colours affect our senses, Skyspace makes use of the chromatic interaction between the concert space and the sky at dawn and dusk.

    In The Color Beneath the composer and performer turn their encounter with the installation into music, partly following the composition and partly through improvisation. Consequently, none of the concerts performed in this unique setting will be identical.

    The Color Beneath album was recorded during autumn 2014 and is released during Ultima 2015. The concerts are staged in cooperation with nyMusikk, Ekebergparken and Grappa Musikkforlag with contributions by Fond for Utøvende Kunstnere.

     

    Teknisk Museum, 10 AM

    Installation throughout festival

     

     

    ‘We are so used to seeing that suddenly we forgot how to look, so used to hearing that suddenly we forgot to listen.’

    Every movement we see in nature can be perceived as a visual concert, like a storm of birds moving together making astonishing patterns, or snow falling from the sky and touching the ground.Quintetto is based on the study of casual movement of objects or living creatures used as input for the production of sounds. The basic concept is to reveal what the ‘invisible concerts’ of everyday life. In this installation, the scene is five aquariums with a goldfish in each. The movement of the five fishes is captured by a video camera that translates their movements in digital sound signals/music in real time.

     

    Den Norske Opera & Ballett, Provesalen.

    MATTHEW SHLOMOWITZ: LECTURE ABOUT BAD MUSIC (WP)  ALEXANDER SCHUBERT: SENSATE FOCUS  September 11th 5pm

     

     

    Can music really be bad in itself or is ‘bad’ really nothing other than a subjective opinion?

    That is the question MATTHEW SHLOMOWITZ asks in Lecture About Bad Music, which was specially composed for the Anglo-Belgian octet. The work, which was written for lecturer, clarinet, electric guitar, synthesiser and violin, has been commissioned by Ultima and will receive its debut performance here. Australian-born Shlomowitz draws on elements from many fields and genres, employing musical demonstrations and recreations of psychological experiments to examine differences between musical experience and musical material.

    ALEXANDER SCHUBERT‘s Sensate Focus combines light and image, allowing lighting effects take on the role of a fifth performer to a quartet of musicians. In the work, Schubert, who studied bioinformatics, experiments with the interfaces between gesticular movements and musical sounds, where the performers’ physical movements and position in the room are essential elements of the composition.

    PLUS MINUS ENSEMBLE specialises in new music and modern key works. It is particularly known for its interest in avant-garde, experimental and conceptual music, such as Stockhausen’s seminal work from 1963, from which the ensemble takes its name.

     

    OCA (Office for Contemporary Art)

    September 13th 6.pm PRE-TALK AT OCA 5PM. INTRODUCTION BY KATYA GARCÍA-ANTÓN, DIRECTOR OF OCA.

     

     

    CAMILLE NORMENT, who is Norway’s entry to the 56th Venice Biennale, began her collaboration with composer and writer DAVID TOOP at Café OTO in London in 2014. The collaboration resulted in a performance at the Biennale. The performance explores the legends, stories and mysteries of the depth of the oceans through sound. It is still being continually developed, and will be performed at Ultima in September.

    The Oslo-based American artist CAMILLE NORMENT’S practice includes performance, installation, drawing and sound. She explores how the body is interconnected with its environment through sound, and contemplates on the power of dissonance to create spaces for new ways of thinking. DAVID TOOP is a British composer, writer and professor of Audio Culture and Improvisation at the London College of Communication. The third edition of his debut book, Rap Attack, has just been released. He has recorded five solo albums since he released Ocean of Sound in 1995.

    In cooperation with nyMusikk and the Office for Contemporary Art Norway.

     

    Black Box Teater; Annie Dorsen – Yesterday Tomorrow

    September 18th, 7pm & September 19th, 6pm

     

     

    AN EVOLUTIONARY MUSICAL

    Annie Dorsen’s Yesterday Tomorrow is a musical that breaks most of the rules for this genre. Unlike traditional musicals, the music for this musical is created during the course of the performance with the help of computer-generated algorithms, which means that the final result is different every time. The only points of reference are the two well-known songs Yesterday by The Beatles andTomorrow from the musical Annie.

    Based on evolutionary processes such as mutation and natural selection, the algorithms determine the most appropriate route from the first song to the next, or from what has passed to what is to come. As a result, the performance stands as an expression of the unpredictable nature of the present, as a contrast to a familiar past and the notion of a happy future. The music is performed by three singers who continually receive information about which rhythm, pitch and lyrics to sing. The result is an intelligent, humorous yet disturbing encounter between man and machine.

    Annie Dorsen has previously work in film, dance and theatre, and in recent years has been particularly interested in artificial intelligence and digital performance. The Yesterday Tomorrowproject was developed in cooperation with Pierre Godard and Greg Bellar from the Institute for Research and Coordination in Acoustics/Music (IRCAM.).

    Concept, direction: Annie Dorsen. Music director: Joanna Bailie. Algorithm design: Pierre Godard. Sound design: Greg Beller. Video systems design: Ryan Holsopple. Lighting design and technical direction: Bruno Pocheron, Ruth Waldeyer. Producer: Alexandra Rosenberg. Performers: Hai-Ting Chinn, Jeffrey Gavett & Natalie Raybould. Coproduction: Holland Festival, Black Box Teater, Performance Space 122, La Villette – Résidences d’Artistes 2015, L’Hippodrome, scène nationale de Douai, Théâtre de Gennevilliers with Festival d’automne à Paris, Le Maillon-Wacken – Scene européenne – Strasbourg, théâtre Garonne – Scène européenne – Toulouse. Supported by: Mount Tremper Arts, Abrons Arts Center, New York State Council on the Arts.

     

    CEO & Artistic Director – Lars Pettern Hagen

     

     

    “The board appreciates that Lars Petter Hagen will continue to manage the festival for another three years,” says Stein Gullberg, Chairman of the Board. “Mr. Hagen has brought an innovative spirit to the festival program and steered its administrative advancement with a steady hand. Public attendance is on a rise, and Ultima is meeting with ever growing international attention. It’s important to make the best use of this potential, which is best served by the continuity we achieve by extending this appointment. Lars Petter Hagen’s extensive network as well as the fact that he is held in esteem by a broad music and art environment, both within Norway and internationally.”

    Lars Petter Hagen has accepted the offer. “Oslo is a fabulous music town in constant growth, making the Ultima Festival one of the most exciting places to work in the whole world right now. I look forward to another three years with unpredictable musical encounters, dialog with the public and artists, good colleagues and partners,” he says.

     

    Ultima Academy

     

     

    How does art affect nature? How does nature affect art? For its 2015 edition, Ultima Academy invites scientists, music researchers and artists to talk about nature and discuss our attitude to it.

    Head over to Ultima.no to read more about the collaborations and what you can expect to see!

    Special thanks to Ultima for text and photos.

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    Helsinki Design Week

  • Sarah Surgey
  • Tagged , , , , Leave a comment
  • 1st September 2015
  • About Founded in 2005, Helsinki Design Week is the largest design festival in the Nordic countries. Held annually in September, the multidisciplinary festival presents design from a number of fields as well as fashion, architecture and urban culture. Helsinki Design Week will be held 3.–13.9.2015. Helsinki Design Week presents the new faces and phenomena of design, […]




    About

    Founded in 2005, Helsinki Design Week is the largest design festival in the Nordic countries. Held annually in September, the multidisciplinary festival presents design from a number of fields as well as fashion, architecture and urban culture. Helsinki Design Week will be held 3.–13.9.2015.

    Helsinki Design Week presents the new faces and phenomena of design, promotes design internationally in collaboration with various partners and offers city citizens through design a forum to participate in developing and discussing the city and its culture. The festival programme contains around 150 events every year, and includes both events targeted for professionals and the general public.

    The Helsinki Design Week main events are produced by Helsinki Design Week and its main partners. The Helsinki Design Week programme is produced in cooperation with national and international stakeholders and an extensive event-planning network. The programme is completed with selected events from an open call for programme entries. In 2014 the festival boasted about 110,000 visitors.

    The festival programme takes place in a variety of event spaces spread throughout the city: from museums to markets, from seminar halls to secret shops. The festival also actively seeks new spaces and ways to explore the city.

    Helsinki Design Week is produced by the design service agency Luovi Productions Oy.

     

    Featured events

    Below you will find some of the Design inspired events taking place throughout Helsinki Design Week. But there is so much more going on including a Lego Collective Workshop, The Children’s Weekend and A Focus on the Future of Cities. Check out on their site!

     

    A Workshop by Proloque Shop 10.9.15

    © JONNA JÄRVINEN

    ..”a workshop may be a room or building which provides both the area and tools (or machinery) that may be required for the manufacture or repair of manufactured goods.” (wiki)

    Proloque believes in the future of a fascinating live shop experience and unforgattable objects. Proloque Shop invited set designer and artist Jonna Järvinen to A WORKSHOP by Proloque Shop. In this Helsinki Design Week -evening Järvinen will finalize her magnificent dome-installations for Proloque, also upon customers wishes. Jonna Järvinen’s dome-installations are fascinating micro worlds that pay attention to the small details in life and nature surrounding us.

    You are welcome to follow and interact with her work or just enjoy our HDW evening,  where both beautiful objects and a shop comes alive. Small refreshments will be served.

     

    Cityspace 3-13.9.15

     

     

     

    A multi-dimensional meeting point of art and design, built out of containers by the seaside, right next to the newly renovated Old market hall of Helsinki. The transformable containers will work as a stage for surprising spaces and events where people and companies from different fields meet and create new and lively urban city culture. The event is produced by Hei Helsinki and Misc. Management.

     

    Anthology of Finnish Fashion 3-13.9.15

     

     

    This exhibition approaches its topic through nine themes: Folk, Globalization, The Engineering Mindset, The Millennium, Modernism, Change, the Economic Boom, Winter and Equality.

    In this exhibition, fashion is understood in a broad sense. The exhibits include technological clothing design, such as a motorcycle outfit and smart sportswear.

    The heritage of modernism is prominent in Finnish fashion design. Typical features of Finnish fashions in the spirit of modernism are practicality, functionalism and usability. The Modernism theme features work by Samuji and Irja Leimu, among others. On the other hand, the idiom of form is also influenced by colourful folk-inspired maximalism and decorativeness. The designers presented in the Folk theme include Sophie Sälekari and Annikki Karvinen.

    The conditions under which Finnish fashion and clothing designers have worked have changed radically from the 1950s to the present day. During the heyday of the Finnish fashion and clothing industry from the late 1960s to the beginning of the 1990s, there were over 500 manufacturers in this sector, employing a large number of designers. When trade with the Soviet Union collapsed and the clothing industry moved out of Finland, designers had to find new ways of earning their livelihood. Around the turn of the millennium,  brands established by young designers began to emerge in Finland. At present, Finnish fashion is a seamless part of international fashion.

    Designers and brands featured in the exhibition include Achilles Ion Gabriel,Ivana Helsinki, Jasmiine Julin-Aro, Karhu, Satu Maaranen, Makia,Marimekko, Mattisen Teollisuus, Daniel Palillo, Plastic Pony, Jukka Rintala,Anna Ruohonen and Vuokko.

    The curators of the exhibition are Suvi Saloniemi, Chief Curator of Exhibitions at Design Museum and journalist Liisa Jokinen. The exhibition architecture is by Linda Bergroth.

     

    I Heart Vallila 5.9.15

     

     

    The I Heart Vallila -urban event takes place on 5 September in Vallila. The event opens up the workshops, companies and brick-and-mortar shops of Vallila and makes visible the creative professionals working in the neighbourhood. Doors will be open and everyone is invited to meet the makers and creative workers of Vallila.

     

    The Charm of Musical Instruments 5.9.15

     

     

    Families are invited to the world of musical instruments in order to discover how the shape of the instrument affects its sound. Heureka Science Centre organises a workshop where children (5 years or older) can make curious and surprising “scientific” musical instruments. Jamkids Music School offers a music workshop where everyone can play. Jug band Dog in a Bucket presents and plays their home-made instruments.

    Children can try various instruments under the guidance of music teachers from the North Helsinki Music School. Mubik, a mobile game and virtual musical instrument, is presented as an example of the future.

    The event takes place in the Music! exhibition of the Helsinki City Museum.

    To meet the rest of the team and find out more about the events, head over to www.HelsinkiDesignWeek.com

     

     

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